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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By David Ng
Looking to put a child sex-abuse scandal behind it, the BBC has named a major figure from classical opera as its director general. Tony Hall has served as the chief executive of the Royal Opera House in London since 2001. His job at the BBC is expected to begin in March. Hall's appointment may seem a bit arbitrary at first glance - the equivalent of making the Metropolitan Opera's Peter Gelb the head of CNN. But the hire isn't as random as it appears. Before the Royal Opera House, Hall worked at the BBC for close to 30 years, heading the BBC News for part of that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By David Mermelstein
Though it's been 27 years since the Police disbanded, Stewart Copeland, its American drummer, remains best known for his nine years with the seminal British rock band. But that doesn't mean he hasn't been busy beyond the Police's 2007 reunion tour. From the mid-1980s through the mid-2000s, Copeland was a prolific composer of movie and TV scores. More recently, he's been writing operas and ballets. On May 11, his fourth and latest opera, "The Tell-Tale Heart," based on Edgar Allan Poe's short story of the same name, receives its American premiere at Long Beach Opera, on a bill with another one-act opera.
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NEWS
September 26, 1986 | United Press International
The Royal Opera House in Covent Garden announced today it will apply next week for permission to begin a $79.7-million building program to modernize its famous building while retaining its 19th-Century charm. The plan involves linking all levels of the structure for the first time and building an underground garage and and three-tier shopping halls with arcades that will link it architecturally with the colorful Covent Garden district over which it presides.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2013 | By David Ng
It looks like Christoph Waltz, who won his second Academy Award in February for "Django Unchained," will be taking a career detour into the world of opera later this year. The Austrian-born actor is reportedly set to make his opera directorial debut with a new production of "Der Rosenkavalier" by Richard Strauss. Waltz recently told the German-language newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung that he will helm the production at the Vlaamse Opera in Antwerp, Belgium. The debut is scheduled for Dec. 15, according to the newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Royal Opera House, known as the biggest trouble spot in British arts, apparently has survived its latest crisis of mismanagement and threats to disband the company, which includes the Royal Opera and Royal Ballet. The music and dance company is battered, broke and demoralized, but it is still kicking after tough negotiations this week between the artistic unions and Royal Opera House board of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
It can't possibly surprise anyone that the Royal Opera House in London--where opera or ballet is staged most days of the year, where artists and administrators duke it out the way artists and administrators always do, where big stars parade their big egos the way they always do, where money is an ever-present worry--has its share of backstage dramas.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once derided as an interminable soap opera, a kind of bad dream that wouldn't quit, the Royal Opera House may yet turn out to be a story with a fairy tale ending. As Queen Elizabeth II, British Prime Minister Tony Blair and a host of other prominent guests turned out for a glittering inauguration of the revamped opera house at Covent Garden Wednesday night, "scandal," "beleaguered" and other words normally attached to the home of the Royal Opera and Royal Ballet were nowhere heard.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2006 | Beth Gardiner, Associated Press
An American soprano fired by the Royal Opera House because of her weight has been rehired after undergoing stomach surgery and losing 135 pounds, her spokeswoman and the prestigious theater said Sunday. Deborah Voigt, one of the world's top opera singers, lost her part in Richard Strauss' "Ariadne auf Naxos" in 2004 because the Royal Opera House decided a slimmer singer would be better.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After serving with distinction as chief executive of Independent Television's high-brow Channel 4, Jeremy Isaacs had hoped to become director general of the British Broadcasting Corp. But he was passed over for that job, possibly because he had spent most of his career with a BBC rival. Instead, he received a glittering consolation post: He was tapped to head the Royal Opera House, at Covent Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Colin Davis, the renowned British conductor who worked with the London Symphony Orchestra for many years, has died at 85. A statement from the orchestra said he died on Sunday evening after a brief illness. Davis was the longest-serving principal conductor in the London Symphony's history, having first conducted the group in 1959. He became principal conductor in 1995 and served until 2006. He also served as president of the organization starting in 2007. In addition, Davis had longstanding conducting relationships with Britain's Royal Opera House, the English Chamber Orchestra and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
LONDON - The editor of Opera is worried. The March editorial of Britain's leading opera monthly describes this city's opera scene as being in crisis. The city's major companies - Royal Opera and English National Opera - are in a state of flux, administratively, artistically, musically and, in the case of ENO, financially. Opera everywhere should suffer such crises. On a recent Saturday in the British capital, I couldn't imagine a better place for opera, crises or no crises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2012
Galina Vishnevskaya Russian opera singer, wife of Rostropovich Galina Vishnevskaya, 86, a world-renowned Russian opera diva who with her husband defied the Soviet regime to give shelter to writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn and suffered exile from her homeland, died Tuesday in Moscow. Moscow's Opera Center, which Vishnevskaya created, announced her death but did not state the cause. Vishnevskaya, celebrated internationally for her rich soprano voice, married cellist Mstislav Rostropovich in 1955.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By Sherry Stern
Lisa della Casa, a Swiss-born soprano known for her sweet voice and exquisite elegance, has died at 93, the Vienna Opera announced Tuesday. The late English music critic Sir Neville Cardus reportedly once said of Della Casa that one should go to her concerts twice: once to listen, once to look. The soprano "possessed an instrument of crystalline purity," a Times reviewer wrote about her landmark recording of Richard Strauss' "Four Last Songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By David Ng
Looking to put a child sex-abuse scandal behind it, the BBC has named a major figure from classical opera as its director general. Tony Hall has served as the chief executive of the Royal Opera House in London since 2001. His job at the BBC is expected to begin in March. Hall's appointment may seem a bit arbitrary at first glance - the equivalent of making the Metropolitan Opera's Peter Gelb the head of CNN. But the hire isn't as random as it appears. Before the Royal Opera House, Hall worked at the BBC for close to 30 years, heading the BBC News for part of that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2012 | By David Ng
Composer Michael Nyman is using Facebook to lash out against Britain's Royal Opera House for apparently rejecting his overtures for a new piece. Nyman wrote on his Facebook page that the opera company is refusing to produce any of his future operatic works. The British composer wrote in a post earlier this month that he learned the Royal Opera "will never commission an opera" from him. "Maybe I should withdraw my tax from supporting such public institutions in 'my' country!"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD and JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Tenor Placido Domingo said this week that he's pulling out of five performances this summer at London's Royal Opera House. An opera house spokesman expressed "extreme sorrow" that the Spanish singer would not essay the title role of Wagner's "Lohengrin" in June and July. Domingo, 47, said that he had not sung the role recently and would need more time to prepare. Instead of "Lohengrin," he'll perform in two concerts with the Royal Opera House orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
White opera singers will no longer wear black face paint when playing black characters at the British Royal Opera House. The practice of putting black makeup on white performers was used in dress rehearsals for Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera" (A Masked Ball), but the singer portraying the sorceress Ulrica did not use the makeup in Thursday's opening-night performance, Royal Opera House spokesman Christopher Millard said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Joan Sutherland, the Australian tailor's daughter acclaimed as "La Stupenda" during a nearly 40-year operatic career and rated by many critics as the most powerful and technically perfect diva of the 20th century, has died. She was 83. Sutherland died Sunday at her home near Geneva, Switzerland, after a long illness, her family announced. Sutherland achieved stardom in 1959 with a celebrated turn in the title role of Gaetano Donizetti's "Lucia di Lammermoor" at London's Royal Opera House.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2010 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Philip Langridge, the British tenor who won praise for his vocal versatility and subtle characterization, has died. He was 70. Langridge died Friday after a short battle with cancer, the Royal Opera House announced. His death "leaves a large hole in the world's music," composer Harrison Birtwistle said. Langridge was born Dec. 16, 1939, in Hawkhurst, southern England, and studied at the Royal Academy of Music. He began his career as an orchestral violinist, but turned to singing, making his professional operatic debut in Richard Strauss' "Capriccio" at the Glyndebourne Festival in 1964.
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