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NEWS
April 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Those traveling south of the border during the Easter holiday, especially pregnant women, are being warned about an outbreak of rubella in Mexico that is being blamed for more than two dozen cases in Texas. So far this year, 26 cases have been reported, including 18 in a U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service detention center in Port Isabel.
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SCIENCE
June 27, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Children who receive a single vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and chicken pox appear to have an increased risk of fever-related seizures in the days after the shot than do children who receive two separate vaccinations. A combination vaccine that protects against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (commonly known as chicken pox) was approved for use in 2005, providing an option for parents who wanted to stick one fewer needle in their small children. Since then, parents could choose either that single vaccine, called measles-mumps-rubella-varicella, or two separate shots, one for measles-mumps-rubella and one for varicella.
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NEWS
May 20, 1992 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
More than half the cases of birth defects that resulted from a German measles outbreak in Southern California in 1990 could have been prevented had health-care providers and others followed federal rubella-screening guidelines, a study has found. The study, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., found that 12 of 21 women who delivered babies with congenital rubella syndrome had missed earlier opportunities to be screened and vaccinated against rubella virus infection.
SCIENCE
February 2, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Twelve years after Dr. Andrew Wakefield published his research in the international medical journal the Lancet purporting that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine causes autism, the journal on Tuesday formally retracted the paper. The action came less than a week after the U.K. General Medical Council's Fitness to Practice Panel concluded that Wakefield had provided false information in the report and acted with "callous disregard" for the children in the study. The council is now considering whether Wakefield is guilty of serious professional misconduct.
NEWS
February 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rubella, the usually mild rash that can cause devastating birth defects, is making a comeback, largely among young adults who were never vaccinated, federal health researchers said in Atlanta. Rubella, sometimes known as German measles, was on the decline three years ago, when a record low 225 cases were reported nationwide. But 396 cases were reported in 1989, and 1,093 were reported last year, according to the national Centers for Disease Control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Concern that the rubella vaccine may cause chronic joint or nerve problems in some women appears to be unfounded and shouldn't deter women from getting immunized as a way to prevent birth defects, authors of a new study say. The practice of immunizing adult women against rubella, also called German measles, has been endangered by concern that the vaccine might cause disabling side effects in rare cases. Rubella can cause birth defects in babies born to women who become infected while pregnant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1994 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move to slash health care costs, the California Medical Assn. Monday said it wants to eliminate state requirements for premarital blood tests to detect German measles and syphilis. Premarital testing has not been effective in detecting these diseases and is costing California residents and insurers $20 million a year, said Dr. Val W. Slayton, who co-authored the proposal to eliminate the testing, which was adopted by CMA delegates meeting here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER
Children entering kindergarten in the Conejo Valley this fall can register for school through March 29. Parents should register at the schools their children will attend, taking with them immunization records and proof of residence. California requires that children be immunized for polio, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, measles, mumps and rubella. Children whose immunizations are not up to date by the time that school starts in September will not be allowed to attend class.
NEWS
January 12, 2003
Re "Vaccine/Autism Issue Was Presented Fairly," letters, Dec. 22: In a recent letter to the editor, I was dismissed as a "party-line hack" because I believe that vaccines are good for children. In reality, I am a pediatrician who specializes in infectious diseases, and I have seen too many children suffer and die from infections that could have been prevented through vaccination. So, yes, I am a strong proponent of immunizations. The writer sarcastically implies that vaccines are not necessary to protect children against "such calamities as rubella or hepatitis B."
TRAVEL
January 18, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Before going on a cruise, women who are of childbearing age or are pregnant should make sure they are immune to rubella (also called German or three-day measles), the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has cautioned. The caution comes on the heels of rubella outbreaks among crew on two cruise ships last year. Traditionally, the CDC has advised international travelers about rubella but not specifically cruise travelers, said Dr. Susan Maloney, CDC medical epidemiologist.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Chiron Corp. on Thursday recalled and withdrew a common childhood vaccine sold in Italy and several other foreign countries, compounding the biotech company's headaches as it recovers from production problems that caused a recent shortage of flu shots. The Emeryville, Calif.-based company's latest slip potentially affects about 5 million doses of Chiron's measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, called Morupar.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2005 | From Reuters
A new vaccine that combines four childhood immunizations has won approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Merck & Co. said Tuesday. The vaccine, called Proquad, is approved to protect children 12 months to 12 years of age against measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2005 | Elise Castelli, Times Staff Writer
Rubella, a virus known to cause birth defects, miscarriages and stillbirths, has been eliminated in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Monday. "This is an achievement ... but the story is not done yet," said Dr. Julie Gerberding, director of the CDC in Atlanta. "There are still parts of the world where immunization is not common or not common enough to prevent children from developing congenital rubella."
NEWS
January 12, 2003
Re "Vaccine/Autism Issue Was Presented Fairly," letters, Dec. 22: In a recent letter to the editor, I was dismissed as a "party-line hack" because I believe that vaccines are good for children. In reality, I am a pediatrician who specializes in infectious diseases, and I have seen too many children suffer and die from infections that could have been prevented through vaccination. So, yes, I am a strong proponent of immunizations. The writer sarcastically implies that vaccines are not necessary to protect children against "such calamities as rubella or hepatitis B."
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The controversial theory that the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine is largely responsible for the sharp increase in the incidence of autism over the last 15 years has no scientific justification, according to a report released Monday by the Institute of Medicine. The report is the latest in a series of studies that have reached the same conclusion. Epidemiological studies so far are too imprecise to rule out the possibility that a small number of children might be affected by vaccines, said Dr.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The controversial idea that the dramatic upsurge in autism over the last two decades was caused by the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine--a concept embraced by many parents--is wrong, according to a new report released today by the California Department of Health Services. The new study, like two others recently conducted in England and Finland, found that the rate of autism has been rising dramatically as the number of children vaccinated has remained virtually constant.
NEWS
January 29, 1985 | Associated Press
Oregon health officials formally launched a campaign today to eradicate Rubella, also known as German measles, which causes severe birth defects in unborn children. The program is the first in the nation and will be closely monitored by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta as federal officials prepare for a similar program around the country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Oregon health officials launched a campaign Tuesday to eradicate rubella, also know as German measles. The program is the first in the nation and will be closely monitored by the federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The target group is women 19 to 40 who have not been immunized against the disease, which causes severe birth defects in unborn children.
NEWS
April 11, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Those traveling south of the border during the Easter holiday, especially pregnant women, are being warned about an outbreak of rubella in Mexico that is being blamed for more than two dozen cases in Texas. So far this year, 26 cases have been reported, including 18 in a U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service detention center in Port Isabel.
TRAVEL
January 18, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Before going on a cruise, women who are of childbearing age or are pregnant should make sure they are immune to rubella (also called German or three-day measles), the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has cautioned. The caution comes on the heels of rubella outbreaks among crew on two cruise ships last year. Traditionally, the CDC has advised international travelers about rubella but not specifically cruise travelers, said Dr. Susan Maloney, CDC medical epidemiologist.
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