Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoyal Shakespeare Company
IN THE NEWS

Royal Shakespeare Company

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1994 | David Colker, David Colker is a staff writer for The Times' Valley edition and writes the Cyburbia column in Life & Style.
For countless students, back-to-school time means an introduction to Shakespeare. This is not welcome news to those who think of his 400-year-old plays only as examples of slow pacing and bad dialogue. Even those who may recognize the Bard's value may have trouble accessing his works. It might not be their fault: Shakespeare productions are often presented as deadly museum pieces that are about as lively as study hall.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
If you can't beat him, join him. This seems to be the strategy the Wooster Group has adopted in tackling Shakespeare again. In 2008 the trailblazing New York troupe brought its production of "Hamlet" to REDCAT and had many people admiring the ghostly video footage of Richard Burton's melancholy Dane and wondering why they weren't getting the benefit of such a commanding lead performance. Now the company is back at REDCAT with "Cry, Trojans! (Troilus & Cressida)," a work that began as a collaboration with the Royal Shakespeare Company and has subsequently evolved into an unthinkable Wooster Group proposition: a production in which the play is decidedly the thing.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1987 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Academy Award-winning British actress Dame Peggy Ashcroft was honored in London this week by directors and fellow actors in a gala 80th birthday party. The show at Old Vic Theater, devised by actor Tony Church of the Royal Shakespeare Company, featured excerpts from plays and speeches with which Ashcroft has been associated, and concluded with two standing ovations as she recited the epilogue to Shakespeare's "As You Like It." "Peggy will be remembered as a great, great actress . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Anne Barton, one of the 20th century's foremost Shakespeare scholars, died Monday in Cambridge, England.  She was 80 years old. The announcement was made by Cambridge University, where she was an emeritus professor of English and fellow of Trinity College.  An American who grew up in Westchester County, New York, Bobbyann Roesen set sail for England after graduating from Bryn Mawr in 1954 and spent most of her life on the native soil of her...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Royal Shakespeare Company actors will be going back to school for master classes in performance with the University of Warwick as a part of a new theater study center. The Higher Education Funding Council for England awarded $8.5 million to enable the world-famous theater to join the university to create a learning center for students, the teaching staff and the professional actors, it was announced Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Anne Barton, one of the 20th century's foremost Shakespeare scholars, died Monday in Cambridge, England. She was 80. Cambridge University, where she was an emeritus professor of English and fellow of Trinity College, announced her death but gave no other details. An American who studied at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, Barton spent most of her life on the native soil of her great subject, William Shakespeare. As an undergraduate, she published in Shakespeare Quarterly the essay "Love's Labour's Lost," the last paragraph of which contained, in her own words, "the germ" of what became her most important book, "Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play" (1962)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By David Ng
The play is more than 400 years old and we all know how it ends, but suddenly William Shakespeare's "Macbeth" is back in vogue. The Scottish tragedy is enticing a number of actors ranging from young to the far side of middle age to play the murderous Thane of Cawdor. On stage, Ethan Hawke is to headline a new production of the play scheduled to open Nov. 21 at Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theatre. Hawke follows Alan Cumming who brought his experimental "Macbeth" to Broadway last season.
TRAVEL
December 25, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
A visit to Stratford-upon-Avon in England next year and in 2007 will be anything but routine. The Bard's birthplace, about 100 miles northwest of London, is the stage for the Royal Shakespeare Company's most ambitious festival ever. All of William Shakespeare's plays will be presented over a yearlong period starting April 6. Besides 15 productions by the resident company, more than 40 visiting troupes from 18 countries, including the U.S., India, Japan and South Africa, will participate.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Broadway will get a concentrated dose of comedy and tragedy this fall - brought on by acclaimed British actor Mark Rylance. The two-time Tony winner - formerly artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe in London - will star in Globe productions of “Twelfth Night” and “Richard III, ” which will rotate in repertory for a 16-week engagement at New York's Belasco Theatre, said producers Sonia Friedman and Scott Landis. The productions first opened at the Globe last summer and later transferred to the West End; Rylance received rave reviews for his leading roles as "Twelfth Night's" lovesick, wealthy countess Olivia and the titular, scheming Richard III. British actor-author Stephen Fry will make his Broadway acting debut opposite Rylance, playing Malvolio, in "Twelfth Night.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Five actors doing "As You Like It" sounds like a stunt. As a matter of fact, it is a stunt. The surprise is that it can also be the play. The surprise Wednesday night at Occidental College was a little less than last year, when another five-person squad from the Royal Shakespeare Company first pulled the trick with "Twelfth Night." Still, this is a dazzling demonstration of how little it takes to conjure up a play, given actors who know how to play. (See Page 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2013 | Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Anne Barton, one of the 20th century's foremost Shakespeare scholars, died Monday in Cambridge, England. She was 80. Cambridge University, where she was an emeritus professor of English and fellow of Trinity College, announced her death but gave no other details. An American who studied at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, Barton spent most of her life on the native soil of her great subject, William Shakespeare. As an undergraduate, she published in Shakespeare Quarterly the essay "Love's Labour's Lost," the last paragraph of which contained, in her own words, "the germ" of what became her most important book, "Shakespeare and the Idea of the Play" (1962)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2013 | By David Ng
The play is more than 400 years old and we all know how it ends, but suddenly William Shakespeare's "Macbeth" is back in vogue. The Scottish tragedy is enticing a number of actors ranging from young to the far side of middle age to play the murderous Thane of Cawdor. On stage, Ethan Hawke is to headline a new production of the play scheduled to open Nov. 21 at Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theatre. Hawke follows Alan Cumming who brought his experimental "Macbeth" to Broadway last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Broadway will get a concentrated dose of comedy and tragedy this fall - brought on by acclaimed British actor Mark Rylance. The two-time Tony winner - formerly artistic director of Shakespeare's Globe in London - will star in Globe productions of “Twelfth Night” and “Richard III, ” which will rotate in repertory for a 16-week engagement at New York's Belasco Theatre, said producers Sonia Friedman and Scott Landis. The productions first opened at the Globe last summer and later transferred to the West End; Rylance received rave reviews for his leading roles as "Twelfth Night's" lovesick, wealthy countess Olivia and the titular, scheming Richard III. British actor-author Stephen Fry will make his Broadway acting debut opposite Rylance, playing Malvolio, in "Twelfth Night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
John Caird, who's directing the L.A. Opera production of "Tosca" that opens Saturday, played crucial roles in launching two of the biggest stage blockbusters of modern times. The fact that the British director remains somewhat below the radar, at least in America, speaks volumes about the difference between having blockbuster directing credentials on stage, as opposed to on screen. In 1980, Caird teamed with Trevor Nunn to direct the Royal Shakespeare Company's 81/2 -hour theatrical adaptation of Charles Dickens' "Nicholas Nickleby," scripted by David Edgar.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
If it weren't for Adrian Noble's poor eyesight, Southern Californians might not be gaining new insights into William Shakespeare this summer. As a lad growing up in Chichester, England, Noble, the future artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, was afflicted with myopia. One day when his optician was "poking about in my eye," he told Noble about his improbable plan to start a world-class theater festival right there in Chichester, featuring some of Britain's best actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Adrian Noble got roughed up a bit toward the end of his tenure as the Bard's man in Britain -- he left in 2003 after 13 years as artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, his plans for tearing down its main stage in Stratford-upon-Avon and building a more contemporary facility having drawn slings and arrows from the media and the arts community. Noble, 58, is eager to have another go at leading a company of Shakespearean actors, this time at San Diego's Old Globe. Noble has been named artistic director of next year's annual Shakespeare Festival, consisting of three summer productions at the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre in Balboa Park, the theater announced Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
If the commercial theaters in London's West End are finding it hard to present new shows with popular appeal, their problems seem trivial compared to the woes of the government-funded Royal Shakespeare Company. The RSC, with a current 2.9-million ($4.8-million) deficit, is closing its two London theaters, the Barbican and the adjacent Pit, for four months in November to cut costs. "It seems we have no other option," said Terry Hands, RSC artistic director and chief executive.
TRAVEL
December 25, 2005 | Jane Engle, Times Staff Writer
A visit to Stratford-upon-Avon in England next year and in 2007 will be anything but routine. The Bard's birthplace, about 100 miles northwest of London, is the stage for the Royal Shakespeare Company's most ambitious festival ever. All of William Shakespeare's plays will be presented over a yearlong period starting April 6. Besides 15 productions by the resident company, more than 40 visiting troupes from 18 countries, including the U.S., India, Japan and South Africa, will participate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2005 | Philip Boroff, Bloomberg News
In April, the Royal Shakespeare Company begins what the Guardian newspaper calls an "orgy of Bardstuff." Over the next year, Patrick Stewart, Judi Dench and about 500 other actors will celebrate the world's most famous playwright by performing every word he wrote. The "Complete Works" features some 50 productions covering all 37 of William Shakespeare's plays, from lesser- known works such as "The Two Noble Kinsmen" and "The Rape of Lucrece" to "Hamlet," "Macbeth" and other classics.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|