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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
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NEWS
December 25, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hang on, trash fans, the nation's most spectacular garbage dump is being planned for this sandy, rocky, remote spot in the eastern Imperial Valley. The dimensions are daunting: a garbage pile 450 feet tall, three miles long, and up to 1 1/2 miles wide. By some reckonings it would be the most expansive man-made object in the world, covering nearly 3,000 acres, or, if you prefer, more than 6,800 football fields--including the end zones.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1988
Despite widespread opposition, trash-to-energy plants are necessary to solve Los Angeles County's garbage crisis, Sherman Roodzant, chairman of the state Waste Management Board, told a waste disposal conference in Monrovia on Thursday. Although recycling is popular, it can solve only part of the problem, Roodzant said.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1987 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Directors of the county Sanitation Districts voted Monday to drop plans to build a controversial $165-million waste-to-energy plant at the Spadra landfill in Pomona. James F. Stahl, assistant general manager, told directors that although the project is "technically and environmentally sound," it has lost the support of the cities it was designed to serve.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
After a six-hour train trip that began at Pasadena's Amtrak station and ended on the Mojave Desert more than 200 miles away, Tom Harvey, a councilman from the San Gabriel Valley city of La Verne, gazed across the horizon and was delighted to find an unbroken stretch of empty space. No houses. No businesses. No people. "Just an incredible expanse of nothing," he enthused. "Dead flat desert."
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hang on, trash fans, the nation's most spectacular garbage dump is being planned for this sandy, rocky, remote spot in the eastern Imperial Valley. The dimensions are daunting: a garbage pile 450 feet tall, three miles long, and up to 1 1/2 miles wide. By some reckonings it would be the most expansive man-made object in the world, covering nearly 3,000 acres, or, if you prefer, more than 6,800 football fields--including the end zones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1995 | JEFF BEAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County administrators hope to import garbage from neighboring counties to raise cash for a bankruptcy recovery plan, but the proposal must first survive something tougher than angry residents: a highly competitive market. "Certainly Orange County landfills would be closer, so there would be lower transportation costs," said Gaye Soroka, director of government affairs for Waste Management of North County in Oceanside. "But the question is, would the dumping fee be competitive?"
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
After a six-hour train trip that began at Pasadena's Amtrak station and ended on the Mojave Desert more than 200 miles away, Tom Harvey, a councilman from the San Gabriel Valley city of La Verne, gazed across the horizon and was delighted to find an unbroken stretch of empty space. No houses. No businesses. No people. "Just an incredible expanse of nothing," he enthused. "Dead flat desert."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1988
Despite widespread opposition, trash-to-energy plants are necessary to solve Los Angeles County's garbage crisis, Sherman Roodzant, chairman of the state Waste Management Board, told a waste disposal conference in Monrovia on Thursday. Although recycling is popular, it can solve only part of the problem, Roodzant said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1987 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Directors of the county Sanitation Districts voted Monday to drop plans to build a controversial $165-million waste-to-energy plant at the Spadra landfill in Pomona. James F. Stahl, assistant general manager, told directors that although the project is "technically and environmentally sound," it has lost the support of the cities it was designed to serve.
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