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Ruben Salazar

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1999
Re "FBI Files Shed Little Light on Ruben Salazar's Death," Nov. 18: The event that occurred at the Silver Dollar cafe on the fateful day in 1970 can only be described as tragic and dubious. Tragic because an outspoken, courageous leader and true humanitarian was lost and dubious because of the questionable circumstances surrounding his death. It is no secret that Ruben Salazar was being unfairly targeted by the police for his fierce commentary and biting criticism. Salazar was but one victim of the politics of the time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Yvonne Villarreal
His is a name that has appeared in this publication's pages hundreds of times - as an author and as a subject. It's a name that calls up notions of the Latino struggle for civil rights and the radical Chicano movement in Los Angeles. It's also a name that initially made filmmaker Phillip Rodriguez groan when someone suggested the life behind the name as a subject for his next documentary. The legacy of former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist Ruben Salazar has reached folklore heights since the journalist's suspicious death in 1970 at age 42. And therein lies Rodriguez's point of contention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
Ruben Salazar, the former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist who became an engaged supporter of the radical Chicano movement in Los Angeles, died under mysterious circumstances in 1970. Now a new documentary set to air on PBS in April will reassess his life and the facts surrounding his death. "Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle," directed and produced by Phillip Rodriguez, will use information from newly released files, as well as interviews with Salazar's friends, family members and former co-workers at The Times to provide a compelling new biography.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
Ruben Salazar, the former Los Angeles Times reporter and columnist who became an engaged supporter of the radical Chicano movement in Los Angeles, died under mysterious circumstances in 1970. Now a new documentary set to air on PBS in April will reassess his life and the facts surrounding his death. "Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle," directed and produced by Phillip Rodriguez, will use information from newly released files, as well as interviews with Salazar's friends, family members and former co-workers at The Times to provide a compelling new biography.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Ruben Salazar had been lying on the floor of the Silver Dollar Bar for nearly three hours when a pair of homicide detectives from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department finally arrived to examine his body. It was Aug. 29, 1970. Night had fallen. The bar was dark and still stank of tear gas, so Dets. Donald Cannon and Conrad Alvarez donned masks and used "battle lamp" flashlights. Among the many facts in their report — the position of Salazar's body, the location of the tear-gas canister that killed him — they noted the button pinned to his jacket: "Chicano Moratorium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2011 | By Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies committed a series of tactical blunders that led to the 1970 slaying of journalist Ruben Salazar, but there is no evidence they intentionally targeted the newsman or had him under surveillance, according to a draft report by a civilian watchdog agency. The report by the Office of Independent Review, scheduled to be released at a news conference Tuesday, is the first outside examination of thousands of pages of Sheriff's Department records in a killing that has been clouded by suspicion, controversy and criticism for 40 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Raul Ruiz was sitting on a curb on Whittier Boulevard, drinking a soda after a hard day's work shooting photographs of a rally against the Vietnam War. Suddenly, a group of Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies approached the bar across the street. He snapped a few pictures and watched as the deputies fired tear-gas canisters through the bar's open front door. Then, after 15 minutes or so, the deputies made him leave. Hours later, Ruiz learned that Ruben Salazar, the best-known Mexican American journalist in L.A., had been killed inside the bar. "We've got to develop this film because I have a feeling I've got the shooting," he told his colleagues at La Raza, the magazine he helped run. In the darkroom, an image soon took form ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2010 | Hector Tobar
In life and in death, strange things happened to Ruben Salazar. In 1966, the legendary Times reporter found himself in Bong Son, covering the evacuation of civilians during the Vietnam War. Fellow foreign correspondent Joseph E. Brown was there with him. After three days of sleeping on the ground, the exhausted reporters landed the last hotel room in town. Their slumbers were interrupted by the sound of refugee children outside. "Without hesitation," Brown recalled, Salazar told the hotel owner: "Why not put them in our room?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2010 | By Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Reversing his previous decision, Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca said Tuesday that he was directing his staff to determine what records might be released regarding former Times columnist and KMEX-TV News Director Ruben Salazar, who was slain by a deputy in 1970. On Monday, Baca said he was denying a request by The Times for records that might shed light on the circumstances involving the newsman's slaying, in part because he lacked the resources to review the eight boxes of files.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca said Monday that he would allow limited public scrutiny of eight boxes of documents related to the slaying of journalist Ruben Salazar in a case that has been clouded by controversy and speculation for 40 years. Baca said the records, long kept confidential, will be available after the Sheriff's Department's civilian watchdog on Tuesday formally releases a report on Salazar's killing. A draft copy of that report was obtained by The Times and made public over the weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2013 | By Abby Sewell, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
A man's body was found in a riverbed in Pico Rivera on Thursday morning, but it was not immediately clear how he died or whether foul play was involved. A passerby found the body about 9:50 a.m. near the San Gabriel River pathway, about 75 yards south of San Gabriel Boulevard, said Lt. Robert Smith of the Pico Rivera sheriff's station. The body was found in the bushes on the bank of the river, he said. Sheriff's detectives were on scene awaiting the coroner and the man has not yet been identified, Smith said.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
For more than 40 years, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department has stubbornly fought off requests to turn over its records on the death of Mexican American journalist Ruben Salazar. The department's arguments against making the files public have amounted to little more than: it's too expensive, too time-consuming, or might compromise the privacy of some individuals. Last year the department was forced to rethink its position. In response to a California Public Records Act filed by The Times' Robert J. Lopez, the sheriff agreed to allow some journalists and academics to view the records.
OPINION
August 12, 2011
Doubts in Salazar case Re "Finally, transparency in the Ruben Salazar case," Column, Aug. 5 Although I'm grateful that the mysterious circumstances surrounding my father's death remain a matter of public interest, I must protest Hector Tobar's column. Last October, my family met with L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca; we were allowed to view eight boxes of original material, which we worked through for several days. Later, researchers got access. We all felt that important questions were still left unresolved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Ruben Salazar had been lying on the floor of the Silver Dollar Bar for nearly three hours when a pair of homicide detectives from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department finally arrived to examine his body. It was Aug. 29, 1970. Night had fallen. The bar was dark and still stank of tear gas, so Dets. Donald Cannon and Conrad Alvarez donned masks and used "battle lamp" flashlights. Among the many facts in their report — the position of Salazar's body, the location of the tear-gas canister that killed him — they noted the button pinned to his jacket: "Chicano Moratorium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2011 | By Robert J. Lopez and Robert Faturechi, Los Angeles Times
As officials formally released a report Tuesday on the slaying of journalist Ruben Salazar, people who knew the newsman applauded the review but said it would not end the suspicions that have clouded the case for the last 40 years. Salazar was killed by an L.A. County Sheriff's Department deputy who fired a tear-gas projectile into a darkened bar where Salazar was taking a break from covering a riot that had broken out in East Los Angeles, said Michael Gennaco, head of the Office of Independent Review, which prepared the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca said Monday that he would allow limited public scrutiny of eight boxes of documents related to the slaying of journalist Ruben Salazar in a case that has been clouded by controversy and speculation for 40 years. Baca said the records, long kept confidential, will be available after the Sheriff's Department's civilian watchdog on Tuesday formally releases a report on Salazar's killing. A draft copy of that report was obtained by The Times and made public over the weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Raul Ruiz was sitting on a curb on Whittier Boulevard, drinking a soda after a hard day's work shooting photographs of a rally against the Vietnam War. Suddenly, a group of Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies approached the bar across the street. He snapped a few pictures and watched as the deputies fired tear-gas canisters through the bar's open front door. Then, after 15 minutes or so, the deputies made him leave. Hours later, Ruiz learned that Ruben Salazar, the best-known Mexican American journalist in L.A., had been killed inside the bar. "We've got to develop this film because I have a feeling I've got the shooting," he told his colleagues at La Raza, the magazine he helped run. In the darkroom, an image soon took form ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2011 | By Robert Faturechi and Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca told The Times on Monday that he will allow the media to review eight boxes of documents related to the slaying of journalist Ruben Salazar, a case that has been clouded by controversy and speculation for 40 years. Baca said the records, long kept from public view, will be available after the Office of Independent Review formally releases its report on Salazar's slaying Tuesday. A draft copy of that report was obtained by The Times and made public over the weekend.
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