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SPORTS
June 25, 1993 | Associated Press
Royals Stadium in Kansas City will officially be renamed in honor of ailing owner Ewing Kauffman on July 2, the team said Thursday. The stadium will be named Ewing M. Kauffman Stadium in a pregame ceremony. * After 17 seasons and 2,607 games, a Seattle Mariner hit for the cycle Wednesday. Jay Buhner completed it with a 14th-inning triple, then scored on a wild pitch for the winning run in an 8-7 victory over Oakland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1995 | DAVID R. BAKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Efforts to build a football stadium at Royal High School have taken some hits over the years: failed bond measures, concern about unstable soil under the proposed field, debates on the relative merits of grass and artificial turf. But those efforts, under way since the school opened in 1968, finally produced their first few clods of moved earth Thursday when school district officials gathered to break ground for the stadium.
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SPORTS
October 19, 1985
Will someone please move that annoying organ at Royals Stadium. It is too close to the TV microphones. Or should I turn off the television sound and turn on the radio? ADAM KUCIA Canoga Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1995 | LISA M. BOWMAN
Royal High School could see a new stadium as early as next fall. But some sports fans say stadium plans approved by the Simi Valley Unified school board Tuesday night were a far cry from the original plans. The board had to cut out some amenities, such as a ticket booth and state-of-the-art running track, eliminated 850 seats and put out the project to new bidders after original cost estimates submitted by construction companies in August ran more than $3 million.
SPORTS
August 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
Ewing M. Kauffman, the self-made billionaire who founded the Kansas City Royals, died in his sleep overnight, the team said Sunday. He was 76 and had announced on May 19 that he had bone cancer. Kauffman, known to many in baseball as "Mr. K," died at home. Kauffman was too ill to attend a July 2 ceremony at which Royals Stadium was renamed Ewing M. Kauffman Stadium. His wife, Muriel, attended in his place.
SPORTS
May 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Kansas City Royals co-owner Ewing Kauffman said today he has received a proposal from the other co-owner that could result in Kauffman's reacquiring 100% of the team this year. Avron Fogelman, a Memphis real estate developer, bought into the team in 1983 when Kauffman, the team founder, was thought to have serious health problems. In the last two years, Fogelman's financial situation has markedly deteriorated and Kauffman admitted today that their personal relationship has also soured.
NEWS
October 24, 1985 | ALAN DROOZ
Kansas City Royals star George Brett came up for his first at-bat in the World Series last weekend and the decibel level of the crowd doubled. People in K.C. hats yelled encouragement and assured each other, "This is it." But the site was not Royals Stadium in Kansas City. It was Kansas City transplanted to Hermosa Beach, where a partisan crowd was rooting for Brett in his own restaurant, C.J. Brett's.
SPORTS
February 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Kansas City Royals completed their off-season overhaul Friday by sending Gregg Jefferies--the centerpiece of a major trade last winter--to St. Louis for outfielder Felix Jose. Jose, who batted .295 with 14 home runs and 75 runs batted in in 131 games last year, will play right field and be asked to provide some much-needed punch in the middle of the lineup. The Cardinals included infielder Craig Wilson in the deal, and the Royals threw in minor league outfielder Ed Gerald.
SPORTS
June 22, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
There are some games that have the look of disaster written on their scorecards. Games where hits fall as easily as summer rains, where earned-run averages inflate and managers wish they had taken their cousin's advice and gone into aluminum siding sales. Saturday night's game between the Angels and the Kansas City Royals began with such a blemished look.
SPORTS
April 22, 1989 | KENT BAKER, The Baltimore Sun
When the need arose for a pinch runner in the 13th inning of Tuesday night's game, Kansas City Manager John Wathan didn't hesitate. He called for Bret Saberhagen. Playing in his third consecutive game, a rarity for a starting pitcher, Saberhagen scored what proved to be the winning run in a 7-4 victory over the Baltimore Orioles. So, in effect, Thursday's Kansas City starter has already beaten the Orioles twice. Ten days ago at Royals Stadium, Saberhagen pitched the best game by an opponent this season, facing only two Orioles over the minimum in a 3-0, three-hit triumph.
SPORTS
August 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
Ewing M. Kauffman, the self-made billionaire who founded the Kansas City Royals, died in his sleep overnight, the team said Sunday. He was 76 and had announced on May 19 that he had bone cancer. Kauffman, known to many in baseball as "Mr. K," died at home. Kauffman was too ill to attend a July 2 ceremony at which Royals Stadium was renamed Ewing M. Kauffman Stadium. His wife, Muriel, attended in his place.
SPORTS
June 25, 1993 | Associated Press
Royals Stadium in Kansas City will officially be renamed in honor of ailing owner Ewing Kauffman on July 2, the team said Thursday. The stadium will be named Ewing M. Kauffman Stadium in a pregame ceremony. * After 17 seasons and 2,607 games, a Seattle Mariner hit for the cycle Wednesday. Jay Buhner completed it with a 14th-inning triple, then scored on a wild pitch for the winning run in an 8-7 victory over Oakland.
SPORTS
February 13, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Kansas City Royals completed their off-season overhaul Friday by sending Gregg Jefferies--the centerpiece of a major trade last winter--to St. Louis for outfielder Felix Jose. Jose, who batted .295 with 14 home runs and 75 runs batted in in 131 games last year, will play right field and be asked to provide some much-needed punch in the middle of the lineup. The Cardinals included infielder Craig Wilson in the deal, and the Royals threw in minor league outfielder Ed Gerald.
SPORTS
May 3, 1990 | From Associated Press
Kansas City Royals co-owner Ewing Kauffman said today he has received a proposal from the other co-owner that could result in Kauffman's reacquiring 100% of the team this year. Avron Fogelman, a Memphis real estate developer, bought into the team in 1983 when Kauffman, the team founder, was thought to have serious health problems. In the last two years, Fogelman's financial situation has markedly deteriorated and Kauffman admitted today that their personal relationship has also soured.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | Gene Wojciechowski
Two of the American League's best outfielders were here Friday evening, though you'd never know it by the most recent All-Star game voting results. One of them, the fabled Bo Jackson, is on a first-name basis with America, a cover boy, a two-pro sport letterman. The other, Devon White, is apparently baseball's invisible man, a no-show in a strange popularity contest that allows an injured Jose Canseco (wrist surgery) or a slump-ridden Fred Lynn (disabled bat) to attract more votes than someone who owns a Gold Glove and is among the leaders in seven American League offensive categories.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
He hit a ball in Arlington, Tex., that nearly touched down in Dallas. He threw out Seattle's Harold Reynolds from the warning track on the fly, turning a certain sacrifice fly into a Kansas City Royals' legend. He bounced routine grounders to shortstop and wound up stomping on first base, waiting on the throw. Now, if Bo Jackson can learn to pull the ball, he just might be a player. Friday night, the Angels and their American League earned-run average leader, Kirk McCaskill, ran into Bo, the man and the myth, and ended up contributing another chapter.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
He hit a ball in Arlington, Tex., that nearly touched down in Dallas. He threw out Seattle's Harold Reynolds from the warning track on the fly, turning a certain sacrifice fly into a Kansas City Royals' legend. He bounced routine grounders to shortstop and wound up stomping on first base, waiting on the throw. Now, if Bo Jackson can learn to pull the ball, he just might be a player. Friday night, the Angels and their American League earned-run average leader, Kirk McCaskill, ran into Bo, the man and the myth, and ended up contributing another chapter.
SPORTS
May 7, 1989 | TONY KORNHEISER, Washington Post
Scanning the American League leaders, the name you see most regularly is Bo Jackson's. Bo is first in home runs, second in both runs scored and runs batted in, and fourth in stolen bases. However, Bo invariably starts as fast as treated charcoal. Two years ago he catapulted through April with 15 RBIs and a .324 average. Last year Bo had a swell April--four homers, 11 RBIs--then was a cyclone in May: .330, five dingers, 19 RBIs. This April, his eight homers, 20 RBIs and nine steals, was more of the same.
SPORTS
May 7, 1989 | TONY KORNHEISER, Washington Post
Scanning the American League leaders, the name you see most regularly is Bo Jackson's. Bo is first in home runs, second in both runs scored and runs batted in, and fourth in stolen bases. However, Bo invariably starts as fast as treated charcoal. Two years ago he catapulted through April with 15 RBIs and a .324 average. Last year Bo had a swell April--four homers, 11 RBIs--then was a cyclone in May: .330, five dingers, 19 RBIs. This April, his eight homers, 20 RBIs and nine steals, was more of the same.
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