Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoyal Literary Fund
IN THE NEWS

Royal Literary Fund

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | MARY BLUME
In these days of state aid, bureaucratically administered and painfully obtained, there is an English group that for nearly 200 years has discreetly helped out writers in their hours (years) of need. "Our purpose," says Arthur Crook, president of the Royal Literary Fund, "is to alleviate hardship." The point of the Fund is not to give someone a grant for a year off to write a novel; other funds do that. "We are a relieving charity for authors who have fallen on very bad times," Crook says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
Within the august British Library, just across from the Magna Charta and a display of Beatle lyrics handwritten by the lads themselves, is an exhibition enforcing the notion that great art is borne from personal pain and suffering. Neatly encased under glass are the letters of great authors begging for money from the Royal Literary Fund, a 300-year-old private organization that aids writers in distress. An embarrassed D. H. Lawrence applied for help in 1918.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1990 | JEFF KAYE
Within the august British Library, just across from the Magna Charta and a display of Beatle lyrics handwritten by the lads themselves, is an exhibition enforcing the notion that great art is borne from personal pain and suffering. Neatly encased under glass are the letters of great authors begging for money from the Royal Literary Fund, a 300-year-old private organization that aids writers in distress. An embarrassed D. H. Lawrence applied for help in 1918.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | MARY BLUME
In these days of state aid, bureaucratically administered and painfully obtained, there is an English group that for nearly 200 years has discreetly helped out writers in their hours (years) of need. "Our purpose," says Arthur Crook, president of the Royal Literary Fund, "is to alleviate hardship." The point of the Fund is not to give someone a grant for a year off to write a novel; other funds do that. "We are a relieving charity for authors who have fallen on very bad times," Crook says.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2002 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time--well, actually 78 years ago--a British playwright named Alan Alexander Milne scribbled some lighthearted verses about a boy and his constant companion, a dimwitted bear who couldn't get enough honey. Winnie the Pooh was an immediate sensation. Milne spent the rest of his life trying to escape the suffocating shadow of his cuddly creation. Even today, people can't get enough of that silly old bear--or his honey. Pooh has become a $1 billion-a-year industry for Walt Disney Co.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|