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Ruben Martinez

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NEWS
September 15, 1994 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura Bookstore's Ed Elrod has planned three events this week to appeal to a variety of literary interests: The image of Costa Rica as a peaceful, democratic country that welcomes Americans as tourists and expatriate retirees is re-enforced in "Choose Costa Rica." Travel writer John Howells will sign his guide to living and investing in the Central American country at 2 p.m. Saturday. Unlike many of today's women mystery writers who create female crime solvers, J.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Desert America Boom and Bust in the New "New West" Rubén Martínez Metropolitan Books: 337 pp., $28 In his new book "Desert America: Boom and Bust in the New 'New West,'" Los Angeles writer Rubén Martínez leaves the city behind for the beauty and desolation of the dry, sparsely populated corners of what he calls the "inner West. " He alights in northern New Mexico, a land of pueblos and piñon trees, of sweeping vistas and old adobes. Many an adventurer and seeker has come to this land before him: Spanish conquistadors, American artists, New Age spiritualists, clipboard-toting Realtors.
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NEWS
June 3, 1992 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ruben Martinez, 29, has a Mexican father, a Salvadoran mother, an unusually interesting point of view and a ton of talent. He was raised in Los Angeles. His Mexican grandparents lived in Silverlake; his maternal grandparents still live in San Salvador. What goes wrong at times in this compelling book is summed up by the subtitle. While "The Other Side" is a perfect title, the subtitle is terrible. Earthquakes, saints, rock music?
BOOKS
October 30, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is at work on a study of the biblical book of Revelation and its role in American politics and pop culture.
IN 1970, when Richard Vasquez's "Chicano" was first published, the Mexican American civil rights movement -- a struggle for the visions and values embraced by the term "Chicanismo" -- was in full flower. His novel can be seen as a courageous effort to define and interpret that term. Now, on the 35th anniversary of its publication, "Chicano" has been reissued in English and Spanish editions and sheds a new and different light on the same phenomenon.
NEWS
June 6, 1985
A West Los Angeles man and his wife were arrested in the shooting death of the assistant manager of a Lucky supermarket during a robbery, El Monte police said. Ruben Martinez, 50, and Yvonne Martinez, 28, were booked on suspicion of murder and robbery after police found them hiding in a trash dumpster at a condominium complex near the market, Detective Ken Whary said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Ruben Martinez, the journalist and commentator known for his goatee and sharp repartee as former co-host of KCET's "Life & Times," was back in town this week after an extended absence. But he didn't show up at a newsroom, notebook in hand. Instead, he appeared Thursday on stage at the Echo, a guitar slung over his shoulder, leading his fine country-flavored outfit the Border Balladeers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Loudspeakers carry voices in Spanish and English into the streets. Activists brandishing walkie-talkies converse with their unseen comrades. Megaphones and video monitors bring still other voices and faces to a startled crowd. The setting could be the epicenter of a guerrilla combat zone. Or maybe it's just one of those avant-garde art-happenings we haven't seen much of for a decade or two.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Desert America Boom and Bust in the New "New West" Rubén Martínez Metropolitan Books: 337 pp., $28 In his new book "Desert America: Boom and Bust in the New 'New West,'" Los Angeles writer Rubén Martínez leaves the city behind for the beauty and desolation of the dry, sparsely populated corners of what he calls the "inner West. " He alights in northern New Mexico, a land of pueblos and piñon trees, of sweeping vistas and old adobes. Many an adventurer and seeker has come to this land before him: Spanish conquistadors, American artists, New Age spiritualists, clipboard-toting Realtors.
BOOKS
October 30, 2005 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is at work on a study of the biblical book of Revelation and its role in American politics and pop culture.
IN 1970, when Richard Vasquez's "Chicano" was first published, the Mexican American civil rights movement -- a struggle for the visions and values embraced by the term "Chicanismo" -- was in full flower. His novel can be seen as a courageous effort to define and interpret that term. Now, on the 35th anniversary of its publication, "Chicano" has been reissued in English and Spanish editions and sheds a new and different light on the same phenomenon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Ruben Martinez, the journalist and commentator known for his goatee and sharp repartee as former co-host of KCET's "Life & Times," was back in town this week after an extended absence. But he didn't show up at a newsroom, notebook in hand. Instead, he appeared Thursday on stage at the Echo, a guitar slung over his shoulder, leading his fine country-flavored outfit the Border Balladeers.
BOOKS
November 25, 2001 | YXTA MAYA MURRAY, Yxta Maya Murray, a professor at Loyola Law School, is the author of the novel "What It Takes to Get to Vegas."
We might imagine ourselves to be King Midas in the American culture we consume and create, touching outlanders with our satellite fingers and transfixing them with the desire for Cadillacs, ranch houses and Lakers tickets--a desire that can look to us like desperation in the case of our neighbor, Mexico, especially when one considers what risks its citizens sometimes take to cross our border.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Struggling writers will like Ruben Martinez the minute they learn a certain, small detail about his book "Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail" (Metropolitan, $26). Martinez missed his deadline by two years. "I did the romantic thing and got a house in the desert," he says. "But the words didn't come." He makes this confession without apologies as he walks along Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.
MAGAZINE
June 28, 1998 | RUBEN MARTINEZ, Ruben Martinez is the author of "The Other Side: Notes From New L.A., Mexico City and Beyond" (Vintage). This article will appear in a longer form next month in "Half and Half: Writers on Growing Up Biracial and Bicultural" (Pantheon Books)
I've always spent more time at movie houses or huddled next to a TV than with my nose between the pages of a book. I read only books directly related to my research and a few literary faves. Sit down with a 600-page best-selling biography? Who has time in the age of MTV? I want to see colors rippling across a wide screen. I want a soundtrack of violins and trumpets composed by a nonagenarian Russian emigre.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura Bookstore's Ed Elrod has planned three events this week to appeal to a variety of literary interests: The image of Costa Rica as a peaceful, democratic country that welcomes Americans as tourists and expatriate retirees is re-enforced in "Choose Costa Rica." Travel writer John Howells will sign his guide to living and investing in the Central American country at 2 p.m. Saturday. Unlike many of today's women mystery writers who create female crime solvers, J.A.
BOOKS
November 25, 2001 | YXTA MAYA MURRAY, Yxta Maya Murray, a professor at Loyola Law School, is the author of the novel "What It Takes to Get to Vegas."
We might imagine ourselves to be King Midas in the American culture we consume and create, touching outlanders with our satellite fingers and transfixing them with the desire for Cadillacs, ranch houses and Lakers tickets--a desire that can look to us like desperation in the case of our neighbor, Mexico, especially when one considers what risks its citizens sometimes take to cross our border.
NEWS
November 13, 2001 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Struggling writers will like Ruben Martinez the minute they learn a certain, small detail about his book "Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail" (Metropolitan, $26). Martinez missed his deadline by two years. "I did the romantic thing and got a house in the desert," he says. "But the words didn't come." He makes this confession without apologies as he walks along Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ruben Martinez, 29, has a Mexican father, a Salvadoran mother, an unusually interesting point of view and a ton of talent. He was raised in Los Angeles. His Mexican grandparents lived in Silverlake; his maternal grandparents still live in San Salvador. What goes wrong at times in this compelling book is summed up by the subtitle. While "The Other Side" is a perfect title, the subtitle is terrible. Earthquakes, saints, rock music?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Loudspeakers carry voices in Spanish and English into the streets. Activists brandishing walkie-talkies converse with their unseen comrades. Megaphones and video monitors bring still other voices and faces to a startled crowd. The setting could be the epicenter of a guerrilla combat zone. Or maybe it's just one of those avant-garde art-happenings we haven't seen much of for a decade or two.
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