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Rubicon Theatre Company

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000
* The Ventura-based Richman Peace and Policy Foundation has chosen Rubicon Theatre Company for its 2000 Peace Award. The organization selected the theater company for its dedication to local art and culture. The company hosts a wide range of theater, art and music programs in Ventura. The Richman foundation is a local philanthropic group dedicated to peace. Library System's Education Programs Honored * The California Library Assn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
Through successive page, stage and film incarnations of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," Randle P. McMurphy, the boisterous con man-turned psych ward messiah, and his implacable nemesis, Big Nurse Ratched, have become dangerously iconic figures. Reclaiming dramatic complexity from familiar stereotypes is the challenge facing any revival of Dale Wasserman's adaptation of Ken Kesey's allegorical 1962 novel pitting a lone rebel against the Establishment.
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NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Philip Brandes
"Dancing at Lughnasa": It takes exceptionally fluid performances to maneuver through the intricate, emotional steps of Brian Friel's achingly eloquent memory play about an impoverished rural Irish family facing an end-of-summer harvest season in 1936. Ventura's Rubicon Theatre Company proves up to the challenge, with a stellar cast that evokes a bygone era in a foreign land with convincing naturalism. The play's meandering story line is likely to puzzle some viewers and frustrate others.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
After Julius Caesar's forces crossed the Rubicon River en route to Rome, there was no turning back. "Crossing the Rubicon" became a way to describe a risky but irrevocable decision. When the Rubicon Theatre Company started in 1998, founders Karyl Lynn Burns and James O'Neil chose the name Rubicon to affirm the value of taking risks. And certainly this married couple's decision to build the first professional theater company in Ventura entailed some risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By many accounts, Lillian Hellman was a witch on wheels, a world-class prevaricator whose backbiting has become the stuff of legend. Not that an author must empirically experience the world about which he or she is writing, but Hellman's own reputed ruthlessness may have given her special insight into Regina Giddens, the fading Southern belle whose amoral maneuverings form the crux of Hellman's period drama "The Little Foxes."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2004 | Lynne Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Five years after moving into the Laurel Theatre in downtown Ventura, the Rubicon Theatre Company is about to make the arrangement permanent. The 6-year-old Rubicon, which is purchasing the former church, entered a 60-day escrow period April 1, said Managing Director Norbert Tan. "It's going to allow us to really control our destiny," Tan said. Rubicon, the county's only professional theater troupe, is buying the Laurel from local businessmen Doug Halter and Joe Murray for $1.3 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2003 | Suzie St. John, Special to The Times
Norbert Tan knew his job as managing director of the Rubicon Theatre Company would be challenging. What he didn't know was that his first challenge was going to involve saving the only home the 5-year-old nonprofit group has ever known. Tan, who moved to Ventura from Washington, D.C., this summer, said it came as a shock when owner Doug Halter announced he was selling the Laurel Theatre for $1.5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2002 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
It started out with a budget of zero, high hopes and the help of friends like Ted Neely and Carl Anderson, stars of the original "Jesus Christ Superstar." Five years and 100,000 tickets later, the Rubicon Theatre Company boasts a budget of $1.6 million, visiting celebrities and a permanent home in downtown Ventura. That's quite a feat for a 207-seat company for which ticket sales account for only a third of the budget.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
After Julius Caesar's forces crossed the Rubicon River en route to Rome, there was no turning back. "Crossing the Rubicon" became a way to describe a risky but irrevocable decision. When the Rubicon Theatre Company started in 1998, founders Karyl Lynn Burns and James O'Neil chose the name Rubicon to affirm the value of taking risks. And certainly this married couple's decision to build the first professional theater company in Ventura entailed some risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2006 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
Through successive page, stage and film incarnations of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," Randle P. McMurphy, the boisterous con man-turned psych ward messiah, and his implacable nemesis, Big Nurse Ratched, have become dangerously iconic figures. Reclaiming dramatic complexity from familiar stereotypes is the challenge facing any revival of Dale Wasserman's adaptation of Ken Kesey's allegorical 1962 novel pitting a lone rebel against the Establishment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2004 | Lynne Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Five years after moving into the Laurel Theatre in downtown Ventura, the Rubicon Theatre Company is about to make the arrangement permanent. The 6-year-old Rubicon, which is purchasing the former church, entered a 60-day escrow period April 1, said Managing Director Norbert Tan. "It's going to allow us to really control our destiny," Tan said. Rubicon, the county's only professional theater troupe, is buying the Laurel from local businessmen Doug Halter and Joe Murray for $1.3 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2003 | Suzie St. John, Special to The Times
Norbert Tan knew his job as managing director of the Rubicon Theatre Company would be challenging. What he didn't know was that his first challenge was going to involve saving the only home the 5-year-old nonprofit group has ever known. Tan, who moved to Ventura from Washington, D.C., this summer, said it came as a shock when owner Doug Halter announced he was selling the Laurel Theatre for $1.5 million.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Philip Brandes
"Dancing at Lughnasa": It takes exceptionally fluid performances to maneuver through the intricate, emotional steps of Brian Friel's achingly eloquent memory play about an impoverished rural Irish family facing an end-of-summer harvest season in 1936. Ventura's Rubicon Theatre Company proves up to the challenge, with a stellar cast that evokes a bygone era in a foreign land with convincing naturalism. The play's meandering story line is likely to puzzle some viewers and frustrate others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2002 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
It started out with a budget of zero, high hopes and the help of friends like Ted Neely and Carl Anderson, stars of the original "Jesus Christ Superstar." Five years and 100,000 tickets later, the Rubicon Theatre Company boasts a budget of $1.6 million, visiting celebrities and a permanent home in downtown Ventura. That's quite a feat for a 207-seat company for which ticket sales account for only a third of the budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000
* The Ventura-based Richman Peace and Policy Foundation has chosen Rubicon Theatre Company for its 2000 Peace Award. The organization selected the theater company for its dedication to local art and culture. The company hosts a wide range of theater, art and music programs in Ventura. The Richman foundation is a local philanthropic group dedicated to peace. Library System's Education Programs Honored * The California Library Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Although stage musicals are often adapted from movies, very few plays of other genres grow from big-screen precedents. But here's one big exception. Dan Gordon turned his screenplay for "Murder in the First" into a legal drama that's receiving its premiere in a likable production from the fledgling Rubicon Theatre Company. With a cast that briefly includes Larry Hagman, the former J.R. Ewing of "Dallas," in a small role as a judge, it's at the Laurel Theatre in Ventura.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Although stage musicals are often adapted from movies, very few plays of other genres grow from big-screen precedents. But here's one big exception. Dan Gordon turned his screenplay for "Murder in the First" into a legal drama that's receiving its premiere in a likable production from the fledgling Rubicon Theatre Company. With a cast that briefly includes Larry Hagman, the former J.R. Ewing of "Dallas," in a small role as a judge, it's at the Laurel Theatre in Ventura.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2000 | CATHERINE BLAKE
Steve Allen and Jayne Meadows will star in the play "Love Letters," at 2 p.m. at the Laurel Theater in Ventura on Sunday. The play, put on by the Rubicon Theatre Company, chronicles a 50-year friendship from the 1920s through the 1970s. "One of the interesting things about this is we rotate different pairs of actors each night," said Karyl Lynn Burns, the executive director of the Rubicon Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By many accounts, Lillian Hellman was a witch on wheels, a world-class prevaricator whose backbiting has become the stuff of legend. Not that an author must empirically experience the world about which he or she is writing, but Hellman's own reputed ruthlessness may have given her special insight into Regina Giddens, the fading Southern belle whose amoral maneuverings form the crux of Hellman's period drama "The Little Foxes."
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