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Ruben Dario Carles

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NEWS
August 24, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fax machine in Ruben Dario Carles' 16th-story office overlooking Panama Bay hums constantly. Activity buzzes all around him: In one adjacent room sits an angry group of trash collectors demanding pay raises; in another, aides are launching a government investigation into an arms-smuggling scandal. Later a businessman in need of millions of dollars to develop Panama Canal land will come calling.
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NEWS
August 24, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fax machine in Ruben Dario Carles' 16th-story office overlooking Panama Bay hums constantly. Activity buzzes all around him: In one adjacent room sits an angry group of trash collectors demanding pay raises; in another, aides are launching a government investigation into an arms-smuggling scandal. Later a businessman in need of millions of dollars to develop Panama Canal land will come calling.
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NEWS
April 15, 1990 | CHRIS ANGELO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Noriega is gone, but one-third of Panamanians are out of work and unemployment has become the greatest threat to the new government. "It has to be resolved or the country will go into a spiral of robberies . . . strikes, demonstrations against the government and backlash against the United States," said Carlos Rodriguez, a Panamanian who is vice president of the American Chamber of Commerce. For now, there seems to be no opposition to President Guillermo Endara's new government. The end of Gen.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years and three months after U.S. troops invaded Panama and captured Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, the country appears poised to restore Noriega's old political party to power in the first free elections in decades. The startling turn of events reflects general disenchantment with the U.S.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama's first presidential election since a U.S. military invasion changed the country's history has boiled down to a contest between the onetime political party of ousted Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega and salsa star Ruben Blades. The unlikely options in today's vote speak to ways Panama has changed in the five years since the invasion, and ways it has not. The elections also highlight both the success and failure of a U.S. policy designed to build democracy.
MAGAZINE
April 24, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, Tracy Wilkinson is The Times' San Salvador Bureau chief
Ruben Blades--salsa star, Hollywood actor and Panamanian presidential candidate--is walking along the cracked red-brick streets of San Felipe, the ramshackle barrio in Panama City's old quarter where he grew up. "Hey, Ruben!" residents call out from their stoops and cluttered balconies. "Va pa'lante?" they ask, an inquiry about the state of Blades' campaign. Is it going well? "We're behind, but don't give up," he tells them.
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