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Rubin Hurricane Carter

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By John Horn
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, who died Sunday at age 76, represented one of the most famous miscarriages of justice in recent American history: He served 19 years in prison for three murders before his convictions were set aside. But the former middleweight boxer also figured prominently in a Hollywood drama, this one focused on how negative publicity can destroy an Academy Awards campaign and how studios in the years that followed mastered the art of heading off Oscar criticism before it was too late.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By John Horn
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, who died Sunday at age 76, represented one of the most famous miscarriages of justice in recent American history: He served 19 years in prison for three murders before his convictions were set aside. But the former middleweight boxer also figured prominently in a Hollywood drama, this one focused on how negative publicity can destroy an Academy Awards campaign and how studios in the years that followed mastered the art of heading off Oscar criticism before it was too late.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the middleweight boxer whose wrongful triple-murder conviction inspired a film starring Denzel Washington and a song by Bob Dylan, died in Toronto on Sunday. He was 76. Carter, who died of complications from prostate cancer, had a difficult upbringing in New Jersey and served stints in prison for assault and robbery before channeling himself into boxing. In 1963, the Ring magazine listed him as one of its top 10 middleweight contenders of the year. Three years later, his fortunes changed drastically after he and his friend John Artis were pulled over by police looking for the perpetrators of a triple homicide at the Lafayette Bar and Grill in Paterson, N.J. The victims were white; witnesses said they saw two black men flee the scene in a white car with out-of-state license plates.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, the middleweight boxer whose wrongful triple-murder conviction inspired a film starring Denzel Washington and a song by Bob Dylan, died in Toronto on Sunday. He was 76. Carter, who died of complications from prostate cancer, had a difficult upbringing in New Jersey and served stints in prison for assault and robbery before channeling himself into boxing. In 1963, the Ring magazine listed him as one of its top 10 middleweight contenders of the year. Three years later, his fortunes changed drastically after he and his friend John Artis were pulled over by police looking for the perpetrators of a triple homicide at the Lafayette Bar and Grill in Paterson, N.J. The victims were white; witnesses said they saw two black men flee the scene in a white car with out-of-state license plates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Rubin "Hurricane" Carter was at his best as a boxer, it would have been impossible to foresee Nelson Mandela or Bob Dylan doing him any favors. With his fearsome, drop-dead glare, precisely cut goatee and glistening, shaved head, Carter was violent and swaggering, a white racist's caricature of a dangerous black man. Talking to sportswriter Milton Gross for a 1964 story in the Saturday Evening Post, Carter made a widely publicized joking remark about killing cops in Harlem.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, Lorenza Munoz is a Times staff writer
Rubin "Hurricane" Carter's eyes were riveted on Denzel Washington. The onetime prizefighter known for fixing his intense glare on opponents in the ring was staring hard at the actor as the two sat down to lunch, trying to figure out what was different about Washington's movement, smile, laugh, mannerisms. It's not that he was star-struck. Far from it. The pair had been meeting off and on for nearly a decade with hopes of one day making a movie about Carter's remarkable life story.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2000
Amy Wallace's article on the varying accusations of distortion leveled against "The Hurricane" and "The Insider" missed the most obvious reason why academy voters may have taken the controversy surrounding "The Hurricane" more seriously than the one surrounding "The Insider" ("Split Decision Over 'Hurricane,' 'Insider,' " Feb. 16). If the tobacco lobby feels that "The Insider" portrays them unfairly, I don't really think this is going to bother too many people, since, after all, the industry has done more than its share of lying in the past.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | Associated Press
A state judge on Friday formally dismissed 22-year-old triple murder charges against Rubin (Hurricane) Carter, a week after prosecutors said they would not seek a third trial of the former boxer. "I'm joyous with the result and deeply satisfied that justice finally has been done and the charges dismissed," Carter's attorney, Myron Beldock, said after Superior Court Judge Ralph V. Martin signed the order dismissing the indictment against Carter and John Artis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2000
I read with great interest Robert Welkos' article about the difficulty of adapting true-life stories to the screen ("Digging for the Truth," March 12). It's an arduous task to please all the people involved in a real-life event. In the case of the movie "The Hurricane," critics have unfairly taken aim at both Rubin "Hurricane" Carter and Denzel Washington, who plays him in the film. It's tough to figure who's getting the worse deal: Hurricane Carter, who because the movie of his life is up for an Oscar, is suddenly being retried in the media and on the Internet; or Denzel Washington, whose beautiful and poetic performance has been caught up in the controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
When Rubin "Hurricane" Carter was at his best as a boxer, it would have been impossible to foresee Nelson Mandela or Bob Dylan doing him any favors. With his fearsome, drop-dead glare, precisely cut goatee and glistening, shaved head, Carter was violent and swaggering, a white racist's caricature of a dangerous black man. Talking to sportswriter Milton Gross for a 1964 story in the Saturday Evening Post, Carter made a widely publicized joking remark about killing cops in Harlem.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2000
I read with great interest Robert Welkos' article about the difficulty of adapting true-life stories to the screen ("Digging for the Truth," March 12). It's an arduous task to please all the people involved in a real-life event. In the case of the movie "The Hurricane," critics have unfairly taken aim at both Rubin "Hurricane" Carter and Denzel Washington, who plays him in the film. It's tough to figure who's getting the worse deal: Hurricane Carter, who because the movie of his life is up for an Oscar, is suddenly being retried in the media and on the Internet; or Denzel Washington, whose beautiful and poetic performance has been caught up in the controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Usually when inmates watch a movie at the Pitchess Detention Center, it is on 19-inch television screens, said inmate Daniel Kilcoyne. And sheriff's deputies pick the films, which are not recent releases, he said. But that changed Friday, when about 120 inmates gathered to listen to Rubin "Hurricane" Carter and to watch the movie based on his life. This time, the film was shown on a large screen in the maximum security center's library. The Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2000
Amy Wallace's article on the varying accusations of distortion leveled against "The Hurricane" and "The Insider" missed the most obvious reason why academy voters may have taken the controversy surrounding "The Hurricane" more seriously than the one surrounding "The Insider" ("Split Decision Over 'Hurricane,' 'Insider,' " Feb. 16). If the tobacco lobby feels that "The Insider" portrays them unfairly, I don't really think this is going to bother too many people, since, after all, the industry has done more than its share of lying in the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2000 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversy about the veracity of Universal Pictures' "The Hurricane" appeared to take a toll Tuesday, when the film, once seen as a formidable Academy Award contender, garnered only one nomination--best actor for Denzel Washington. The film, which tells the story of boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter's imprisonment on a false murder charge, has been accused of distorting history and falsifying Carter's legal battles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2000 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Universal Pictures launched "The Hurricane" at the end of December, the studio not only thought the film starring Denzel Washington was a potential hit but a formidable Academy Awards contender. But in the weeks following its release, the studio and Beacon Pictures, which co-financed the picture, have been embroiled in an ugly media battle over the movie's veracity, which many in Hollywood believe has badly tarnished its Oscar aura.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2000
There's been much writing in the Calendar section over the last few weeks about who should be nominated for the upcoming Academy Awards, but I'd like to suggest someone who does not deserve a nomination. Jim Carrey's performance as the late, great Andy Kaufman in "Man on the Moon" is an imitation and nothing more. Carrey's smug, back-patting insistence that he "became" Kaufman is an insult to the artistry of Kaufman and to every actor throughout the world who simply "acts." You never hear Denzel Washington jabbering to the press about how he "became" Malcolm X or Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, and his work is more satisfying (and accolade-worthy)
NEWS
November 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Former boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter came down from Canada on Friday to tell Americans that it's time to abolish the death penalty. Carter, who spent nearly 20 years in a New Jersey prison after his conviction for three murders, spoke before more than 700 people during a panel discussion at the National Conference on Wrongful Convictions and the Death Penalty. "I am not pleased to be here under these circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2000
There's been much writing in the Calendar section over the last few weeks about who should be nominated for the upcoming Academy Awards, but I'd like to suggest someone who does not deserve a nomination. Jim Carrey's performance as the late, great Andy Kaufman in "Man on the Moon" is an imitation and nothing more. Carrey's smug, back-patting insistence that he "became" Kaufman is an insult to the artistry of Kaufman and to every actor throughout the world who simply "acts." You never hear Denzel Washington jabbering to the press about how he "became" Malcolm X or Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, and his work is more satisfying (and accolade-worthy)
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS and SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a year when Hollywood tried not only to entertain but educate and enlighten movie audiences, the Golden Globes were awarded Sunday night to films that dealt with social injustice, the human drama, dark satire and even an odd assortment of toys with a heart and a mission. "American Beauty," a bleak fable about a middle-age Everyman stuck in a boring job and a loveless marriage, won three Golden Globes--including best feature-length drama, director and screenplay. The win vaulted the Sam Mendes-directed film to the head of the pack in the all-important Academy Awards race.
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