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OPINION
May 5, 2008
Re "See the world, let special interests pay, governor urges," May 1 Why do brain-dead city-dwellers like Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger think that, just because you live in a small town, you are some sort of red-necked rube? Lots of Californians and Americans choose to live in rural America to live freer, less hectic and more peaceful lives. As a resident of an urban part of Los Angeles County, I envy people who have the wits, intelligence and common sense to live in small-town California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
I left "The Art of Rube Goldberg" on the kitchen table one morning to see if my 8-year-old would take the bait. It wasn't long before she was pulling the book closer to study the cartoonist's cockeyed, unnecessarily elaborate contraptions. Then she drew some of her own. Goldberg's inventive designs are perfect spark plugs for the imagination. They turn mundane activities like squeezing orange juice or mailing a letter into long, silly chains of improbable cause and effect. In Goldberg's universe, the simple act of swatting a fly might require a bottle of carbolic acid, a bean shooter, a tub of syrup, a live trout and a baseball bat, among other things.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1988 | ANDREA ESTEPA, Times Staff Writer
Rube the hippopotamus, one of the oldest and most popular animals at the San Diego Zoo, was put to sleep Wednesday. Rube was 51 years old and believed to be the oldest living hippopotamus in captivity. "We try not to get too attached to them, but you can't help it," said Rube's keeper, George Muro. "You feel like crying. We gave him the best care we could, all of us. He was one of our favorites."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By David Pagel
The lost art of doodling, along with the disappearing art of architectural draftsmanship, lies behind “Loaded: Drawings by Mary O'Malley and Laura Sharp Wilson.” At Sam Lee Gallery, this felicitous pairing of works on paper makes room for calm possibility. O'Malley's three abstractions anchor the exhibition. Larger than any of Sharp Wilson's page-size pieces, O'Malley's ink, gouache and gold leaf drawings resemble stylized chandeliers that defy gravity, sometimes hovering like imaginary spacecraft or letting us get lost in their ornate ornamentation.
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Showtime describes its new weekly series "Dead Like Me," which premieres Friday, as a show about "life after life." It's not, however, set in heaven or hell. The premise revolves around Georgia "George" Lass (Ellen Muth), a member of the young generation's disaffected who doesn't know what she wants from life. George is sullen, angry and aimless, and she hates her mother. Then one day, a toilet seat that has fallen from a malfunctioning MIR space station hurtles to Earth and fatally strikes her.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012 | By David Pagel
The lost art of doodling, along with the disappearing art of architectural draftsmanship, lies behind “Loaded: Drawings by Mary O'Malley and Laura Sharp Wilson.” At Sam Lee Gallery, this felicitous pairing of works on paper makes room for calm possibility. O'Malley's three abstractions anchor the exhibition. Larger than any of Sharp Wilson's page-size pieces, O'Malley's ink, gouache and gold leaf drawings resemble stylized chandeliers that defy gravity, sometimes hovering like imaginary spacecraft or letting us get lost in their ornate ornamentation.
NEWS
July 25, 2004 | John Crook, Special to The Times
George Lass (Ellen Muth) steps more confidently into the first day of the rest of her death as "Dead Like Me" begins its second season Sunday on Showtime. Fans of the dark comedy will remember that George (short for Georgia) spent much of season one in a vile mood, and understandably so. After all, the bright but aimless teenager had been fatally creamed by a toilet seat from the plummeting Skylab space station.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The call came on the eve of his Los Angeles concert, just as he was leaving his home in Mexico. We have your son. Follow our instructions. Don't make trouble. It was a year ago, and Vicente Fernandez was about to headline four sold-out shows at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, his annual Memorial Day pilgrimage to the Eastside suburbs of L.A. Now this voice, saying his 33-year-old son, his namesake, was being held for a ransom of millions.
SPORTS
January 2, 1994 | JIM MURRAY
Listen! Do you ever like to see a hustler get hustled? Like to see some guy climb off a load of pumpkins and pick the shell with the pea under it that the dealer thought wasn't there? You would have liked Saturday's 80th Rose Bowl game. You get the sense that was the story of the New Year's game? The Wisconsin Badgers came out here and got a reception as the kind of guys you sell the Brooklyn Bridge or Florida swampland to. You know, guys you lure in the pool hall and say, "You wanta break, kid?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
I left "The Art of Rube Goldberg" on the kitchen table one morning to see if my 8-year-old would take the bait. It wasn't long before she was pulling the book closer to study the cartoonist's cockeyed, unnecessarily elaborate contraptions. Then she drew some of her own. Goldberg's inventive designs are perfect spark plugs for the imagination. They turn mundane activities like squeezing orange juice or mailing a letter into long, silly chains of improbable cause and effect. In Goldberg's universe, the simple act of swatting a fly might require a bottle of carbolic acid, a bean shooter, a tub of syrup, a live trout and a baseball bat, among other things.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2011 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star" is another dispiriting batch of comedy runoff from Adam Sandler's busy second- and third-banana factory at his Happy Madison shingle. This time the sputtering spotlight gets thrown on chipmunk-cheeked comedian Nick Swardson, last seen doing his signature naughty-cherub thing for Sandler in the romantic comedy "Just Go With It. " Here he's a weirdo rube from Iowa with a bowl cut, buckteeth and a dream of becoming a porn star in Hollywood. For Swardson and co-writers Sandler and Allen Covert, the scenario makes for an inept, lazy R-rated movie whose sole purpose is as a glossary of euphemisms for genitalia and sexual acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2008 | Robert Roper, Roper is the author of "Now the Drum of War: Walt Whitman and his Brothers in the Civil War."
This engaging new book about Andrew Jackson, our first up-from-nowhere president, takes its place on a crowded shelf in the library of national leadership. Jackson has not been overlooked heretofore. Just in the last few years there have been useful new works on Jackson and the age of Jackson from Sean Wilentz and Daniel Walker Howe; and scholars such as Andrew Burstein, whose "The Passions of Andrew Jackson" appeared in 2003, continue to air provocative theories.
OPINION
May 5, 2008
Re "See the world, let special interests pay, governor urges," May 1 Why do brain-dead city-dwellers like Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger think that, just because you live in a small town, you are some sort of red-necked rube? Lots of Californians and Americans choose to live in rural America to live freer, less hectic and more peaceful lives. As a resident of an urban part of Los Angeles County, I envy people who have the wits, intelligence and common sense to live in small-town California.
MAGAZINE
April 23, 2006 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a senior writer for West.
She was standing by the fax machine, though she didn't seem to be sending a fax, didn't even seem to notice the machine. She appeared lost, unsure where she was, maybe unable to believe where she was. A Kinko's in Studio City? How in the--?! She didn't notice me either. Like the fax machine, I was part of the furniture. It took more effort not to notice me, though, because I was flat-out gawking. How could I not?
OPINION
April 28, 2005 | Matt Welch, Matt Welch is an associate editor of Reason magazine.
Remember when Hollywood liberals claimed to care about the world's poor? Man, those were the days. Now the richest people in Southern California, who sit on top of a booming $35-billion industry, are using their impressive political clout to punish the struggling citizens of South Africa, Mexico and Romania for having the nerve to think that their tiny domestic film industries could so much as bite Hollywood's ankles.
NEWS
July 25, 2004 | John Crook, Special to The Times
George Lass (Ellen Muth) steps more confidently into the first day of the rest of her death as "Dead Like Me" begins its second season Sunday on Showtime. Fans of the dark comedy will remember that George (short for Georgia) spent much of season one in a vile mood, and understandably so. After all, the bright but aimless teenager had been fatally creamed by a toilet seat from the plummeting Skylab space station.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
In the annals of romance, Magno Rubio's match with Clarabelle is certainly one of the least auspicious. He's a Filipino migrant farm worker in '30s California, only 4 feet 6 inches tall. She's a strawberry blond Arkansas woman whose photo in a lonely hearts magazine has caught his attention. Long before they actually meet, the mismatch is clear -- to everyone except Magno. In her letters, Clarabelle keeps dunning Magno for handouts for her supposedly needy relatives.
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jim Varney, the comedic actor who achieved a loyal following by playing country rube Ernest P. Worrell in commercials, television shows and movies, died Thursday of lung cancer at his home in White House, Tenn. He was 50. Dressed in his trademark baseball cap, T-shirt, blue denim vest and jeans, the rubber-faced, nasal-twanged Varney offered an appearance of haplessness and harmlessness. "It's a lovely outfit that can be worn gracefully six days a week," he once said of his choice of attire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
In the annals of romance, Magno Rubio's match with Clarabelle is certainly one of the least auspicious. He's a Filipino migrant farm worker in '30s California, only 4 feet 6 inches tall. She's a strawberry blond Arkansas woman whose photo in a lonely hearts magazine has caught his attention. Long before they actually meet, the mismatch is clear -- to everyone except Magno. In her letters, Clarabelle keeps dunning Magno for handouts for her supposedly needy relatives.
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Showtime describes its new weekly series "Dead Like Me," which premieres Friday, as a show about "life after life." It's not, however, set in heaven or hell. The premise revolves around Georgia "George" Lass (Ellen Muth), a member of the young generation's disaffected who doesn't know what she wants from life. George is sullen, angry and aimless, and she hates her mother. Then one day, a toilet seat that has fallen from a malfunctioning MIR space station hurtles to Earth and fatally strikes her.
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