Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoyalties
IN THE NEWS

Royalties

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1995
It is unbelievable that The Times could run a cover story on the subject of royalties ("The Bucks Start Here," by Diane Haithman, Nov. 5) and not mention the assault on federal copyright law currently being waged by Republicans in Congress via HR 789, the so-called "Fairness in Musical Licensing Act of 1995" and its companion bill in the Senate, S 1137. The intent of these bills is to declare music "incidental" to thousands of the businesses who currently license music, thus exempting them from payment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 8, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Turns out that for Apple Inc., being one of the most innovative companies on the planet does have at least one big drawback. The Cupertino, Calif., company says it is the No. 1 target for so-called patent trolls. In court and regulatory filings, Apple provided a rare look at the amount of litigation it is facing from companies whose main business involves threatening to file patent lawsuits against other companies unless they agree to make royalty payments. Apple has faced nearly 100 such lawsuits in the last three years, according to the documents.
Advertisement
OPINION
November 20, 2009
The founders gave Congress the power to bestow on authors and inventors exclusive rights to the use of their work, and those rights have been expanding ever since. Among other things, lawmakers have stretched copyrights to cover not only the reproduction of original works but their performance in public. But that expansion has benefited some creators and not others. When it comes to music, songwriters have broad performance rights, but recording artists do not. As a consequence, businesses that play music to help attract or entertain customers pay royalties only to songwriters, not to the bands and labels whose recordings they use. Musicians and record companies have been trying to obtain performance rights since the 1930s, when bandleader Fred Waring sued a radio station in Pennsylvania for playing one of his recordings on the air. He ultimately lost the case, and subsequent standard-bearers for the cause (Frank Sinatra among them)
WORLD
February 8, 2014 | By Lauren Frayer
MADRID -- Testifying in the first-ever criminal proceeding against a member of Spain's royal family, the king's youngest daughter Saturday denied involvement in her husband's business dealings, lawyers said following the lengthy closed-door session. The princess, Infanta Cristina, and her husband, former Olympian-turned-businessman Iñaki Urdangarin, are under investigation for possible tax fraud and money-laundering. Their legal woes have sent the Spanish royal family's approval rating to all-time lows amid soaring unemployment and calls for 76-year-old King Juan Carlos to abdicate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
You can almost hear the sighs of relief coming from art galleries and auction houses up and down California: Federal Judge Jacqueline Nguyen has declared the California Resale Royalty Act unconstitutional. The highly controversial, widely misunderstood and little enforced state law that took effect in 1977 was designed to provide artists with 5% of their resale prices under certain conditions. As written, the law would apply to a resale of an original work of art provided this sale takes place in California or the seller resides in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Joe Flint
The recording industry's top lobbyist gave a thumbs up to radio giant Clear Channel Media's unprecedented deal with country music label Big Machine (Taylor Swift, Tim McGraw) that will pay performers royalties when their songs are played on the radio. "We're obviously delighted that the biggest radio group acknowledged that something should be done," said Cary Sherman, chairman and CEO of the Recording Industry Assn. of America .  Sherman made his remarks at a congressional hearing called "The Future of Audio" held Wednesday by the House Subcommittee on Communications and Technology  The music industry and radio broadcasters have fought for almost a century over paying artists royalties when their songs are played.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
A group of music publishers, including Warner/Chappell Music Inc., has sued Fullscreen Inc., which operates thousands of YouTube channels, over copyrighted songs in the digital media company's music videos.  The Culver City-based Fullscreen, which has helped boost the popularity of many YouTube stars , has built more than 15,000 channels with 200 million subscribers and gets about 2.5 billion views a month. In a complaint filed in a New York federal court Tuesday, the National Music Publishers' Assn.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2002 | Jon Healey
TECHNOLOGY * The U.S. Copyright Office refused to suspend the requirement that over-the-air radio stations pay royalties to labels and artists for the songs they broadcast over the Internet. As a consequence, stations that simulcast on the Web will have to pay four years' worth of back royalties Oct. 20. The National Assn. of Broadcasters and seven major radio chains have challenged the royalties requirement in court, and they sought the suspension because their appeal still is pending.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2000 | (Dow Jones)
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Monday that it plans to reinvest a large part of its royalties from a therapy for the chronic liver disease hepatitis C in its research and development program. The Costa Mesa drug maker said in a press release that it will invest in a program to develop its existing library of nucleosides and nucleotides and in new initiatives. Nucleosides and nucleotides are subunits of DNA. Schering-Plough Corp. has rights to market ICN's oral ribavirin for hepatitis C.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from an influential lawmaker, record labels and Internet broadcasters moved closer Tuesday to a compromise on royalties that could help small online radio stations stay in business. The record labels' proposals, however, struck some Webcasters as presenting a painful choice: They could stay small and qualify for reduced royalties, or grow and be hit with fees that only the largest companies could afford to pay. House Judiciary Committee Chairman F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By August Brown
The Canadian industrial band Skinny Puppy has made a three-decade career out of punishing electronic sounds. But it's always intended the pain to be voluntary. However, after the band learned of rumors that the U.S. military had used Skinny Puppy music to torment suspected terrorists at the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, a member of the group sent an invoice to the military for "royalties," according to the BBC  and other outlets. The amount? A heavy-metal-appropriate $666,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Despite Ryan Seacrest spending hours on the red carpet talking couture lifestyle with platinum-selling music stars, it was the artists who celebrated second-hand culture who busted through the pomp to win many of the 56th Grammy Awards' most coveted trophies. In fact, at times the ceremony Sunday at Los Angeles' Staples Center felt like a night for the underdogs - at least as much as anyone standing before millions of viewers on music's biggest stage can be considered such. A young woman from New Zealand, Lorde, who this time last year was gigging at small clubs, arrived in a no-name sleeveless tee to celebrate diamondless lives in "Royals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Four years after his death, Michael Jackson has shown no signs of slowing down. In the last year, the late king of pop has earned $160 million, making him Forbes' top-earning dead celebrity . The Cirque du Soleil spectacles “Immortal” and “One” -- both anchored by Jackson's ubiquitous discography -- are currently dazzling audiences, and his hits have been repackaged in numerous compilations. But it's the way Jackson's music has been used to bolster posthumous projects that has drawn the ire of one of his most well-known collaborators and sparked a multimillion-dollar lawsuit.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
(Warning: Episode 4 spoilers ahead!) A few minutes into the pivotal scene in Sunday's "Homeland" between Carrie Mathison and the mysterious lawyer for the Iranians, I turned to my wife and said: "She's setting him up. "  I don't claim any powers of clairvoyance or any special skills at dramaturgy. But I am a fan of "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold," the 1963 novel that made  John le Carré a household name . And this narrative twist comes right out of that book. Readers of "The Spy" will remember that the title character, Alec Leamas, goes utterly to seed to smoke out a Soviet espionage recruiter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
The city of Whittier and a conservation group have reached an agreement to allow a controversial oil-drilling project under a nature preserve, a proposal that immediately drew fire from opponents. Under the settlement, the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority, a regional government entity dedicated to preserving open space and wildlife, is to receive up to $11.25 million a year from the city of Whittier's royalties from the oil. The authority will use the money to buy and preserve land elsewhere in the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Joseph Serna
A hot-air balloon crash that killed the patriarch of a prominent Malibu family occurred when the craft floated into power lines and fell 165 feet to the ground, police said. Grant Adamson, a scion of Malibu's founding family, died early Tuesday when the hot-air balloon carrying him and his family crashed near the western Swiss town of Montbovon. Swiss police said the Adamsons were on a vacation outing when the balloon crashed after a two-hour flight from the town of Chateau-d'Oex.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1997 | (Associated Press)
Rollerblade Inc. founder Scott Olson has filed a lawsuit accusing the company's current owner of failing to pay him royalties on foreign sales of in-line skates. Olson's lawsuit names Rollerblade; the company's current owner and Italian ski-equipment maker, Nordica; and Robert Naegele Jr., who bought out Olson in 1985. The suit does not say how much Olson believes he is owed, but Olson's attorney, Craig Greenberg, said he estimates it to be about $3 million.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Internet radio broadcasters were dealt a setback Monday when a panel of copyright judges threw out requests to reconsider a ruling that hiked the royalties they must pay to record companies and artists. A broad group of public and private broadcasters, including radio stations, small start-up companies, National Public Radio and major online sites like Yahoo Inc. and Time Warner Inc.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
A group of music publishers, including Warner/Chappell Music Inc., has sued Fullscreen Inc., which operates thousands of YouTube channels, over copyrighted songs in the digital media company's music videos.  The Culver City-based Fullscreen, which has helped boost the popularity of many YouTube stars , has built more than 15,000 channels with 200 million subscribers and gets about 2.5 billion views a month. In a complaint filed in a New York federal court Tuesday, the National Music Publishers' Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
After her recent unmasking as the writer behind the pseudonym Robert Gailbraith and the crime novel "The Cuckoo's Calling," J.K. Rowling announced Wednesday -- her birthday -- that the worldwide publishing royalties from the book will be donated to The Soldiers' Charity, a British charity that provides support for soldiers, former soldiers and their families. The central character in “The Cuckoo's Calling” is a soldier, and in a statement Rowling explained , "This donation is being made to The Soldiers' Charity partly as a thank you to the Army people who helped me with research, but also because writing a hero who is a veteran has given me an even greater appreciation and understanding of exactly how much this charity does for ex-servicemen and their families, and how much that support is needed.” She plans to contribute net profits from the book for three years, beginning with the date Rowling was revealed as the true author of “The Cuckoo's Calling.” This decision was made public after Rowling brought legal proceedings against Chris Gossage, who is a partner at Rowling's law firm, and his friend Judith Callegari.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|