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Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

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May 21, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Comparisons are irrelevant when two of the world's great orchestras--some would say the two greatest--reinvestigate Dvorak's ubiquitous "New World" Symphony. It is enough to say that, with ideal transparency, perfect balances and splendid directness, these performances by the Berlin and Concertgebouw ensembles do the beloved work justice. Perhaps Abbado's reading is more outgoing, perhaps Harnoncourt's more probing--it hardly matters: This is as wonderful as the old piece can sound.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Immaculate surfaces, well-scrubbed playing and spacious tempos mark these excellent performances, which remain too clean to be considered documents of Brahmsian passion. Buchbinder, a pianist of proven versatility and technical resources, contributes an abundance of pearly, powerful and touching details. He does nothing that one can fail to admire, yet the sweep, drama and spontaneity of this music elude him, as they do the dutiful conductor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Here comes another batch of live Argerich tapes--this time from Amsterdam's resonant Concertgebouw--to feed her fans' insatiable appetite for every note she ever struck. The solo disc, taken from a pair of recitals, is a must-hear, because it often captures Argerich at her fire-eating peak. Bach's Partita No. 2 surges with drama while cleanly delineating each contrapuntal line. Its Sarabande is marvelously limpid, its Rondeau and Capriccio have exceptional staccato clarity and wit.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Comparisons are irrelevant when two of the world's great orchestras--some would say the two greatest--reinvestigate Dvorak's ubiquitous "New World" Symphony. It is enough to say that, with ideal transparency, perfect balances and splendid directness, these performances by the Berlin and Concertgebouw ensembles do the beloved work justice. Perhaps Abbado's reading is more outgoing, perhaps Harnoncourt's more probing--it hardly matters: This is as wonderful as the old piece can sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Two years ago, when conductor Riccardo Chailly became the director of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam, an Italian, not a Dutchman, became sole leader of one of Holland's great cultural treasures and one of the finest orchestras in the world. With the exception of a short stint by German conductor Eugen Jochum as co-director in the early 1960s, this is the first time in the 102-year tradition of the orchestra that someone outside the Netherlands has held that position.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Amsterdam's Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, one of the Netherlands' great cultural treasures and one of the world's most critically acclaimed and recorded orchestras, is an institution steeped in tradition. Ever since the days of Willem Mengelberg, who led the orchestra from 1895 to 1945, the orchestra has honed a signature sound especially admired in music of the late Romantic period.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1997 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To music lovers everywhere, the name Concertgebouw instantly triggers the image of a fine, Old World orchestra, a great among greats, right up there with the Berlin and Vienna philharmonics. For Alexander Kerr, it means even more than that. The 26-year-old violinist--who plays with the Cincinnati Symphony this weekend at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts (Saturday as concertmaster and Sunday as soloist for the Mendelssohn Concerto)--remembers watching a video of the Concertgebouw.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Immaculate surfaces, well-scrubbed playing and spacious tempos mark these excellent performances, which remain too clean to be considered documents of Brahmsian passion. Buchbinder, a pianist of proven versatility and technical resources, contributes an abundance of pearly, powerful and touching details. He does nothing that one can fail to admire, yet the sweep, drama and spontaneity of this music elude him, as they do the dutiful conductor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Here comes another batch of live Argerich tapes--this time from Amsterdam's resonant Concertgebouw--to feed her fans' insatiable appetite for every note she ever struck. The solo disc, taken from a pair of recitals, is a must-hear, because it often captures Argerich at her fire-eating peak. Bach's Partita No. 2 surges with drama while cleanly delineating each contrapuntal line. Its Sarabande is marvelously limpid, its Rondeau and Capriccio have exceptional staccato clarity and wit.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1997 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To music lovers everywhere, the name Concertgebouw instantly triggers the image of a fine, Old World orchestra, a great among greats, right up there with the Berlin and Vienna philharmonics. For Alexander Kerr, it means even more than that. The 26-year-old violinist--who plays with the Cincinnati Symphony this weekend at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts (Saturday as concertmaster and Sunday as soloist for the Mendelssohn Concerto)--remembers watching a video of the Concertgebouw.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Amsterdam's Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, one of the Netherlands' great cultural treasures and one of the world's most critically acclaimed and recorded orchestras, is an institution steeped in tradition. Ever since the days of Willem Mengelberg, who led the orchestra from 1895 to 1945, the orchestra has honed a signature sound especially admired in music of the late Romantic period.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
Two years ago, when conductor Riccardo Chailly became the director of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam, an Italian, not a Dutchman, became sole leader of one of Holland's great cultural treasures and one of the finest orchestras in the world. With the exception of a short stint by German conductor Eugen Jochum as co-director in the early 1960s, this is the first time in the 102-year tradition of the orchestra that someone outside the Netherlands has held that position.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2002
Class of 2002 Berlin Philharmonic ...Simon Rattle New York Philharmonic...Lorin Maazel Royal Opera, London...Antonio Pappano Cleveland Orchestra...Franz Welser-Most Bournemouth Symphony, England...Marin Alsop French National Orchestra, Paris...Kurt Masur Vienna State Opera...Seiji Ozawa Oslo Philharmonic...Andre Previn La Monnaie, Brussels...Kazushi Ono Coming soon Philadelphia Orchestra...Christoph Eschenbach (2003) Boston Symphony...James Levine (2004) Minneapolis Orchestra...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2009 | From A Times Staff Writer
London's Barbican Centre, the largest performing arts center in Europe, has reached agreements with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and four other foreign musical organizations to become its "international associates" -- groups that will have ongoing relationships with the center and that will eventually be in residence there for a time. The others are the Manhattan-based New York Philharmonic and Jazz at Lincoln Center, Amsterdam's Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra from Germany.
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