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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation has awarded more than $127,000 to the Royal Shakespeare Company. The grant is to help the company's outreach arm, which brings the Bard's work to children in underprivileged schools. Other beneficiaries from the foundation's recent round of funding include the Islington Community Theatre, Half Moon Young People's Theatre and the Young Musicians Symphony Orchestra. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times “We are delighted to continue supporting projects and initiatives which provide high-quality tuition in the arts and heritage, and make an impact in communities across the U.K.," said Madeleine Lloyd Webber, trustee for the foundation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation has awarded more than $127,000 to the Royal Shakespeare Company. The grant is to help the company's outreach arm, which brings the Bard's work to children in underprivileged schools. Other beneficiaries from the foundation's recent round of funding include the Islington Community Theatre, Half Moon Young People's Theatre and the Young Musicians Symphony Orchestra. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times “We are delighted to continue supporting projects and initiatives which provide high-quality tuition in the arts and heritage, and make an impact in communities across the U.K.," said Madeleine Lloyd Webber, trustee for the foundation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Last week's financial report on the 1985-86 Broadway season wasn't too encouraging. American resident theater didn't have a blue-ribbon year either, according to Theatre Communications Group. Considered as a whole, the nation's 220-odd nonprofit theaters ended up, indeed, without a profit. Total income was roughly $234.7 million. Total outlay was $239.3 million. Total deficit was $4.6 million. On the other hand, there was good news. Total attendance was up to a five-year high of 14.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - An influential Republican senator involved in drafting a bipartisan immigration bill wants to lower the number of family members of U.S. citizens allowed to immigrate each year and instead increase the number of highly skilled workers. Democrats in the group have not agreed to the approach, but Democratic Senate aides concede that it could be part of the give and take of a deal. The proposal would eliminate the current preference for admitting siblings and adult children of U.S. citizens, but leave in place the preference for spouses and minor children.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By David Ng
One of the most prominent theater companies in England has found itself under fire for its casting of a classic Chinese play. The Royal Shakespeare Co. in Stratford-upon-Avon is being criticized for casting just three actors of Asian descent in the ensemble cast of "The Orphan of Zhao," one of the most famous plays in Chinese history. The RSC's production, directed by Gregory Doran and adapted by James Fenton, features a multicultural cast of 17 performers. Most of the principal characters -- including the title role -- will be played by non-Asian actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
During an interview last week, Daniel Singer of the Reduced Shakespeare Company wouldn't tell just how the three-man troupe goes about compressing the complete works of the Bard of Avon into a 2-hour show. He was steadfast: "The reason people come is to see how we do it. We might not have an audience if they knew beforehand." Well, it doesn't take a Shakespearean scholar to realize that the first step has to be some pretty drastic editing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Ed Sakamoto's "Life of the Land"--seen here in '81 at the East West Players--has found a life in New York, at the Pan Asian Repertory Theatre. It's a sequel to Sakamoto's "Manoa Valley," in which a young man leaves Hawaii for the mainland to seek his fortune. Here he returns after 20 years, not exactly burned out, but ready to settle in with his family. D. J. Bruckner of the New York Times was impressed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Royal Shakespeare Company actors will be going back to school for master classes in performance with the University of Warwick as a part of a new theater study center. The Higher Education Funding Council for England awarded $8.5 million to enable the world-famous theater to join the university to create a learning center for students, the teaching staff and the professional actors, it was announced Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That funky, doo-wop musical "The Little Shop of Horrors" is back again with its man-eating plant from outer space and its Skid Row florists, Audrey and Seymour, a pair of terminally love-starved misfits destined for comic disaster. This time the show comes to us courtesy of the theater arts department of Rancho Santiago College, which used to run something called the Professional Actors' Conservatory but which no longer does due to budget cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Adrian Noble got roughed up a bit toward the end of his tenure as the Bard's man in Britain -- he left in 2003 after 13 years as artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, his plans for tearing down its main stage in Stratford-upon-Avon and building a more contemporary facility having drawn slings and arrows from the media and the arts community. Noble, 58, is eager to have another go at leading a company of Shakespearean actors, this time at San Diego's Old Globe. Noble has been named artistic director of next year's annual Shakespeare Festival, consisting of three summer productions at the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre in Balboa Park, the theater announced Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2012 | By David Ng
One of the most prominent theater companies in England has found itself under fire for its casting of a classic Chinese play. The Royal Shakespeare Co. in Stratford-upon-Avon is being criticized for casting just three actors of Asian descent in the ensemble cast of "The Orphan of Zhao," one of the most famous plays in Chinese history. The RSC's production, directed by Gregory Doran and adapted by James Fenton, features a multicultural cast of 17 performers. Most of the principal characters -- including the title role -- will be played by non-Asian actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010
SERIES Smallville: Chloe (Allison Mack) is approached by a stranger seeking help of the superhero variety on a double episode of the young Superman drama (8 p.m. KTLA). Medium: Diedrich Bader ("The Drew Carey Show") guest-stars as the mystery man in Allison's (Patricia Arquette) visions in the new episode of the supernatural drama (9 p.m. CBS). Bill Moyers Journal: The journalist and his guests discuss the Supreme Court's recent decision to allow corporations to spend large sums on elections (9 p.m. KCET)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Adrian Noble got roughed up a bit toward the end of his tenure as the Bard's man in Britain -- he left in 2003 after 13 years as artistic director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, his plans for tearing down its main stage in Stratford-upon-Avon and building a more contemporary facility having drawn slings and arrows from the media and the arts community. Noble, 58, is eager to have another go at leading a company of Shakespearean actors, this time at San Diego's Old Globe. Noble has been named artistic director of next year's annual Shakespeare Festival, consisting of three summer productions at the Lowell Davies Festival Theatre in Balboa Park, the theater announced Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Royal Shakespeare Company actors will be going back to school for master classes in performance with the University of Warwick as a part of a new theater study center. The Higher Education Funding Council for England awarded $8.5 million to enable the world-famous theater to join the university to create a learning center for students, the teaching staff and the professional actors, it was announced Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1994 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That funky, doo-wop musical "The Little Shop of Horrors" is back again with its man-eating plant from outer space and its Skid Row florists, Audrey and Seymour, a pair of terminally love-starved misfits destined for comic disaster. This time the show comes to us courtesy of the theater arts department of Rancho Santiago College, which used to run something called the Professional Actors' Conservatory but which no longer does due to budget cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
During an interview last week, Daniel Singer of the Reduced Shakespeare Company wouldn't tell just how the three-man troupe goes about compressing the complete works of the Bard of Avon into a 2-hour show. He was steadfast: "The reason people come is to see how we do it. We might not have an audience if they knew beforehand." Well, it doesn't take a Shakespearean scholar to realize that the first step has to be some pretty drastic editing.
NATIONAL
March 15, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - An influential Republican senator involved in drafting a bipartisan immigration bill wants to lower the number of family members of U.S. citizens allowed to immigrate each year and instead increase the number of highly skilled workers. Democrats in the group have not agreed to the approach, but Democratic Senate aides concede that it could be part of the give and take of a deal. The proposal would eliminate the current preference for admitting siblings and adult children of U.S. citizens, but leave in place the preference for spouses and minor children.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2010
SERIES Smallville: Chloe (Allison Mack) is approached by a stranger seeking help of the superhero variety on a double episode of the young Superman drama (8 p.m. KTLA). Medium: Diedrich Bader ("The Drew Carey Show") guest-stars as the mystery man in Allison's (Patricia Arquette) visions in the new episode of the supernatural drama (9 p.m. CBS). Bill Moyers Journal: The journalist and his guests discuss the Supreme Court's recent decision to allow corporations to spend large sums on elections (9 p.m. KCET)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Ed Sakamoto's "Life of the Land"--seen here in '81 at the East West Players--has found a life in New York, at the Pan Asian Repertory Theatre. It's a sequel to Sakamoto's "Manoa Valley," in which a young man leaves Hawaii for the mainland to seek his fortune. Here he returns after 20 years, not exactly burned out, but ready to settle in with his family. D. J. Bruckner of the New York Times was impressed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Last week's financial report on the 1985-86 Broadway season wasn't too encouraging. American resident theater didn't have a blue-ribbon year either, according to Theatre Communications Group. Considered as a whole, the nation's 220-odd nonprofit theaters ended up, indeed, without a profit. Total income was roughly $234.7 million. Total outlay was $239.3 million. Total deficit was $4.6 million. On the other hand, there was good news. Total attendance was up to a five-year high of 14.
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