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SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relaxed to a state bordering on unconscious after two days of gaming on the Riviera, the U.S. men's Olympic basketball team returned to competition, albeit slowly. The United States got off to its slowest start, but recovered and beat France, 111-71, in an exhibition before a sellout crowd of 2,500 in the airless Stade Louis XV on Tuesday night. The night turned into a love-in for Magic Johnson, with the crowd chanting "Mah-ZHEEK! Mah-ZHEEK!"
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SPORTS
July 8, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
WIMBLEDON, England — Roger Federer sweetly made delicate volleys drop as if it were no trouble at all. He ferociously aimed his one-handed backhand deep into the corners of Centre Court, making the ball land on lines and kick up chalk. He relentlessly kept attacking with his forehand, taking it crosscourt and up the lines. And finally he made Andy Murray cry. The third-seeded Federer, who turns 31 on Aug. 8 and had been without a major tournament championship for more than two years, earned a record-tying seventh Wimbledon men's singles title Sunday with a 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-4 victory over Murray, a Scotsman who had desperately wanted to be the first British man to win in singles here since Fred Perry in 1936.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Britain's Prince Charles and Princess Diana caught a London rock 'n' roll show together Saturday night, after weeks of speculation about the state of the royal marriage. Diana, appearing in a skin-tight, purple satin suit, munched sugary popcorn, clicked her fingers and drummed on her knees at the Wembley Stadium concert by Genesis while her husband, sitting next to her in the royal box, nodded his head in time to the beat and tapped on his knees during the faster songs.
SPORTS
July 3, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from Wimbledon, England – There was nothing Rafael Nadal could do Sunday about Novak Djokovic. Nadal couldn't stop Djokovic from stretching his limber body to reach from sideline-to-sideline. Nadal couldn't stop Djokovic from creating unrecognizable angles by making the ball go first here, to the left, then here, to the right, then off the baseline where a little dust and dirt and chalk would fly into Nadal's face. And Nadal couldn't stop Djokovic from kissing the Wimbledon turf and nibbling on a piece of grass.
SPORTS
July 6, 1987 | Associated Press
Britain won its first Wimbledon championship in three years Sunday as Jeremy Bates and Jo Durie made a dream come true by beating Darren Cahill and Nicole Provis of Australia, 7-6, 6-3, for the mixed doubles title. "This is the best day of my life so far, especially at Wimbledon," Bates said. "Going to the Royal Box and getting the cup was huge and unbelievable." Said Durie: "Today rates among the best, I must admit. It is a fantastic feeling to actually win it.
SPORTS
June 28, 1987 | Scott Ostler
WIMBLEDON, England-- Wimbledon is . . . . . . Buzzer stewing over the Bath Buns. Buzzer is R.E.H. (Buzzer) Hadington, chairman of Wimbledon. The main man. Bath Buns are sweet rolls baked in the approximate shape of a hamburger bun. They are named for the city of their origin. They have a light lemon flavor and are topped with sugar crystals. A couple of years ago, the Buzzer became aware of a market deteriorating in the quality of the Bath Buns served at Wimbledon.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Irish Republican Army plotted in 1983 to kill Prince Charles and Princess Diana at a rock concert in London, but the attack was foiled because the would-be assassin was also an informant for Irish police and British intelligence, the New York Times reported today. The newspaper identifies the turncoat guerrilla as Sean O'Callaghan, 42, who is serving multiple life sentences for two homicides and 40 other admitted acts of terrorism.
SPORTS
July 2, 1985 | MIKE LITTWIN, Times Staff Writer
No hearts, no flowers. No tears. There was some champagne in the press interview area, but that was about as emotional as it got. Virginia (Our Ginny) Wade, in her 24th Wimbledon, played her last singles match here Monday. When she lost to Pam Shriver--Our Pammy--Wade looked to the Royal Box to see if she should curtsy. No one was there.
SPORTS
June 26, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
When it is tea time at Wimbledon, even if there is a nail-biting tennis match being played, most of the dignitaries in the Royal Box and even most of the fans out on Court 14 or Court 19, the ones wearing cocktail dresses and those wearing jeans and T-shirts, head out for refreshments. That's just tradition, and it is the traditions more than anything that make Wimbledon still the most coveted tennis title. Tracy Austin, a two-time Wimbledon semifinalist who now does commentary for the British Broadcasting Company, said that now and when she played, Wimbledon was special.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2002 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, at a Beatles royal performance, John Lennon suggested that the rich and mighty who wished to applaud from the expensive seats could just "rattle your jewelry." On a lingeringly warm Saturday evening, in the first of two huge public concerts in the gardens of Buckingham Palace marking Queen Elizabeth II's 50 years on the throne, there wasn't a lot of jewelry to rattle--just murmuring strings of pearls around titled necks.
SPORTS
June 26, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
When it is tea time at Wimbledon, even if there is a nail-biting tennis match being played, most of the dignitaries in the Royal Box and even most of the fans out on Court 14 or Court 19, the ones wearing cocktail dresses and those wearing jeans and T-shirts, head out for refreshments. That's just tradition, and it is the traditions more than anything that make Wimbledon still the most coveted tennis title. Tracy Austin, a two-time Wimbledon semifinalist who now does commentary for the British Broadcasting Company, said that now and when she played, Wimbledon was special.
SPORTS
July 6, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
As a deathless fifth set bloated to 6-6 and to 10-10 and to an inconceivable 14-14, as it elongated to 95 minutes and left the corner scoreboard chockablock with numerals, this latest masterpiece of a Wimbledon final seemed to heave with the audacious aim of rivaling its hallowed predecessor.
SPORTS
June 25, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
Almost 200 minutes into one of those Wimbledon matches that meander toward darkness and feature raucous patrons who just might have had, you know, a sip, the Thousand Oaks tower prepared to serve at 4-5 in a fifth set. Sam Querrey walked along behind the baseline holding tennis balls while the Centre Court fans finished doing the globally deathless scourge known as "The Wave," their joy swelling when some dignitaries in the Royal Box joined in.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2002 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, at a Beatles royal performance, John Lennon suggested that the rich and mighty who wished to applaud from the expensive seats could just "rattle your jewelry." On a lingeringly warm Saturday evening, in the first of two huge public concerts in the gardens of Buckingham Palace marking Queen Elizabeth II's 50 years on the throne, there wasn't a lot of jewelry to rattle--just murmuring strings of pearls around titled necks.
SPORTS
February 22, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
To: Emperor Akihito. Date: 22 Feb 1998 (22 Ni-gatsu '98) Copy: Empress Michiko, Crown Prince Naruhito, Prince Akishino and Princess Sayako. From: An Ashamed U.S. Citizen. Re: Village Idiots. Your Majesty: On behalf of my people, I beg your pardon for our ice hockey hooligans' shenanigans. Your forgiveness, your highness, I do not beg. We have a woman in Washington, D.C., name of Janet Reno. Have your people call her people. Apprehend these criminals.
SPORTS
July 6, 1997 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Jack Kramer had more hindsight and less foresight, and if the officials at the All England Club were more forward thinking and less mired in the past, everyone might be getting along much better now. As it is, on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his landmark Wimbledon title, Kramer is comfortable enough to return to the scene of both his greatest victory and his most public humiliation.
SPORTS
July 3, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
Reporting from Wimbledon, England – There was nothing Rafael Nadal could do Sunday about Novak Djokovic. Nadal couldn't stop Djokovic from stretching his limber body to reach from sideline-to-sideline. Nadal couldn't stop Djokovic from creating unrecognizable angles by making the ball go first here, to the left, then here, to the right, then off the baseline where a little dust and dirt and chalk would fly into Nadal's face. And Nadal couldn't stop Djokovic from kissing the Wimbledon turf and nibbling on a piece of grass.
SPORTS
July 6, 2009 | Chuck Culpepper
As a deathless fifth set bloated to 6-6 and to 10-10 and to an inconceivable 14-14, as it elongated to 95 minutes and left the corner scoreboard chockablock with numerals, this latest masterpiece of a Wimbledon final seemed to heave with the audacious aim of rivaling its hallowed predecessor.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
The Irish Republican Army plotted in 1983 to kill Prince Charles and Princess Diana at a rock concert in London, but the attack was foiled because the would-be assassin was also an informant for Irish police and British intelligence, the New York Times reported today. The newspaper identifies the turncoat guerrilla as Sean O'Callaghan, 42, who is serving multiple life sentences for two homicides and 40 other admitted acts of terrorism.
SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relaxed to a state bordering on unconscious after two days of gaming on the Riviera, the U.S. men's Olympic basketball team returned to competition, albeit slowly. The United States got off to its slowest start, but recovered and beat France, 111-71, in an exhibition before a sellout crowd of 2,500 in the airless Stade Louis XV on Tuesday night. The night turned into a love-in for Magic Johnson, with the crowd chanting "Mah-ZHEEK! Mah-ZHEEK!"
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