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OPINION
February 12, 2014
Re "Subway to remove bread ingredient," Feb. 7 It is appalling what the Food and Drug Administration calls safe. To my surprise I find that the FDA-approved chemical azodicarbonamide, considered to be "safely used" in food, is used in some Subway bread and is also commonly found in rubber shoe soles and yoga mats. Tasty. I understand that Subway promotes a healthy lifestyle, but this is one thing my exercise and eating habits should not have in common. The American food industry possibly is not only sickening people with chemical enhancements such as azodicarbonamide, which has been linked to asthma and respiratory problems, it is also starving us of nutrients by providing foods that temporarily satisfy but are so processed and artificial that there is little to no nutritional value left in them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Using some plain old rubber strips, scientists have created a whole new shape -- a hemihelix, a long spiral that switches twisting directions over its length. The shape, described in the journal PLOS One, is rarely seen in nature - and could potentially prove useful for manipulating light on tiny scales. In a standard helix the spiral coils up and up in the same direction, like a stretched-out slinky, and it's a fairly common shape in the natural world, most notably in the double helix of DNA. But hemihelices?
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SCIENCE
May 31, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Hundreds and perhaps even thousands of years before Charles Goodyear discovered the vulcanization process that made commercial rubber viable, Mesoamerican peoples were carrying out a similar process to produce rubber artifacts for a broad variety of uses, two MIT researchers have found. By varying the amount of materials they added to raw rubber, Mesoamericans were able to produce bouncy rubber balls for the Mayas' ceremonial games, resilient rubber sandals and sticky material used to glue implements to handles, the research shows.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Could a little move make a big difference for pitcher Joe Blanton, who confounded the Angels and their fans by going 2-14 with a 6.04 earned run average and allowing 29 home runs last season? Manager Mike Scioscia hopes so. Blanton moved from the first-base side of the rubber to the third-base side Wednesday and threw five scoreless innings against the Texas Rangers, allowing one hit, striking out five and walking none. He gave up seven runs and eight hits in his previous start against Colorado.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Using some plain old rubber strips, scientists have created a whole new shape -- a hemihelix, a long spiral that switches twisting directions over its length. The shape, described in the journal PLOS One, is rarely seen in nature - and could potentially prove useful for manipulating light on tiny scales. In a standard helix the spiral coils up and up in the same direction, like a stretched-out slinky, and it's a fairly common shape in the natural world, most notably in the double helix of DNA. But hemihelices?
AUTOS
August 17, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
The only thing better than looking at some of the fastest and most beautiful classic cars is seeing -- and hearing -- them in action. That's what drew hundreds of racers and thousands of spectators to Saturday's Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in Salinas, Calif. Highway 1 profiled one such vintage-car racer recently: Lynn Park, who has a dozen Shelby Cobras . Check out this quick video of some behind-the-scenes action from Saturday's races.
SPORTS
March 13, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Could a little move make a big difference for pitcher Joe Blanton, who confounded the Angels and their fans by going 2-14 with a 6.04 earned run average and allowing 29 home runs last season? Manager Mike Scioscia hopes so. Blanton moved from the first-base side of the rubber to the third-base side Wednesday and threw five scoreless innings against the Texas Rangers, allowing one hit, striking out five and walking none. He gave up seven runs and eight hits in his previous start against Colorado.
MAGAZINE
March 12, 2000
If any woman tells a friend or relative that her rubber beach thongs have gone glamorous ("Hip Flops," Feb. 6), at a cost of $350 for the pair from Libbie Lane in Beverly Hills, or $429 for the pair from Madison, or $830 for the pair from Dolce & Gabbana, I hope the listener will have the bravery and decency to call her stupid. Thomas J. Sinsky El Segundo
SPORTS
April 19, 2004 | Mike DiGiovanna, Times Staff Writer
As baseball rivalries go, the Angels and Oakland Athletics probably will never match the Dodgers and San Francisco Giants for sheer intensity on the field and loathing among fans off it. But Angel Manager Mike Scio- scia may have unwittingly spiced things up a bit when he got into an animated discussion with Oakland Manager Ken Macha and umpire Tim Welke while exchanging lineup cards before Saturday night's game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Allergic reactions to the natural rubber in condoms and protective gloves raise health concerns and could prevent some people from following the rules of safe sex, a dermatologist said last week. In one documented case, a woman developed hives and suffered respiratory problems within minutes after engaging in intercourse using a latex-based condom, said Dr. James Taylor of the Cleveland Clinic, author of an article published in this month's Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
OPINION
February 12, 2014
Re "Subway to remove bread ingredient," Feb. 7 It is appalling what the Food and Drug Administration calls safe. To my surprise I find that the FDA-approved chemical azodicarbonamide, considered to be "safely used" in food, is used in some Subway bread and is also commonly found in rubber shoe soles and yoga mats. Tasty. I understand that Subway promotes a healthy lifestyle, but this is one thing my exercise and eating habits should not have in common. The American food industry possibly is not only sickening people with chemical enhancements such as azodicarbonamide, which has been linked to asthma and respiratory problems, it is also starving us of nutrients by providing foods that temporarily satisfy but are so processed and artificial that there is little to no nutritional value left in them.
HEALTH
October 26, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
If you have knee pain, we've got a remedy for you. Called the kneady ball, this therapy ball (or tennis ball) massage developed by Jill Miller for the Rx Series class at Equinox gyms eases stiffness and soreness, allowing you to move like your old self again. What it does The rubber therapy ball digs into the suprapatellar pouch, massaging the area where the quadriceps muscles converge, loosening tightness and allowing the knee to track more smoothly. What to do Come down to the floor on hands and knees with a ball and a yoga block.
AUTOS
August 17, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
The only thing better than looking at some of the fastest and most beautiful classic cars is seeing -- and hearing -- them in action. That's what drew hundreds of racers and thousands of spectators to Saturday's Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in Salinas, Calif. Highway 1 profiled one such vintage-car racer recently: Lynn Park, who has a dozen Shelby Cobras . Check out this quick video of some behind-the-scenes action from Saturday's races.
SPORTS
August 3, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Is it the curse of Kevin Kolb? Maybe it's the curse of the Buffalo Bills, who can't seem to find a quality starting quarterback. Let the debate begin after Kolb injured his left knee when he slipped on a wet rubber mat while running between practice fields at the Bills' training camp in Pittsford, N.Y., on Saturday. Buffalo Coach Doug Marrone told the media that the injury is not serious and he expects Kolb to return to practice during this coming week. The Bills listed the veteran quarterback as day to day. Kolb reportedly stumbled on the mat when running from one field to another with other offensive players.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - When the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court began in 1978, it was seen as a smart compromise aimed at protecting both national security and civil liberties. Before, the FBI under Director J. Edgar Hoover or the U.S. attorney general could use secret wiretaps to compile damaging dossiers on perceived enemies, including politicians and activists. Under the new law, the FBI or the CIA had to go before a judge of the special court if it wanted to wiretap an "agent of a foreign power" in this country, such as a Soviet spy. These days, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court is more often seen as a good idea gone sour.
WORLD
June 15, 2013 | By Glen Johnson and Jeffrey Fleishman
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Hundreds of riot police firing tear gas stormed a central Istanbul park Saturday, tearing down tents and clearing out demonstrators in a bold, if politically risky, move by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to stem more than two weeks of antigovernment protests. The police assault at twilight sent hundreds of protesters scurrying for cover as street clashes echoed through the city. The swift and overwhelming action by security forces highlighted the country's deepening political divide and the potential danger Erdogan faces in further provoking a large segment of Turks critical of what they see as his authoritarian tendencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Responding to complaints that bumpy railroad crossings are damaging cars and injuring cyclists in the San Fernando Valley, City Councilman Hal Bernson on Wednesday asked city officials to study the purchase of rubber material to make all crossings safer in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It would have once likely been called a "head" movie, something purposely strange, more than a little puzzling and perhaps more readily appreciated in some altered state of consciousness. Let's face it: "Rubber," written and directed by Frenchman Quentin Dupieux, better known to some as the electronic musician Mr. Oizo, is weird. Delightfully so. Available on multiple video-on-demand platforms and opening in Los Angeles on April 1, "Rubber" is the story of a rubber tire that inexplicably gains consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
A popular art installation in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbor is no longer making waves. A 54-foot rubber duck, designed by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman, started deflating Tuesday, and by Wednesday, the piece looked like a flattened yellow pancake bobbing on the water. “Rubber Duck” was installed May 2 and has since spawned serenades from city officials, choreographed dances by local groups and brisk sales of du ck-related goods. Officials were slow to report that the piece was deflated as part of a planned tuneup, leaving onlookers to wonder if the bird had been a victim of “fowl” play.
SPORTS
April 30, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
OAKLAND - Mike Scioscia passed Jerome Williams in the Angels clubhouse Tuesday afternoon and asked how the right-hander was feeling after throwing six innings and 74 pitches, giving up four hits and one unearned run, in Monday night's 10-8, 19-inning loss to the Oakland Athletics. “I'm good,” Williams told the Angels manager. “I can give you two innings tonight.” Scioscia laughed, knowing full well that Williams would be down Tuesday after absorbing so many innings Monday.
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