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Ruben Zamora

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NEWS
September 29, 1987
Rebel leader Ruben Zamora said that peace talks planned in El Salvador on Sunday may ease tensions after nearly eight years of guerrilla war, but he asserted that President Reagan and some Salvadoran military officers oppose the talks. Zamora, who lives in exile in Nicaragua, will be one of the rebel representatives at the talks, scheduled to be held with officials of the government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte. "We need a political settlement to the war," Zamora said in an interview.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite facing a runoff for the presidency, the ruling right-wing party Tuesday claimed an "overwhelming victory" at the legislative and local levels in El Salvador's first elections since the civil war's end.
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NEWS
November 9, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist leader Ruben Zamora on Wednesday accused the army of killing two members of his small Popular Social Christian Movement and dumping their bullet-riddled bodies along with a third victim in the western provincial capital of Sonsonate. The killings are the latest in a three-week wave of political violence that has taken the lives of at least 17 civilians since the U.S.-backed government of President Alfredo Cristiani and leftist guerrillas held peace talks in Costa Rica last month.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As international observers Monday analyzed serious irregularities in El Salvador's first postwar elections, the presidential race appeared headed for a runoff between the government's right-wing party and a coalition of former guerrillas. U.N. peacekeepers, U.S. Congress members and other observers said disorganization, delays and other systemic problems prevented large numbers of Salvadorans from voting in Sunday's historic national elections, and they called for reform.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist political leader Ruben Zamora safely ended a 10-day return from exile Wednesday and said he is more convinced than ever that the only way to end an eight-year civil war here is to negotiate a settlement between the Salvadoran government and his guerrilla allies. The guerrillas "have to be part of our political reality, but they are not the only reality," Zamora said at the airport before leaving for his home in Managua. "We have to move towards a political solution to the war."
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite facing a runoff for the presidency, the ruling right-wing party Tuesday claimed an "overwhelming victory" at the legislative and local levels in El Salvador's first elections since the civil war's end.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist civilian political leaders allied to armed rebels fighting the government in the countryside announced an alliance Sunday with a small Social Democratic Party, thereby gaining a legal political platform and a means to participate in elections in El Salvador. Guillermo Ungo and Ruben Zamora, leaders of the Revolutionary Democratic Front, said they do not expect to run candidates in National Assembly elections scheduled for next March but have not made a firm decision.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As international observers Monday analyzed serious irregularities in El Salvador's first postwar elections, the presidential race appeared headed for a runoff between the government's right-wing party and a coalition of former guerrillas. U.N. peacekeepers, U.S. Congress members and other observers said disorganization, delays and other systemic problems prevented large numbers of Salvadorans from voting in Sunday's historic national elections, and they called for reform.
NEWS
November 23, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
President Jose Napoleon Duarte said Sunday that he will hold returning leftist politicians responsible for any military attacks by their guerrilla allies while they are in El Salvador. Duarte also ruled out meeting with either of the two Revolutionary Democratic Front leaders, Ruben Zamora and Guillermo Ungo, and he repeated earlier threats to jail them if they continue to maintain ties with the guerrilla Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After gaining their first seats in the National Assembly, leaders of political parties close to El Salvador's leftist guerrillas said Tuesday that their rightful share of votes in Sunday's election is being diminished by fraud that could undermine efforts to end the 11-year-old war. The guerrillas, meanwhile, ended their three-day election truce by shooting down a combat helicopter during a clash with the army, killing the pilot, co-pilot and gunner.
OPINION
October 31, 1993 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez, an editor at Pacific News Service, has written extensively on Central American politics. He is co-host of KCET's "Life and Times."
These are heady times for the Salvadoran left as the March, 1994, presidential elections draw nearer. For Ruben Zamora, they are times of personal and political vindication. Like so many Salvadorans, the founder of the Social Christian Popular Movement and long-time leader of the Democratic Revolutionary Front lived the conflict. His brother was killed by death squads in 1980, and he lived in exile until 1987, when he returned to help found the Democratic Convergence.
NEWS
March 13, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After gaining their first seats in the National Assembly, leaders of political parties close to El Salvador's leftist guerrillas said Tuesday that their rightful share of votes in Sunday's election is being diminished by fraud that could undermine efforts to end the 11-year-old war. The guerrillas, meanwhile, ended their three-day election truce by shooting down a combat helicopter during a clash with the army, killing the pilot, co-pilot and gunner.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leftist leader Ruben Zamora on Wednesday accused the army of killing two members of his small Popular Social Christian Movement and dumping their bullet-riddled bodies along with a third victim in the western provincial capital of Sonsonate. The killings are the latest in a three-week wave of political violence that has taken the lives of at least 17 civilians since the U.S.-backed government of President Alfredo Cristiani and leftist guerrillas held peace talks in Costa Rica last month.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist political leader Ruben Zamora safely ended a 10-day return from exile Wednesday and said he is more convinced than ever that the only way to end an eight-year civil war here is to negotiate a settlement between the Salvadoran government and his guerrilla allies. The guerrillas "have to be part of our political reality, but they are not the only reality," Zamora said at the airport before leaving for his home in Managua. "We have to move towards a political solution to the war."
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Leftist civilian political leaders allied to armed rebels fighting the government in the countryside announced an alliance Sunday with a small Social Democratic Party, thereby gaining a legal political platform and a means to participate in elections in El Salvador. Guillermo Ungo and Ruben Zamora, leaders of the Revolutionary Democratic Front, said they do not expect to run candidates in National Assembly elections scheduled for next March but have not made a firm decision.
NEWS
November 23, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
President Jose Napoleon Duarte said Sunday that he will hold returning leftist politicians responsible for any military attacks by their guerrilla allies while they are in El Salvador. Duarte also ruled out meeting with either of the two Revolutionary Democratic Front leaders, Ruben Zamora and Guillermo Ungo, and he repeated earlier threats to jail them if they continue to maintain ties with the guerrilla Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The stakes in Ruben Zamora's political gamble are as high as they come: life or death. An exiled social democrat allied with El Salvador's armed guerrillas, Zamora has decided to return home to the country he fled eight years ago after his brother was killed by a right-wing death squad. Zamora, 45, says he will go back to El Salvador before the Nov. 7 date set in a regional peace plan for cease-fires, amnesty programs and democratic reforms in the Central American countries at war.
OPINION
October 31, 1993 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez, an editor at Pacific News Service, has written extensively on Central American politics. He is co-host of KCET's "Life and Times."
These are heady times for the Salvadoran left as the March, 1994, presidential elections draw nearer. For Ruben Zamora, they are times of personal and political vindication. Like so many Salvadorans, the founder of the Social Christian Popular Movement and long-time leader of the Democratic Revolutionary Front lived the conflict. His brother was killed by death squads in 1980, and he lived in exile until 1987, when he returned to help found the Democratic Convergence.
NEWS
September 29, 1987
Rebel leader Ruben Zamora said that peace talks planned in El Salvador on Sunday may ease tensions after nearly eight years of guerrilla war, but he asserted that President Reagan and some Salvadoran military officers oppose the talks. Zamora, who lives in exile in Nicaragua, will be one of the rebel representatives at the talks, scheduled to be held with officials of the government of President Jose Napoleon Duarte. "We need a political settlement to the war," Zamora said in an interview.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The stakes in Ruben Zamora's political gamble are as high as they come: life or death. An exiled social democrat allied with El Salvador's armed guerrillas, Zamora has decided to return home to the country he fled eight years ago after his brother was killed by a right-wing death squad. Zamora, 45, says he will go back to El Salvador before the Nov. 7 date set in a regional peace plan for cease-fires, amnesty programs and democratic reforms in the Central American countries at war.
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