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Rube Goldberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
I left "The Art of Rube Goldberg" on the kitchen table one morning to see if my 8-year-old would take the bait. It wasn't long before she was pulling the book closer to study the cartoonist's cockeyed, unnecessarily elaborate contraptions. Then she drew some of her own. Goldberg's inventive designs are perfect spark plugs for the imagination. They turn mundane activities like squeezing orange juice or mailing a letter into long, silly chains of improbable cause and effect. In Goldberg's universe, the simple act of swatting a fly might require a bottle of carbolic acid, a bean shooter, a tub of syrup, a live trout and a baseball bat, among other things.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
I left "The Art of Rube Goldberg" on the kitchen table one morning to see if my 8-year-old would take the bait. It wasn't long before she was pulling the book closer to study the cartoonist's cockeyed, unnecessarily elaborate contraptions. Then she drew some of her own. Goldberg's inventive designs are perfect spark plugs for the imagination. They turn mundane activities like squeezing orange juice or mailing a letter into long, silly chains of improbable cause and effect. In Goldberg's universe, the simple act of swatting a fly might require a bottle of carbolic acid, a bean shooter, a tub of syrup, a live trout and a baseball bat, among other things.
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NEWS
February 25, 1987 | Jack Smith
Whatever happened to Rube Goldberg? Rube died in 1970 at the age of 87. That's what happened to Rube Goldberg. What I mean is, whatever happened to his mad vision of this age of technology? For those who are too young to remember him, Goldberg was a cartoonist who specialized in drawing ingenious inventions that accomplished trivial ends through laboriously complicated machinery. He satirized this marvelously inventive century in a way that we no longer seem to do.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Something looks amiss outside this house on Plumosa Drive in Pasadena. Actually, a lot of things look amiss. Strewn about the front and side yards are wires and cords, a folding table overturned on the lawn, a children's stove smashed to pieces and, despite unseasonably hot afternoon temperatures, a pink umbrella abandoned beside the front door. It looks like a garage sale gone wrong. Or perhaps the beginning of clean-out day on "Hoarding: Buried Alive. " But on the backyard patio next to the pool, Debra Sterling explains that the mess outside (and inside too)
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | MORT ROSENBLUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Multipurpose Platform, with its belts and wheels and barrels, looks like some nonsensical contraption invented by Rube Goldberg. But it seems to work miracles in African villages. The platform uses a single motor for lots of things: husking rice, milling grain, pumping water, generating electricity, pressing vegetable oil, sawing timber, charging batteries, running tools.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Williams College Museum of Art in Williamstown, Mass., will exhibit 60 original drawings, sketches and cartoons by Rube Goldberg (1883-1970),whose cartoons pointed out the foibles of human nature, officials said. The exhibit, which opens Sept. 11 and runs through Oct. 25, spans the early and middle periods of Goldberg's career and includes a selection of weekly comic strips and drawings of inventions that best exemplify his work, exhibit curator Thomas Fels said.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Trying to make the simple ridiculously complicated, a team of student engineers in West Lafayette, Ind., built a contraption that puts a golf ball on a tee by way of a crashing miniature skier, a crossbow and a toy boat. The machine took 54 mechanical, electrical and fluid dynamic steps to tee up a regulation golf ball. It won first place in the 11th annual National Rube Goldberg Machine contest at Purdue University.
NEWS
November 19, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Something looks amiss outside this house on Plumosa Drive in Pasadena. Actually, a lot of things look amiss. Strewn about the front and side yards are wires and cords, a folding table overturned on the lawn, a children's stove smashed to pieces and, despite unseasonably hot afternoon temperatures, a pink umbrella abandoned beside the front door. It looks like a garage sale gone wrong. Or perhaps the beginning of clean-out day on "Hoarding: Buried Alive. " But on the backyard patio next to the pool, Debra Sterling explains that the mess outside (and inside too)
OPINION
June 22, 2002
Re "Cloning Receives a Makeover," June 17: "Words, words, words! They shut one off from the universe. Three-quarters of the time one's never in contact with things, only with the beastly words that stand for them." What Aldous Huxley once lamented as an existential poverty, human cloning entrepreneurs are now employing as the path to prosperity. By deploying sterile and bewildering jargon (e.g., "somatic cell nuclear transfer," "nuclear-transfer-derived blastocyst"), biotech capitalists have cordoned off the American public from the ghastly physical reality of cloned human beings.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
We all know them, people with a knack for turning the simplest tasks into incredibly cumbersome, complex chores--bureaucrats, plumbers, platoon sergeants, editors, whoever wrote the instruction manual for the video recorder. So it was bound to happen. On Saturday, Purdue University played host to the finals of the national Rube Goldberg machine contest, the first intercollegiate competition to elevate inefficiency to an art form.
OPINION
June 22, 2002
Re "Cloning Receives a Makeover," June 17: "Words, words, words! They shut one off from the universe. Three-quarters of the time one's never in contact with things, only with the beastly words that stand for them." What Aldous Huxley once lamented as an existential poverty, human cloning entrepreneurs are now employing as the path to prosperity. By deploying sterile and bewildering jargon (e.g., "somatic cell nuclear transfer," "nuclear-transfer-derived blastocyst"), biotech capitalists have cordoned off the American public from the ghastly physical reality of cloned human beings.
NEWS
February 28, 2002 | NINA J. EASTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Securing the financial freedom to paint is an age-old piece of the artist's life palette. For Washington artist Gary Goldberg, the freedom to produce critically acclaimed paintings has come from a thriving decorative business--murals and trompe l'oeil designs for homes and office buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | Steve Chawkins
Over the last few days, I've devoted much thought to a frightening question: Can an election--theoretically a process with all the beautiful simplicity of eenie-meenie-minie-moe--possibly be made any more complex than the current one? Bruce Bradley, Ventura County's elections chief, minced no words. "If there were a gap of just a few hundred votes here in California, it would make Florida look like a school picnic."
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Trying to make the simple ridiculously complicated, a team of student engineers in West Lafayette, Ind., built a contraption that puts a golf ball on a tee by way of a crashing miniature skier, a crossbow and a toy boat. The machine took 54 mechanical, electrical and fluid dynamic steps to tee up a regulation golf ball. It won first place in the 11th annual National Rube Goldberg Machine contest at Purdue University.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joel Hodgson was flying high. In fact, he was in orbit. As Joel Robinson, the sleepy-eyed, genially mopey janitor forced to sit through and heckle crummy movies on the award-winning cult TV hit "Mystery Science Theater 3000," Hodgson had critical acclaim and a loyal fan base. Sure, he was on cable, Monopoly money compared to network megabucks, but as creator and executive producer of his Minneapolis-based series, he had more creative freedom than most TV artists.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | MORT ROSENBLUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Multipurpose Platform, with its belts and wheels and barrels, looks like some nonsensical contraption invented by Rube Goldberg. But it seems to work miracles in African villages. The platform uses a single motor for lots of things: husking rice, milling grain, pumping water, generating electricity, pressing vegetable oil, sawing timber, charging batteries, running tools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | Steve Chawkins
Over the last few days, I've devoted much thought to a frightening question: Can an election--theoretically a process with all the beautiful simplicity of eenie-meenie-minie-moe--possibly be made any more complex than the current one? Bruce Bradley, Ventura County's elections chief, minced no words. "If there were a gap of just a few hundred votes here in California, it would make Florida look like a school picnic."
BUSINESS
May 16, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
The UCLA Film Archives' "The French Revolution and the Cinema" continues Thursday with "Danton" (1921) and "Les Chouans" (1946), which screen at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m., respectively, in Melnitz Theater. Adapted by Russian emigre director Dimitri Buchowetski from Georg Buchner's 1835 fragment "Danton's Death," the handsome German silent "Danton" stars Emil Jannings as the boisterous, sybaritic Danton and Werner Krauss as the ruthless, rigidly puritanical Robespierre. This "Danton" seems simplistic, despite the presence of two legendary actors, in comparison to Andrzej Wajda's recent "Danton" with Gerard Depardieu in the title role, but gains power in its climactic sequences, in which Danton bravely faces the Tribunal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1994 | ROBERT J. SAMUELSON, Robert J. Samuelson writes about economic issues from Washington.
Among other things, the Democratic health-care plans contain a large--and unjustified--multibillion-dollar tax on younger workers. You wonder whether most members of Congress know this or even care. The whole health-care debate is now completely out of control. The desperate effort to craft something that can be advertised as "universal coverage" means that Congress literally no longer knows what it's doing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1993 | TED MARMOR and JERRY MASHAW, Ted Marmor teaches public policy and Jerry Mashaw teaches law at Yale University. They are co-authors of "America's Misunderstood Welfare State" (Basic Books, 1992). and
President Clinton's proposal for health reform is paradoxical, full of both promise and peril. The Clinton task force has done a remarkable amount of work and the national climate seems ready for reform. Yet the failings of the plan are real, even menacing. The most telling is its failure to achieve one of Clinton's most important goals, simplifying American medicine's stupefyingly complex arrangements. Instead, the President's plan is a fragile Rube Goldberg contraption.
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