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May 30, 2009 | Associated Press
The government will give the two impoverished child stars of the hit movie "Slumdog Millionaire" new homes, the state's top official said Friday, creating the possibility that the homeless children will soon own not one but two new apartments. Rubina Ali, 9, and Azharuddin Mohammed Ismail, 10, both lost their homes this month when authorities demolished parts of their slum in Mumbai. Ashok Chavan, the chief minister of the state of Maharashtra, said he approved the transfer of two government apartments to the children on Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010
Obama's election, in song A musical about Barack Obama's "Yes we can" election campaign premieres in Germany this weekend, including love songs by the president to his wife Michelle and duets with Hillary Clinton. Even John McCain and Sarah Palin are given stage time, with actors portraying the losing Republican candidates and belting out songs on their behalf. In all, 30 singers, actors and dancers are to perform in the musical "Hope -- the Obama Musical Story" when it opens at the Jahrhunderthalle concert hall in Frankfurt in a bilingual mix of English and German.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009
Re " 'Slumdog' Home Destroyed," QuickTakes, May 21: Oh, Danny Boy(le), the pipes are calling, where have you gone? Why have you abandoned the children on whose backs your project amassed over $326 million? You tore them from their nightmare to live a pleasant dream, but only for a moment -- at least until they'd exhausted their usefulness, to then be cast aside. They graciously were then allowed to fall back into poverty, wakened from a stupor so sweet it served only to harden the bitterness of their reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | Associated Press
Two child stars of "Slumdog Millionaire" are at risk of losing their monthly stipend and their trust fund if they don't at- tend school more regularly, a trustee for the fund said Thursday. Azharuddin Mohammed Ismail, 11, and Rubina Ali, 10, shot to fame after starring in the Oscar-winning movie. But these days, Azhar is showing up at school only 37% of the time, and Rubina has only a 27% attendance rate, the trustee said. "It's pathetic," said Noshir Dadrawala, who helps administer the Jai Ho trust established by the filmmakers to provide an education, living allowance and housing for the young stars, who both grew up in Mumbai's real-life shantytowns.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | Associated Press
Two child stars of "Slumdog Millionaire" are at risk of losing their monthly stipend and their trust fund if they don't at- tend school more regularly, a trustee for the fund said Thursday. Azharuddin Mohammed Ismail, 11, and Rubina Ali, 10, shot to fame after starring in the Oscar-winning movie. But these days, Azhar is showing up at school only 37% of the time, and Rubina has only a 27% attendance rate, the trustee said. "It's pathetic," said Noshir Dadrawala, who helps administer the Jai Ho trust established by the filmmakers to provide an education, living allowance and housing for the young stars, who both grew up in Mumbai's real-life shantytowns.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009 | Associated Press
The makers of the hit movie "Slumdog Millionaire" have bought a new home for one of the two child stars discovered in Mumbai's slums. Both children lost their homes last month when authorities demolished parts of their slum here. The purchase of a 250-square-foot, one-bedroom apartment for the family of Azharuddin Mohammed Ismail, 10, was completed Monday, said Nirja Mattoo, who helps oversee the Jai Ho trust set up by the filmmakers to help Azharuddin and his 9-year-old costar, Rubina Ali.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2009
Re " 'Slumdog' Home Destroyed," QuickTakes, May 21: Oh, Danny Boy(le), the pipes are calling, where have you gone? Why have you abandoned the children on whose backs your project amassed over $326 million? You tore them from their nightmare to live a pleasant dream, but only for a moment -- at least until they'd exhausted their usefulness, to then be cast aside. They graciously were then allowed to fall back into poverty, wakened from a stupor so sweet it served only to harden the bitterness of their reality.
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