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Ruben Aquino

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2003 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
In Disney's current animated feature "Brother Bear," much of the dramatic action centers on Denahi (voice by Jason Raize), the Ice Age hunter who seeks revenge against the bear he believes killed his older and younger brothers. Animating Denahi was a difficult, unglamorous assignment -- humans are notoriously hard to animate, and the advertising for the film focused on Rutt and Tuke, the comic Moose brothers. But Ruben Aquino is used to tough tasks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2003 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
In Disney's current animated feature "Brother Bear," much of the dramatic action centers on Denahi (voice by Jason Raize), the Ice Age hunter who seeks revenge against the bear he believes killed his older and younger brothers. Animating Denahi was a difficult, unglamorous assignment -- humans are notoriously hard to animate, and the advertising for the film focused on Rutt and Tuke, the comic Moose brothers. But Ruben Aquino is used to tough tasks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1989
In the 1930s, animators spent hundreds of hours painstakingly drawing thousands of pictures on celluloid to create a single Mickey Mouse cartoon, only to have their work destroyed after the cartoon was filmed. Today, those same cels often bring tens of thousands of dollars at auction, where they have become a hot commodity among art collectors. Last June, a collector paid $121,000 for a black and white Mickey Mouse cel from the 1934 cartoon "The Orphan's Benefit."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2010 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Priscillano "Pres" Romanillos, the animator who brought to life the athletic Native American Little Creek in DreamWorks' "Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron" and the evil Shan-Yu in Disney's "Mulan," has died. He was 47. Romanillos died at his home in Tujunga on Saturday, surrounded by his family, friends and pets. The cause of death was complications from leukemia. During his 21-year career, Romanillos earned the respect of his fellow artists for his exceptional drawing ability and his enthusiasm for the art of animation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Although it has virtually nothing to do with Dickens, Disney's "Oliver & Company," (citywide) a new animated feature "inspired" by "Oliver Twist," is a bright, upbeat comedy that should appeal to audiences of all ages. The contemporary tone and broader, more cartoon-style animation puts "Oliver" in the tradition of "The Jungle Book," rather than "Pinocchio," and MTV seems to have been more of an influence than the European storybook illustrations of "Snow White."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Stuart Sumida leads a double life. In academia, the personable Sumida is a respected paleontologist who is a biology professor and graduate program coordinator at Cal State San Bernardino. But in Hollywood circles, he is the go-to guy animators rely on to bring them up to speed on animal anatomy and locomotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Midway through The Disney Studio's "The Little Mermaid," (citywide), there's a calypso number called "Under the Sea," led by a hyper-sensitive crab named Sebastian, with his "hot crustacean band." It's a no-place-like-home number, with Sebastian trying to persuade the title character, tawny-tressed Ariel, not to think that "the seaweed's greener . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1998 | Gish Jen, Gish Jen is the author of "Mona in the Promised Land." Her new book, "The Fortune-Telling Pineapple," will be published next year
For years it seemed that Asian women were doomed to be portrayed in American popular culture as dragon ladies, whores or as ever-suffering, submissive Madame Butterflies. But now, lo and behold, multiculturalism has spread out of the academy and brought us a new breed of startlingly smart, fiery, independent Asian women.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | JOHN CULHANE
"If I become human, I'll never be with my father or sisters again," says the mermaid on the screen. "That's right," says the sea witch Ursula, "but you'll have your man." On the word man, this flamboyant octopus villainess leers like Jack Nicholson--and no wonder. Disney animator Kathy Zielinski fell in love with Nicholson's leer when she saw "The Witches of Eastwick," analyzed the movement of muscles and flash of eyes that produce it, and adapted them to a sinister sea creature's countenance.
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