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March 9, 2008 | Emili Vesilind, Times Staff Writer
With geometric construction all over the fall runways, Isabel Toledo's influence has never been more potent. During her recent tenure as women's-wear designer for Anne Klein, Toledo helped lead a return to precision tailoring and powerful silhouettes, and after decades of languishing in down-market anonymity, Anne Klein was fresh and relevant again. But the high-end collection didn't last long -- it was shuttered late last year after only two seasons, and Toledo was let go. Now Toledo is back to designing her own line, which includes collaborating with her husband, artist Ruben Toledo.
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IMAGE
March 9, 2008 | Emili Vesilind, Times Staff Writer
With geometric construction all over the fall runways, Isabel Toledo's influence has never been more potent. During her recent tenure as women's-wear designer for Anne Klein, Toledo helped lead a return to precision tailoring and powerful silhouettes, and after decades of languishing in down-market anonymity, Anne Klein was fresh and relevant again. But the high-end collection didn't last long -- it was shuttered late last year after only two seasons, and Toledo was let go. Now Toledo is back to designing her own line, which includes collaborating with her husband, artist Ruben Toledo.
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NEWS
November 23, 2001 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
She's a neat freak, he's messy. She's stubborn, he throws in the towel. She doesn't like to shop, he does. Despite their differences, or perhaps because of them, New York designer Isabel Toledo and her artist husband, Ruben, have managed to become one of fashion's most innovative teams. They are lesser known than duos like Dolce & Gabbana or Badgley Mischka because they have chosen optimum creative freedom over commercial interests.
NEWS
November 23, 2001 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES FASHION WRITER
She's a neat freak, he's messy. She's stubborn, he throws in the towel. She doesn't like to shop, he does. Despite their differences, or perhaps because of them, New York designer Isabel Toledo and her artist husband, Ruben, have managed to become one of fashion's most innovative teams. They are lesser known than duos like Dolce & Gabbana or Badgley Mischka because they have chosen optimum creative freedom over commercial interests.
MAGAZINE
March 2, 2008 | Rose Apodaca
Illustrator Ruben Toledo, with his pencil-thin mustache and wide-legged trousers, and women's wear designer Isabel Toledo, with her cinched waists and bolero jackets, are the Fred and Ginger of the fashion world. (Isabel's line is at Nordstrom, Barneys New York and a smattering of top shops internationally.) This spring, the couple is off to Germany to oversee printing of "Fashionation," Ruben's book of artwork that will be published by Karl Lagerfeld's imprint, Edition 7L. But first, they'll come west from their New York home as they do most years to mentor students at Otis College of Art and Design.
SPORTS
February 13, 1993 | MARK SPINN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Empire League boys' soccer championship was there for Esperanza as soon as Greg Massey looked for it. Massey's goal with less than two minutes remaining gave the visiting Aztecs a 1-0 victory over El Dorado Friday, as well as sole possession of the league title. El Dorado (13-6-5, 6-2-2 in league) could have earned a co-championship with Esperanza (14-2-5, 8-0-2) with a victory, but Massey was in the right place at the right time to prevent that.
SPORTS
March 11, 1993
In other nonleague boys' volleyball: Garden Grove 3, Long Beach Wilson 0--Seth Hall had 11 kills as Garden Grove (2-1) swept, 15-9, 15-6, 15-4. Laguna Hills 3, Los Amigos 2--Jeff Sturdivan had 25 kills and Steve Parente had 51 assists for host Laguna Hills (3-0), which won, 15-13, 12-15, 15-13, 6-15, 16-14. Kiet Tran had 29 kills for Los Amigos (0-1). La Quinta 3, Valencia 2--Brad Huss had 27 kills to lead La Quinta (3-1) to a 16-14, 11-15, 15-11, 7-15, 15-2 victory.
IMAGE
December 13, 2009 | By Julie Neigher
Acerbic writer and social critic P.J. O'Rourke once advised that you should always read something "that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it." Tongue tucked in cheek? Sure. Still, it's a constructive axiom for the intelligent fashion and style connoisseur. Think of it this way: A book is like an outfit. You don't want to be seen reading the Members Only edition when you could be spotted thumbing through something catwalk cool, do you? Following is a holiday literary gift guide that focuses on the chic, the cheeky and the unusual.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2007 | Booth Moore, Times Staff Writer
FASHION WEEK ended here Friday, and skinny model debate aside, the shows were surprisingly low-key. There were no pop tarts on the runway -- or in the front row. Even Paris Hilton stayed home as the attention shifted away from celebrities and back to the clothes. Pragmatic is the word to describe this season of fashion that makes sense, is comfortable, grown-up, even work-ready. Designers turned down the volume and embraced a narrower silhouette.
NEWS
October 12, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
If you haven't heard of British eyewear brand Oliver Goldsmith, think of Michael Caine's signature black glasses, John Lennon's iconic granny glasses and Audrey Hepburn's oversize sunnies in “Breakfast at Tiffany's.” Other A-list clients of the heritage label include Sophia Loren, Jackie Kennedy Onassis, Princess Diana, Ursula Andress, the duke of Windsor, Peter Sellers and Mick Jagger. Grace Kelly owned at least 20 pairs of the glasses; Goldsmith once traveled to the palace in Monaco, where she commissioned him to create 11 pairs.
MAGAZINE
April 27, 2003 | Barbara Thornburg
Furniture impresario Ralph Pucci may have begun his career in the mannequin business, but he's no dummy when it comes to talent. A little more than a decade after Pucci's entree into furniture, his Ralph Pucci International is one of the most influential artisanal studios in the country.
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