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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
The Santa Paula City Council granted a commercial refuse collection permit to a Ventura rubbish hauler Monday after learning that a moratorium on new permits expired nearly two years ago. An official for Rubbish Control Inc. had asked the city to repeal the moratorium two months ago at a council hearing on a proposed new trash ordinance. Later, city staff determined that the moratorium, issued in April, 1990, had expired one year later and not been renewed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
The Santa Paula City Council granted a commercial refuse collection permit to a Ventura rubbish hauler Monday after learning that a moratorium on new permits expired nearly two years ago. An official for Rubbish Control Inc. had asked the city to repeal the moratorium two months ago at a council hearing on a proposed new trash ordinance. Later, city staff determined that the moratorium, issued in April, 1990, had expired one year later and not been renewed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE
A Ventura City Council committee will recommend Monday that the city enter into negotiations with longtime city trash hauler E. J. Harrison & Sons Inc. for a long-term contract to handle Ventura's trash and recycling. The current contract between the city and the company is worth $9.1 million annually, which is the largest contract Ventura awards, said Steve Chase, the city's environmental coordinator. The committee plans to recommend that an agreement for five to 10 years be negotiated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992 | CAITLIN ROTHER
The Camarillo City Council has decided to set up a new system for commercial waste hauling in the city, allowing one company to have a monopoly on collecting business owners' trash. In a 3-1 vote, the council voted after 2 1/2 hours of debate to amend the city code, which calls for non-exclusive franchise agreements. Councilman Ken Gose was the sole dissenter. Councilman David M. Smith was absent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1990 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A garbage war has begun to heat up in the city of Ventura. On one side of the scrap is E.J. Harrison & Sons, a family that has monopolized the business of collecting the city's trash for the past five years. But seeking to unseat the Harrisons at the top of the garbage heap in the city is another Ventura trash collection company, Rubbish Control Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1990 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura's recycling center will greatly expand operations today, two days after the Ventura City Council approved agreements with a recycling company and the city's two rubbish haulers. The city-sponsored Gold Coast Recycling Center has been receiving between 20 and 25 tons per day from single-family residences since mid-June. Today, the center will begin receiving an estimated 100 tons a day from businesses, recycling coordinator Eric Werbalowsky said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1999 | TINA DIRMANN and HOLLY J. WOLCOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The company that owns the truck involved in a fatal collision on California 126 has flunked state safety inspections twice in the past four years--and once had a truck taken out of service because of faulty brakes, state investigators said Friday. The driver of the truck involved in Thursday's double-fatality accident said his brakes failed before the crash. Rubbish Control Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990 | JACK SEARLES and SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years ago, rubbish was hardly a conversation piece in Ventura County. It was something you lugged to the curb and dismissed from your mind. Collection rates were relatively cheap. They varied little from city to city and they didn't go up, no matter how many barrels or bags were put out. All of that, trash experts predict, is about to change. A new state law will, in the decade ahead, require deep reductions in cities' landfill usage.
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