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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1991
I want the R.P.V. City Council to know that there are many citizens who are not happy with the "build more and bigger development" philosophy at City Hall. I am alarmed at the rapid rate of development with its problems of traffic and noise. And why in heaven's name do we need helicopters at the new hotel? While I am busy trying to conserve water, the R.P.V. City Council group of three, Hinchliffe, Hughes and Bacharach, are busy trying to waste water on a hotel, golf courses and multiple new housing tracts.
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NEWS
January 26, 1995 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rancho Palos Verdes has a multimillion-dollar problem in its own back yard: a 1,200-acre landslide that has damaged or destroyed more than 145 homes since 1956. Now, the city is asking its neighbor, the Port of Los Angeles, for help. When the port undertakes massive projects such as building piers, it must donate money or services for environmental projects such as wetlands restoration. Within reason, officials say, the restoration can take place almost anywhere.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1993
Is there a crisis in R.P.V. finances or a crisis in credibility or both? Where are City Council finance goals that justify present tax increases? Where are documented specific line items in the budget? I oppose providing the city with an open checkbook. At the City Council meeting on Aug. 31 Mayor Susan Brooks admitted possibly being naive. Do City Council meetings permit a full spectrum of opinion to be expressed? Do citizens have the right to ask, "Why more taxes?" Can citizens inquire what taxes are to be used for?
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rancho Palos Verdes council members are trying to stop local landslides by any means necessary, even if it means breaking the law. On July 5, the council considered three measures aimed at halting landslides at Portuguese Bend and Abalone Cove, but the council may have moved onto shaky legal ground by voting to leave an undetermined number of square metal baskets filled with rocks, known as gabions, on the shoreline between Inspiration Point and the Portuguese Bend Club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1993
Go for it, Covina! Just recently, the citizens of Covina recalled their entire City Council (by 5,000 votes) because their City Council had put in a 6% utility tax. Vox populi! We in R.P.V. (Rancho Palos Verdes), however, have the good fortune to have voted in City Council members (three of them) at the last election who promised faithfully that they would put any tax increase to a vote of the citizens of R.P.V. Aren't we lucky? Wait. What are these newspaper articles concerning the R.P.V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990
Three areas of this hill were incorporated years ago. Others took the choice commercial parcels, as anyone can see if you look at a map; the rest was county controlled. Residents of the leftover land wanted better control over their destiny, so Rancho Palos Verdes was formed. R.P.V. has little revenue-producing commercial land but has a great asset of about five miles of mostly privately owned vacant coastline. The dilemma was what to do with this jewel? There are those who would like to leave it vacant, but who will pay these landowners their return on their investment?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993
Of late, Rancho Palos Verdes Mayor Susan Brooks has launched a media blitz, apparently designed to convince the local populace that she can leap tall buildings in a single bound, stop racing locomotives with one hand and catch speeding bullets in her teeth. However, when she uses her official position and the local media to attack those who disagree with her and the often-flawed decisions of the R.P.V. City Council . . . then it is time for a truth squad to follow her in her peregrinations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992
There are two questions that each voter should ask before casting a vote in any probable effort by Rancho Palos Verdes officials to raise city taxes: 1. Are we better off now than we were before this area was incorporated as a city? 2. What has the city done for me lately? As a 25-year resident of this area and one who voted for incorporation in 1973, my answer to the first question must be a resounding, "No," and my answer to the second question must be an equally resounding, "Nothing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1992
It is my opinion that more money is not the answer to Rancho Palos Verdes' poor money management (Times, Jan. 2). The residents of Rancho Palos Verdes should not be made to pay the penalty for this. Early last fall, I attended a Saturday council meeting at Hesse Park as an interested citizen and learned of the situation and extended the idea of tapping the expertise of the many retired citizens as volunteers. Volunteers could answer phones and share their many talents a few hours a week in many professional capacities at City Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1989
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council will limit to 43 houses a subdivision being planned by Watt Palos Verdes along Palos Verdes Drive South. The council also set guidelines for the development, which has gone through numerous revisions since it was first proposed two years ago for land overlooking the old Marineland site. The guidelines restrict the size of the houses, limit removal of fill to 250,000 cubic yards, and require the 64-acre subdivision to have privately maintained streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1993
Is there a crisis in R.P.V. finances or a crisis in credibility or both? Where are City Council finance goals that justify present tax increases? Where are documented specific line items in the budget? I oppose providing the city with an open checkbook. At the City Council meeting on Aug. 31 Mayor Susan Brooks admitted possibly being naive. Do City Council meetings permit a full spectrum of opinion to be expressed? Do citizens have the right to ask, "Why more taxes?" Can citizens inquire what taxes are to be used for?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993
Of late, Rancho Palos Verdes Mayor Susan Brooks has launched a media blitz, apparently designed to convince the local populace that she can leap tall buildings in a single bound, stop racing locomotives with one hand and catch speeding bullets in her teeth. However, when she uses her official position and the local media to attack those who disagree with her and the often-flawed decisions of the R.P.V. City Council . . . then it is time for a truth squad to follow her in her peregrinations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1993
Go for it, Covina! Just recently, the citizens of Covina recalled their entire City Council (by 5,000 votes) because their City Council had put in a 6% utility tax. Vox populi! We in R.P.V. (Rancho Palos Verdes), however, have the good fortune to have voted in City Council members (three of them) at the last election who promised faithfully that they would put any tax increase to a vote of the citizens of R.P.V. Aren't we lucky? Wait. What are these newspaper articles concerning the R.P.V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rancho Palos Verdes City Councilman Robert E. Ryan, who helped found the city in 1973 and has served on its council ever since, abruptly resigned Wednesday to accept an appointment to the county's Regional Planning Commission. Ryan's resignation came in the form of a two-page press release in which he reminisced about his two decades in politics and noted that he could not hold elective office while serving on the planning commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1993
Your reportage of the stormy Rancho Palos Verdes City Council meeting when we eliminated the recreation programs was very accurate. One, however, could get the impression that I shouted at the audience when, in fact, I shouted to be heard. (Councilwoman Jacki) Bacharach, who bled profusely over the demise of these programs, is never willing to stand up and take her gigantic share of the blame for the financial mess the city is in. She was ardently defending spending some $200,000 (the real number is this or more because the rec programs have continually undershot their revenue projections)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1993 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Strapped for income and facing a $2-million budget deficit, the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council has resorted to deep cuts in the city's popular parks and recreation programs. Meeting Tuesday, the council voted 4 to 1 to eliminate many programs and cut the recreation department staff in half, eliminating four positions, including the $60,000-a-year parks and recreation director's job. The cuts take effect July 1, the beginning of the 1993-94 budget year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991
About 18 years ago, we moved to Rancho Palos Verdes. We chose this beautiful area because of the environment--air quality, schools, little vehicle traffic, parks, lack of crime and a closeness to the urban centers for work and cultural events. It was a suburbia dream of the best of everything. In the years that followed, we saw the development of Hesse Park, the construction of the Palos Verdes mall containing the May Co. and Bullocks, the three-story parking garage to support the shopping mall, the removal of overhead cables along Hawthorne Boulevard, the demise of Marineland and the construction of a new post office to accommodate a tremendous growth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1990
Where will it end, Jacki? Where will it end, Rancho Palos Verdes? The latest example of "it" occurred on Jan. 16. "It" is the cavalier personal characterization by Councilwoman Jacki Bacharach of anyone whom she finds to hold views, standards, or opinions contrary to her own which somehow shuts off debate and dismisses as irrelevant or trivial any question of the honesty or rationality of such a characterization. If Jacki says it, it must be so and the "victim" is damned. The latest victim is Luella Wike, now former Rancho Palos Verdes planning commissioner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1992 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council moved a step closer to balancing its $7.2-million budget for 1992-93 by creating a special assessment district to raise $868,000 annually. Brushing aside the protests of a small but vocal group of residents at a special meeting Sunday, the council voted 4 to 0 to form a landscaping and lighting district that will impose an assessment of $51 a year on the average single-family dwelling. Of the city's 16,000 property owners, 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992
The Rancho Palos Verdes City Council has put off adopting a budget because of concerns about possible state spending cuts, but members directed city staff to adhere to a proposed $13.8-million spending plan. Council members decided not to adopt the 1992-93 budget Tuesday night because the Legislature, which is still finalizing its own budget, may take funds traditionally earmarked for cities to help bring state spending in line with tax revenues. Rancho Palos Verdes' $13.
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