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NEWS
July 18, 1992 | Associated Press
Nearly a month after 2,200 tons of New York City garbage left for a Midwest dump, the oft-rejected load returned Friday, having chugged about 3,000 miles to reach a resting place 20 miles from home. The garbage, which originated in the South Bronx, arrived in Kearny, N. J., on 30 flatbed rail cars and was to be taken by truck to Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island. The 26-day trip included stops in Illinois, Kansas and Missouri. Each time the train was turned away.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2001 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The planned closure of Brea's landfill in 2013 has left officials scrambling for somewhere else to dump North County trash. Alternatives could mean trucking it out of the county, hauling it by train to the desert or piling it on at landfills in Irvine and San Juan Capistrano. Whatever the choice, it won't be cheap, officials say. Trash. Most people roll it out to the curb each week, never giving a thought to where it goes from there.
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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN
A company that proposed hauling quake debris by rail from the vacant General Motors plant in Panorama City has given up on the project because of delays in obtaining city permits, a representative of the company said Monday. ECDC Environmental, a Utah-based waste-disposal firm, had planned to begin hauling quake rubble to its 3,000-acre landfill in East Carbon City, Utah, by July, said Kent Loest, the firm's vice president for field operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1994 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than three months after the Northridge earthquake, many streets in the San Fernando Valley still look like scenes from the town of Bedrock--with piles of concrete rubble heaped at curbs waiting for city crews to haul them away. Cleaning up after January's 6.8 temblor has proven far more difficult, and vastly more expensive, than anyone figured in the days immediately following the quake.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to ship 25% of Southern California's trash by train to a new desert landfill in Riverside County could have a significant impact on air quality at nearby Joshua Tree National Monument, according to a draft environmental impact statement released Monday. "Increases of nitrogen oxides . . . may worsen ozone concentrations within Joshua Tree," states the report, citing concerns of the National Park Service. " . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN
A company that proposed hauling quake debris by rail from the vacant General Motors plant in Panorama City has given up on the project because of delays in obtaining city permits, a representative of the company said Monday. ECDC Environmental, a Utah-based waste-disposal firm, had planned to begin hauling quake rubble to its 3,000-acre landfill in East Carbon City, Utah, by July, said Kent Loest, the firm's vice president for field operations.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials may soon begin inviting a limited number of Los Angeles haulers to dump about 2,500 tons of garbage each day in county landfills. If adopted, the proposal would end a decades-old ban on outside trash in local landfills. The idea, outlined in a memo by the head of the finance committee of Orange County's Integrated Waste Management Commission, comes in response to the potential annual loss of $12 million in dumping fees at the Olinda landfill near Brea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials are considering a proposal to end a decades-old ban on Los Angeles trash in local landfills, and may invite a limited number of Los Angeles haulers to bring in 2,500 tons of garbage each day. The move, outlined in a memo by the head of the finance committee of Orange County's Integrated Waste Management Commission, comes in response to the potential loss of $12 million in annual dumping fees at the Olinda landfill near Brea.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved legislation Thursday giving state governors the right to limit the amount of garbage that other states can export to their landfills. After four days of negotiations that finally overcame the threat of a filibuster, lawmakers voted, 89 to 2, to pass the bill to allow states to ban new contracts for import of trash and to reduce waste being transported across state lines under existing agreements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1994 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than three months after the Northridge earthquake, many streets in the San Fernando Valley still look like scenes from the town of Bedrock--with piles of concrete rubble heaped at curbs waiting for city crews to haul them away. Cleaning up after January's 6.8 temblor has proven far more difficult, and vastly more expensive, than anyone figured in the days immediately following the quake.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved legislation Thursday giving state governors the right to limit the amount of garbage that other states can export to their landfills. After four days of negotiations that finally overcame the threat of a filibuster, lawmakers voted, 89 to 2, to pass the bill to allow states to ban new contracts for import of trash and to reduce waste being transported across state lines under existing agreements.
NEWS
July 18, 1992 | Associated Press
Nearly a month after 2,200 tons of New York City garbage left for a Midwest dump, the oft-rejected load returned Friday, having chugged about 3,000 miles to reach a resting place 20 miles from home. The garbage, which originated in the South Bronx, arrived in Kearny, N. J., on 30 flatbed rail cars and was to be taken by truck to Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island. The 26-day trip included stops in Illinois, Kansas and Missouri. Each time the train was turned away.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To many urban Southern California residents, the Eagle Mountain waste-by-rail plan makes sense: Reduce the need for local landfills by shipping 25% of the region's trash on trains and trucks to an abandoned open pit almost 200 miles east of Los Angeles. But to many desert farmers and affluent Palm Springs-area residents, it is a proposal from hell.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials may soon begin inviting a limited number of Los Angeles haulers to dump about 2,500 tons of garbage each day in county landfills. If adopted, the proposal would end a decades-old ban on outside trash in local landfills. The idea, outlined in a memo by the head of the finance committee of Orange County's Integrated Waste Management Commission, comes in response to the potential annual loss of $12 million in dumping fees at the Olinda landfill near Brea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials are considering a proposal to end a decades-old ban on Los Angeles trash in local landfills, and may invite a limited number of Los Angeles haulers to bring in 2,500 tons of garbage each day. The move, outlined in a memo by the head of the finance committee of Orange County's Integrated Waste Management Commission, comes in response to the potential loss of $12 million in annual dumping fees at the Olinda landfill near Brea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2001 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The planned closure of Brea's landfill in 2013 has left officials scrambling for somewhere else to dump North County trash. Alternatives could mean trucking it out of the county, hauling it by train to the desert or piling it on at landfills in Irvine and San Juan Capistrano. Whatever the choice, it won't be cheap, officials say. Trash. Most people roll it out to the curb each week, never giving a thought to where it goes from there.
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
After a six-hour train trip that began at Pasadena's Amtrak station and ended on the Mojave Desert more than 200 miles away, Tom Harvey, a councilman from the San Gabriel Valley city of La Verne, gazed across the horizon and was delighted to find an unbroken stretch of empty space. No houses. No businesses. No people. "Just an incredible expanse of nothing," he enthused. "Dead flat desert."
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to ship 25% of Southern California's trash by train to a new desert landfill in Riverside County could have a significant impact on air quality at nearby Joshua Tree National Monument, according to a draft environmental impact statement released Monday. "Increases of nitrogen oxides . . . may worsen ozone concentrations within Joshua Tree," states the report, citing concerns of the National Park Service. " . . .
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
After a six-hour train trip that began at Pasadena's Amtrak station and ended on the Mojave Desert more than 200 miles away, Tom Harvey, a councilman from the San Gabriel Valley city of La Verne, gazed across the horizon and was delighted to find an unbroken stretch of empty space. No houses. No businesses. No people. "Just an incredible expanse of nothing," he enthused. "Dead flat desert."
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