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Roz Wyman

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MAGAZINE
August 13, 2000 | DAVE LESHER, Dave Lesher is an Assistant Political Editor on the National Desk
I'm trying to get Roz Wyman to crack, to join the rest of us in our rant about a political system that has run amok. * What about the Buddhist temple? I ask. And soft money and impeachment and independent counsels and PACs and the Lincoln Bedroom? I could keep going, but this isn't making a dent. * What about Social Security, she counters. And what about Medicare? What about my senator--Dianne Feinstein? "Do you want a hero?
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MAGAZINE
September 10, 2000
The story about Roz Wyman was such a wonderful, nostalgic visit back to growing up in Los Angeles ("The Unsinkable Roz Wyman," by Dave Lesher, Aug. 13). I always felt that I knew Wyman because parents and teachers constantly pointed to her during the 1950s and '60s and said, "You should grow up to be that kind of hard worker." She was a role model before any of us knew what role models were. Yet we knew that she was working hard at City Hall and bringing real baseball to our city. It's good to see that Wyman's pioneering efforts and community leadership are still appreciated and recognized, and that the love affair between the Dodgers and their No. 1 fan continues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992
Neil Diamond's first No. 1 single (at least as listed in Billboard magazine) was "Cracklin' Rosie" in 1970, not "Song Sung Blue," as Diamond recalls in the story. I was program director at CKLW in Detroit from 1967 to 1970. Our music director was Rosalie Trombley. She was always eager to add Neil's records to the playlist, and we did. Neil and Rosalie developed a professional high regard for each other. The "Rosie" in "Cracklin' Rosie" was his dedication to her. In 1984, Roz Wyman, chairperson for the Democratic National Convention, and I visited Bill Graham to enlist him to produce the entertainment for the party's San Francisco convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992
Neil Diamond's first No. 1 single (at least as listed in Billboard magazine) was "Cracklin' Rosie" in 1970, not "Song Sung Blue," as Diamond recalls in the story. I was program director at CKLW in Detroit from 1967 to 1970. Our music director was Rosalie Trombley. She was always eager to add Neil's records to the playlist, and we did. Neil and Rosalie developed a professional high regard for each other. The "Rosie" in "Cracklin' Rosie" was his dedication to her. In 1984, Roz Wyman, chairperson for the Democratic National Convention, and I visited Bill Graham to enlist him to produce the entertainment for the party's San Francisco convention.
NEWS
March 26, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Barbie is coming. Paris-based designer Billy Boy is arriving May 1 with his two extraordinary Barbie collections--one of 300 Barbie dolls dressed by world-famous designers (Mary McFadden, Bill Blass, Sonia Rykiel, Guy Larouche, you-name-it), the other of 400 of his own dolls representing the history of Barbie, 1959 to au courant.
MAGAZINE
November 4, 1990 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, Huneven is a Times restaurant critic.
ON SUNDAY NIGHTS IN LOS ANGELES IN THE EARLY '60s, THE BEST FOOD AND THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS COMPANY IN TOWN COULD BE FOUND AT THE HOME OF GENE AND ROZ WYMAN. That was especially true if you happened to be a Democrat. Gene Wyman was the Democratic state chairman, a National Committee member and, according to many, the best fund-raiser in America. Roz Wyman was L.A.'s first City Councilwoman, vice president of Screen Gems/Columbia Studios and the woman who brought the Dodgers to town.
NEWS
December 9, 1985 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth picked up the Scopus Award from the American Friends of Hebrew University on Thursday night--and managed to coyly keep alive rumors about a possible political move while proving he's a guy who can always take control. The glamorous crowd, estimated at 1,100, paid $1,200 a couple to listen to a lengthy introduction by Howard Cosell on a tri-tiered dais, a few speeches and a Grammy-worthy performance by Johnny Mathis.
OPINION
July 26, 2003
Re "Wyman Gets Her Diamond," July 22: I wonder if [former Councilwoman] Rosalind "Roz" Wyman ever thinks about the people she helped evict from their humble little homes in Chavez Ravine ("Plan May Be Another Strikeout for Fairness," Opinion, July 20). I did not vote for, nor have I ever attended, Dodger Stadium. I don't think the eviction of people from their homes for the benefit of private enterprise would stand today. I might be wrong, though. Big Money and Politics = Anything Big Money Wants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2003 | Kathleen Flynn, Times Staff Writer
In 1953, when Rosalind "Roz" Wyman became the youngest person elected to the City Council, the 22-year-old began her first term by fighting for a major league baseball team for Los Angeles. In 1958, she got her wish, and the former Brooklyn Dodgers came to town. Wyman's crusade, begun 50 years ago, has won her recognition in another baseball league.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Scene: Book party on Monday night at Neiman Marcus for first-time novelist and current bicoastalist (L.A./Washington, D.C.) Marylouise Oates. A former social columnist and reporter for the Los Angeles Times, Oates veers far from the social whirl in "Making Peace" (Warner Books) to write about the '60s anti-war movement. (In a former life, Oates was a press aide to Sen. Eugene McCarthy's 1968 presidential campaign and worked for the Vietnam Moratorium.) Author tranquillity rating: Low.
MAGAZINE
November 4, 1990 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, Huneven is a Times restaurant critic.
ON SUNDAY NIGHTS IN LOS ANGELES IN THE EARLY '60s, THE BEST FOOD AND THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS COMPANY IN TOWN COULD BE FOUND AT THE HOME OF GENE AND ROZ WYMAN. That was especially true if you happened to be a Democrat. Gene Wyman was the Democratic state chairman, a National Committee member and, according to many, the best fund-raiser in America. Roz Wyman was L.A.'s first City Councilwoman, vice president of Screen Gems/Columbia Studios and the woman who brought the Dodgers to town.
NEWS
March 26, 1986 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Barbie is coming. Paris-based designer Billy Boy is arriving May 1 with his two extraordinary Barbie collections--one of 300 Barbie dolls dressed by world-famous designers (Mary McFadden, Bill Blass, Sonia Rykiel, Guy Larouche, you-name-it), the other of 400 of his own dolls representing the history of Barbie, 1959 to au courant.
NEWS
December 9, 1985 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth picked up the Scopus Award from the American Friends of Hebrew University on Thursday night--and managed to coyly keep alive rumors about a possible political move while proving he's a guy who can always take control. The glamorous crowd, estimated at 1,100, paid $1,200 a couple to listen to a lengthy introduction by Howard Cosell on a tri-tiered dais, a few speeches and a Grammy-worthy performance by Johnny Mathis.
NEWS
December 24, 1986 | Marylouise Oates
Dear Santa, For all our favorite names and faces Here, in this most glitz of places, We wish the best of holiday seasons. With little rhyme and lots of reasons. Put these names high on your list And please make sure that none are missed. Cheers first to all the ladies lunching They stay svelte despite their munching We wish them all the best of tables-- And designer clothes with the best of labels.
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