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NEWS
August 10, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Time is running out for the original global timekeepers. The six atomic clocks at Britain's oldest scientific institution, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, are running down, and when they stop, an era will end. The observatory that gave the world Greenwich Mean Time, marked the prime meridian and became the ultimate reference point for anyone setting a precision timepiece, will be forced, 312 years after its inception, to ask others what time it is.
NEWS
August 10, 1987 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Time is running out for the original global timekeepers. The six atomic clocks at Britain's oldest scientific institution, the Royal Greenwich Observatory, are running down, and when they stop, an era will end. The observatory that gave the world Greenwich Mean Time, marked the prime meridian and became the ultimate reference point for anyone setting a precision timepiece, will be forced, 312 years after its inception, to ask others what time it is.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989
According to Britain's Royal Greenwich Observatory (Part A, Dec. 19), Dec. 31, 1989, will be one second longer. The very old will be grateful. Youth will not concur. Either way, a happy new year to all! JOSEPH P. KRENGEL Santa Monica
NEWS
December 18, 1989
New Year's Eve party goers around the world will have to wait an extra second before ringing in 1990. Britain's Royal Greenwich Observatory said today that time services across the globe will put back their clocks by one second just before midnight Greenwich Mean Time on Dec. 31 to prevent man-measured time from getting out of step with the Earth's rotation.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | Reuters
New Year's Eve partygoers around the world will have to wait an extra second before ringing in 1990. Britain's Royal Greenwich Observatory said Monday that time services across the globe will put back their clocks by one second just before midnight Greenwich Mean Time Dec. 31 to prevent man-measured time from getting out of step with the earth's rotation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2012 | From a Times staff writer
Wallace L.W. Sargent, a Caltech astrophysicist known for his observations of black holes, quasars and other celestial objects at the farthest reaches of the universe, died Oct. 29 at the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles, according to a Caltech spokesman. He was 77 and had been battling prostate cancer. A professor emeritus of astronomy, Sargent arrived at Caltech from his native Britain in 1959 and spent three years as a research fellow. He returned to the university in 1966 as an assistant professor and became a full professor in 1971.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Astronomers throughout the Southern Hemisphere are keeping watch on a brilliant exploding star in the southern sky, wondering if the show is nearly over or just beginning. Ever since the discovery of the supernova--a giant star going through its final death throes--scientists have been waiting for the star to grow brighter, but it has remained about the same magnitude as when it was first sighted on Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | ROBERT COOKE, NEWSDAY
The clues are, at best, tantalizingly vague, leaving some room for speculation, and much more room for imagination. As chronicled in the Gospel of Matthew: "And lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy." For those who take this sole biblical account of the wise men pursuing the Christmas Star on faith, of course, there is no argument.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL, Richard S. Ginell is a frequent contributor to Calendar
We're in a loft on the third floor of a warehouse somewhere in downtown Los Angeles' bleak, grungy industrial sector, where electronics wholesalers are busy blowing out their stocks in storefronts and loading zones. The loft has been converted into a musicians' paradise, strewn with electronic and acoustic instruments, rack-mounted boxes of electronics, a new Mac G3 laptop computer and a venerable Kimball grand piano tucked away in the corner.
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