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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Canada's first $1 coin, a gold-colored piece with 11 sides, was struck Thursday at the Royal Canadian Mint here in Manitoba province.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Putting authors on currency is not a new thing. Benjamin Franklin, a founding father and author of “Poor Richard's Almanac,” is on the U.S. $100 bill, and in Chile the Nobel laureate and poet Gabriela Mistral graces the 5,000 peso bill, which is worth about $10. And Jane Austen will soon grace Britain's 10-pound note . But honoring a living writer on a bill or coin is relatively rare. Alice Munro, 82, who last year won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was actually at the ceremony on Monday in Victoria, Canada, (where she once owned a bookstore)
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | SOLL SUSSMAN, Associated Press
Royal Canadian Mint officials are optimistic that consumers will embrace the "loonie," Canada's new $1 coin, with more enthusiasm than U.S. citizens accepted the Susan B. Anthony dollar. "We looked at the post-mortem," Denis Cudahy, vice president of manufacturing for the mint, said of the U.S. disaster on the Anthony coin. He says the U.S. dollar coin was too close in size to the quarter, confusing consumers, and the public relations campaign wasn't extensive enough before the Susan B.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | SOLL SUSSMAN, Associated Press
Royal Canadian Mint officials are optimistic that consumers will embrace the "loonie," Canada's new $1 coin, with more enthusiasm than U.S. citizens accepted the Susan B. Anthony dollar. "We looked at the post-mortem," Denis Cudahy, vice president of manufacturing for the mint, said of the U.S. disaster on the Anthony coin. He says the U.S. dollar coin was too close in size to the quarter, confusing consumers, and the public relations campaign wasn't extensive enough before the Susan B.
NEWS
September 19, 1985 | Associated Press
The Royal Canadian Mint said Wednesday that it will issue silver commemorative coins to raise money for the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary. The coins will sell in the United States for $28 each.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1987
Thirty-five million new $1 coins have become available for distribution, beginning the end of Canada's $1 bill in a plan the government said will save millions of dollars in production costs because $1 bills wear out more rapidly than coins. The coins are gold-colored and show a loon on one side and Queen Elizabeth II on the other. The coins are being distributed through banks and trust companies throughout Canada, Royal Canadian Mint spokesman Michael Francis said.
NEWS
January 9, 1987 | Associated Press
The Royal Canadian Mint has changed the design of a planned $1 coin after the original master dies were lost and possibly stolen, the government said Thursday. "Though it is very difficult to produce coins just by virtue of possessing the dies, the loss represents a security breach," said a statement from the Cabinet-level official in charge, Monique Vezina. One hundred million new $1 coins, destined to replace the Canadian dollar note, are due to enter circulation in July.
NEWS
April 30, 1987 | DON ALPERT
Question: I was interested in investing in rare coins a couple years ago, but soon realized I would never learn enough about rare coins to be able to make my own purchases and realize a profit in due time. What is your opinion of those companies that advertise to invest in rare coins with them? I have received information from two of these companies. Without naming either company, they both claim a profit between 20%-30% a year over 10 years.--G.S.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | DON ALPERT
Question: I recently inherited several bags of old coins. Among them were many fairly worthless types, like Shield nickels in pretty average shape, old wheat pennies and the like. Because I've had a passing interest in collecting for five years, I decided to try to weed out the junk from the potential finds. Among the more interesting ones was a 1913 Indian-head $2 1/2 gold piece. I have a fairly good idea of what that one might be worth. But a second coin is a mystery to me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1987 | Associated Press
Canada's first $1 coin, a gold-colored piece with 11 sides, was struck Thursday at the Royal Canadian Mint here in Manitoba province.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | Associated Press
Dies used for the most valuable coin minted by the U.S. government were lost or stolen while en route between mints in San Francisco and West Point, N.Y., a Treasury Department official acknowledged Thursday. The Secret Service is investigating the disappearance in January of 24 dies for the front of 1-ounce gold bullion Eagles, said Michael Brown, a spokesman for the U.S. Mint.
NEWS
May 23, 1985 | DON ALPERT
To all of you who write and ask what your coins are worth: This is the weekend you can find out without any guesswork. I can only give general price information in most cases because the condition of a coin is so important in evaluating it. So, if you want specific pricing, the best place to get it is at a coin show where numerous dealers gather in one setting.
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