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Ruben Santiago Hudson

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May 20, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Ruben Santiago-Hudson has few clear memories of life before Nanny. His Nanny wasn't like the caregivers hired by affluent couples to look after the kids. This Nanny, otherwise known as Rachel Crosby, operated a couple of rooming houses and a taxi service in Lackawanna, N.Y., near Buffalo. But she stepped in to take care of little Ruben when his parents couldn't, and she remained his surrogate mother until her death in 1989. "With her, life was a carnival," he says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Ruben Santiago-Hudson has few clear memories of life before Nanny. His Nanny wasn't like the caregivers hired by affluent couples to look after the kids. This Nanny, otherwise known as Rachel Crosby, operated a couple of rooming houses and a taxi service in Lackawanna, N.Y., near Buffalo. But she stepped in to take care of little Ruben when his parents couldn't, and she remained his surrogate mother until her death in 1989. "With her, life was a carnival," he says.
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NEWS
June 30, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Keir Pearson and Terry George, who wrote "Hotel Rwanda," and Michael Kang, who wrote "The Motel," won the feature film awards Wednesday at the annual Humanitas Prizes, which honor film and TV scripts that "entertain, engage and enrich the viewing public." Television winners included Ruben Santiago-Hudson for the HBO movie "Lackawanna Blues," John Wells for an episode of NBC's "The West Wing" titled "NSF Thurmont," Kelly Ward and Cliff MacGillivray for an episode of PBS' "Jakers!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By David Ng
HBO has had much success turning such notable plays as "Wit," "Dinner with Friends" and "Angels in America" into cable-movie events. Now the premium cable channel is reportedly setting its sight on another theatrical title, "Stick Fly. "   Lydia R. Diamond's drama about a wealthy African American family staying on Martha's Vineyard opened in 2009 at the Matrix Theatre in Los Angeles. The play eventually made its way to Broadway in 2011, with a roster of producers that included pop singer Alicia Keys.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
Her boarders called her "Mother"; Ruben Santiago- Hudson called her "Nanny." She was goodness, patience, generosity and don't-mess-with-me strength in one incredible package. Santiago-Hudson, best-known for his Broadway role as Canewell in August Wilson's "Seven Guitars," pays tribute to her in his solo show "Lackawanna Blues," named after his hometown of Lackawanna, N.Y. On tour after an Obie Award-winning run in New York, he performs through Sunday at the Cerritos Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
At the start of "Seven Guitars," the seventh and latest in an extraordinary series of plays by August Wilson, a woman sings a blues song with the requisite double-entendre: "Anybody here want to try my cabbage?" She and the people sitting around her in the backyard of a tenement house have just been to a funeral. Immediately and almost imperceptibly, their sadness is layered over with the talk of life--just arguing and back-talking and teasing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Lackawanna Blues," which premieres Saturday night on HBO, brings Ruben Santiago-Hudson's autobiographical one-man show to the small screen, and it is a work less than the sum of its parts. "The Odd Couple" and "The Sound of Music" notwithstanding, not all works for the theater are effectively transferable to other mediums, and we have met one here.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1996 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
'Mary Poppins Hoppin' Mad!" cried the New York Post. Julie Andrews spurned the Tony nomination when she felt that the nominators spurned her show, the depressingly mediocre "Victor/Victoria." Because the Tonys are both an award and a national commercial, a sense of entitlement seems to cling to the annual event. Both Jackie Mason and David Merrick have tried to sue the folks who administer the Tony Awards. I can't remember anyone suing the Pulitzer committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Phylicia Rashad, who became a TV star 30 years ago as Clair Huxtable on NBC's "The Cosby Show," is also a Tony Award-winning actress ("A Raisin in the Sun") and an acclaimed theater director. She is directing the Mark Taper Forum's production of August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," the playwright's second installment in his decade-by-decade exploration of African American life, which runs from April 24 through June 9. Rashad talked about directing "Joe Turner" on the phone from New York, where she was casting the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
If you have gone outside at all in the last few weeks, you have likely seen the peerless face of Halle Berry magnified manyfold, looking down at you from one billboard or another announcing the Oprah Winfrey-produced adaptation of Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God," airing Sunday on ABC. First published in 1937, forgotten, and rediscovered in the '70s, the novel has multiple concerns.
NEWS
June 3, 1996 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Topping off what has been widely acknowledged as one of the most competitive seasons in recent Broadway history, the big winners at Sunday's Tony Awards were the groundbreaking musicals "Rent" and "Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk," which each took four honors. The Pulitzer-winning "Rent," a musical about East Village bohemians, won the top award, for best musical, over "Noise/Funk," the explosive rap-and-tap musical tale of African American history.
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