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June 4, 2004 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
There's Charles Darwin's sextant, Edmund Hillary's oxygen canister and Dr. Livingstone's hat. They are among artifacts, available to the public for the first time, from the archives of the Royal Geographical Society, the 174-year-old British institution that sent explorers to the South Pole, up Mount Everest and in search of the source of the Nile -- and amassed one of the world's largest geographical archives.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2004 | Jill Lawless, Associated Press
There's Charles Darwin's sextant, Edmund Hillary's oxygen canister and Dr. Livingstone's hat. They are among artifacts, available to the public for the first time, from the archives of the Royal Geographical Society, the 174-year-old British institution that sent explorers to the South Pole, up Mount Everest and in search of the source of the Nile -- and amassed one of the world's largest geographical archives.
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TRAVEL
November 24, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Here come the holidays, and with them the season's usual bounty from the publishing industry: coffee-table books. Here are four new travel-related volumes that might make worthy gifts. "Planet Earth" is a book that strikes you between the eyes. Its lures are many, from the richness of the colors in these pictures taken from space to the thrill of spotting a familiar continental profile.
TRAVEL
November 24, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Here come the holidays, and with them the season's usual bounty from the publishing industry: coffee-table books. Here are four new travel-related volumes that might make worthy gifts. "Planet Earth" is a book that strikes you between the eyes. Its lures are many, from the richness of the colors in these pictures taken from space to the thrill of spotting a familiar continental profile.
NEWS
October 25, 2005 | Bernadette Murphy
Flowers in the Snow The Life of Isobel Wylie Hutchinson Gwyneth Hoyle University of Nebraska Press: 269 pp., $18.95 * Back in the 1920s and '30s, when men alone were admitted to the Royal Geographic Society and women were considered too frail to be explorers of merit -- "their sex and their training," it was claimed, rendered them unfit to contribute to scientific geographic knowledge -- Isobel Wylie Hutchinson went her own way.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Movie: "The English Patient" The Setup: A severely ill patient, Count Laszlo de Almasy (Ralph Fiennes), once a dashing Hungarian map maker, reflects on time spent in the North African desert, where he fell in love before the outbreak of World War II. The Costume Designer: Ann Roth, whose credits include "Sabrina" (with Bernie Pollack), "The Birdcage," "Working Girl," "Biloxi Blues" and "Postcards From the Edge."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Sir Wilfred Thesiger, a celebrated British explorer who twice crossed a vast Saudi Arabian desert by camel, lived among the marsh dwellers of southern Iraq and risked his life to discover why Ethiopia's Awash River does not reach the sea, has died. He was 93. Thesiger, who had lived in a retirement home in Coulsdon, England, in recent years, died Sunday in a London hospital. The cause of death was not disclosed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1999
Hank Palmieri, 43, who created National Geographic's feature film division. A member of the New York Explorer's Club and the Royal Geographic Society, Palmieri was a natural to bring drama to the documentaries and nature films of the historic magazine. Educated at London's School of Architecture, he pursued a career as a Los Angeles architect before becoming a production executive at Vista Films.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | SUSAN ELLICOTT, Reuters
Michael Asher and Mariantonietta Peru have just had a honeymoon short on relaxation but long on originality--a 10-month trek with camels across the Sahara. During their 271 days across the world's largest desert, the couple traveled on foot and camel from the Chinguetti Oasis in Mauritania, to the River Nile in Egypt through Mali, Niger, Chad and Sudan. They almost died of thirst, were arrested by police and hounded by baying hyenas that encircled their camp at dusk.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | Karla Starr, Starr is a writer and critic who is working on a book about the subject of vacation.
The Lost City of Z A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon David Grann Doubleday: 352 pp., $27.50 -- For each summit reached or Machu Picchu-like discovery, the history of exploration marks more deaths and failures than can be counted, armies of men after whom nothing was named, who spent their lives chasing after the unnamable. The Amazon -- biodiverse, so unknown, so full of life while having obliterated so many explorers -- has been, for many, that singular, unconquerable thing.
TRAVEL
September 5, 2010
OREGON Happy hiking The four-day "Raft Supported Wilderness Lodge Trip" from Rogue Wilderness Adventures affords the perks of a good hike without the pain. With gear packed on a raft, the trail on a gentle downhill gradient and a lodge (with bed and shower) awaiting every evening, you can focus on the Rogue River Canyon's magnificent fall colors and abundant wildlife as you hike from lodge to lodge. Another option is to experience the journey from the boat and brave the rapids with your gear.
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