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Royal Ulster Constabulary

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NEWS
March 22, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On May 4, 1973, a sniper shot Constable Jim Seymour in the head as he opened the gate to a fortified police station. For more than two decades, he lay paralyzed in a coma, a painful symbol in a long line of police casualties from this land's sectarian warfare. There may never have been a more dangerous place to be a cop than the gritty streets of Belfast. Across 25 bloody years, officers of the Royal Ulster Constabulary were murdered at an average of one a month.
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NEWS
June 27, 2012 | By Michael McGough
I'm an Anglophile but not a monarchist, so I didn't immerse myself in media coverage of Queen Elizabeth II's diamond jubilee. But I did pay attention to reports about the queen's politically consequential handshake with Martin McGuinness, the deputy first minister of Northern Ireland's power-sharing government. With this difficult act, the queen vindicated the sometimes sappy tributes to her service to her subjects. McGuinness isn't just any politician. As The Times reported, McGuinness  was a commander of the Irish Republican Army in the 1970s when the terrorist group blew up the yacht of the queen's cousin, Lord Mountbatten, killing him and three others.
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NEWS
August 24, 1986
Gunmen shot and seriously wounded a police reservist on foot patrol in a predominantly Protestant area of Northern Ireland, a spokesman for the Royal Ulster Constabulary said. The spokesman said gunmen opened fire from a passing car on the policeman in Ballymena's North Road, in County Antrim 15 miles north of Belfast.
OPINION
February 3, 2007
Re "Are its Troubles over?" editorial, Jan. 30 This editorial states that the police in Northern Ireland "arrested and killed many Roman Catholics over the decades in which they fought for Northern Ireland's independence from Britain." In fact, during the period of "the Troubles" from 1969 to 1998, the Royal Ulster Constabulary was responsible for 55 deaths. Over the same period, the Irish Republican Army killed more than 1,700 people. The IRA killed more Roman Catholics than the constabulary and British army combined.
OPINION
June 29, 1997
Re "Message From the Dark Side," editorial, June 18: The murder of two young members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Lurgan, Northern Ireland, is a terrible tragedy in a tragic land. On April 26 Robert Hamil, a Catholic man, was savagely beaten by a loyalist mob as the Royal Ulster Constabulary stood by. Robert Hamil died May 8. Another trag- edy. On May 12, a loyalist death squad murdered Sean Brown, a 62-year-old Catholic father of six. Another tragedy. These are only a few of the tragedies that go on year after year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999
To improve policing in turbulent Northern Ireland is no easy undertaking, but that was the task set forth in the Good Friday agreement, achieved in multi-party negotiations in April 1998. The job fell to former Hong Kong Gov. Chris Patten, and he has now released a report with 175 recommendations that could help set the foundation for policing in a time of peace.
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Two policemen, one a high-ranking officer in the Royal Ulster Constabulary, were found shot to death today near the border with the Irish Republic, bringing this year's death toll in Northern Ireland to 26. The bodies of the two men were found in County Armagh in an unmarked car only yards from the border at the Catholic village of Jonesborough, police said. A spokesman at constabulary headquarters said no further details were available.
NEWS
January 20, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to stave off another crisis in the Northern Ireland peace process, the British government announced Wednesday that it will overhaul the province's Royal Ulster Constabulary and rename the largely Protestant police force in an attempt to draw more Roman Catholics. The RUC, as it is called, will lose its "royal" designation next year for a more neutral name: the Police Service of Northern Ireland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1999
To improve policing in turbulent Northern Ireland is no easy undertaking, but that was the task set forth in the Good Friday agreement, achieved in multi-party negotiations in April 1998. The job fell to former Hong Kong Gov. Chris Patten, and he has now released a report with 175 recommendations that could help set the foundation for policing in a time of peace.
OPINION
June 29, 1997
Re "Message From the Dark Side," editorial, June 18: The murder of two young members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Lurgan, Northern Ireland, is a terrible tragedy in a tragic land. On April 26 Robert Hamil, a Catholic man, was savagely beaten by a loyalist mob as the Royal Ulster Constabulary stood by. Robert Hamil died May 8. Another trag- edy. On May 12, a loyalist death squad murdered Sean Brown, a 62-year-old Catholic father of six. Another tragedy. These are only a few of the tragedies that go on year after year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1997
That the British consul general (letter, May 14) dismisses the IRA as a terrorist group not entitled to the label of "army" is not surprising. The very fact that he purports to speak for every resident of Britain and Ireland speaks volumes. Since 1975, the British government has gone to great lengths to paint the republican movement as one of criminal element rather than civil rebellion. And it goes without question that any military action that is not state-sanctioned bears the label of "terrorism."
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On May 4, 1973, a sniper shot Constable Jim Seymour in the head as he opened the gate to a fortified police station. For more than two decades, he lay paralyzed in a coma, a painful symbol in a long line of police casualties from this land's sectarian warfare. There may never have been a more dangerous place to be a cop than the gritty streets of Belfast. Across 25 bloody years, officers of the Royal Ulster Constabulary were murdered at an average of one a month.
NEWS
July 2, 1989
Gunmen shot and killed an off-duty police officer and wounded his 80-year-old mother while he was visiting her at her home in the Northern Ireland town of Garvagh, 40 miles northwest of Belfast. The woman was wounded in the abdomen. The officer, who was due to retire this month, had been in the Royal Ulster Constabulary for 34 years and normally carried out courthouse duties in Belfast.
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Two policemen, one a high-ranking officer in the Royal Ulster Constabulary, were found shot to death today near the border with the Irish Republic, bringing this year's death toll in Northern Ireland to 26. The bodies of the two men were found in County Armagh in an unmarked car only yards from the border at the Catholic village of Jonesborough, police said. A spokesman at constabulary headquarters said no further details were available.
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