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Rubio Canyon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2002 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Talk about being between a rock and a hard place. Forestry officials agonizing over what to do about an avalanche that has buried six scenic Altadena waterfalls and part of a historic mountain tourist site have to decide whether to spend millions of dollars on a quick cleanup -- or do it slowly, and perhaps for free. An estimated 50,000 tons of granite boulders dislodged by a 1998 construction accident fill a portion of Rubio Canyon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Those hunting for a way to restore a once-scenic canyon above Pasadena have turned to shotguns. Work crews will break up large boulders clogging parts of historic Rubio Canyon since a 1998 avalanche by drilling holes in them and firing off shotgun shells inside to blow them apart, the U.S. Forest Service says. After that, leftover chunks will be randomly distributed by hand throughout the canyon, which a century ago was one of Los Angeles' top tourist attractions.
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REAL ESTATE
May 18, 1986 | EVELYN De WOLFE
Thaddeus Lowe, a professor and pioneer aeronaut who founded the Army Balloon Corps during the Civil War, came to reside in Pasadena in 1888 and turned a 6,100-foot mountain into a major tourist attraction between 1893 and 1938. The first segment of the trip to Mt. Lowe was made by Pacific Electric Railway from Los Angeles via Pasadena. Beyond Altadena, the ascent was made by the Mount Lowe Railway on a funicular that was 3,000 feet long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2002 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Talk about being between a rock and a hard place. Forestry officials agonizing over what to do about an avalanche that has buried six scenic Altadena waterfalls and part of a historic mountain tourist site have to decide whether to spend millions of dollars on a quick cleanup -- or do it slowly, and perhaps for free. An estimated 50,000 tons of granite boulders dislodged by a 1998 construction accident fill a portion of Rubio Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The roaring waterfalls of Rubio Canyon were one of Los Angeles' top tourist attractions 100 years ago. Carved into cliffs a mile above Altadena and fed by a crystal-clear, year-round stream, they were a must-see for sightseers traveling to nearby Mt. Lowe on an unusual mountain trolley that operated until 1936. The falls remained a popular hiking destination until a year ago--when they suddenly disappeared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2007 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Those hunting for a way to restore a once-scenic canyon above Pasadena have turned to shotguns. Work crews will break up large boulders clogging parts of historic Rubio Canyon since a 1998 avalanche by drilling holes in them and firing off shotgun shells inside to blow them apart, the U.S. Forest Service says. After that, leftover chunks will be randomly distributed by hand throughout the canyon, which a century ago was one of Los Angeles' top tourist attractions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2006
July 4, 1893: The world's first electric-powered mountain railway opened above Altadena, with accompanying music from the Pasadena City Band, which rode in the first cable car from Rubio Canyon to Echo Mountain. White-knuckled passengers on the Mt. Lowe Scenic Railway held on tightly as the car began its ascent. At the base of Echo Mountain, some stopped to enjoy the amenities at the Rubio Hotel and pavilion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1999
State officials said Monday they plan to pay for an engineering study that will examine alternatives for removing thousands of tons of rocks and debris that buried six historic Rubio Canyon waterfalls after a construction accident. The state Office of Emergency Services will pay the entire $62,000 cost of the study and then seek reimbursement from agencies that are eventually held responsible for last year's rockslide, said state Sen. Adam B. Schiff, a Burbank Democrat.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | JOHN McKINNEY, JOHN McKINNEY, McKinney is the author of hiking books and a regular contributor to The Times
Thaddeus Sobreski Coulincourt Lowe--a professor, inventor, Civil War balloonist, and man of fame and fortune--was the quintessential California dreamer. One of his dreams was to build a railway into, and a resort complex atop, the San Gabriel Mountains high above Pasadena. In the 1890s, his dream became a reality. During the height of its popularity, millions took Lowe's "Railway to the Clouds" to fine hotels to see spectacular views of Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The roaring waterfalls of Rubio Canyon were one of Los Angeles' top tourist attractions 100 years ago. Carved into cliffs a mile above Altadena and fed by a crystal-clear, year-round stream, they were a must-see for sightseers traveling to nearby Mt. Lowe on an unusual mountain trolley that operated until 1936. The falls remained a popular hiking destination until a year ago--when they suddenly disappeared.
REAL ESTATE
May 18, 1986 | EVELYN De WOLFE
Thaddeus Lowe, a professor and pioneer aeronaut who founded the Army Balloon Corps during the Civil War, came to reside in Pasadena in 1888 and turned a 6,100-foot mountain into a major tourist attraction between 1893 and 1938. The first segment of the trip to Mt. Lowe was made by Pacific Electric Railway from Los Angeles via Pasadena. Beyond Altadena, the ascent was made by the Mount Lowe Railway on a funicular that was 3,000 feet long.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
Too bad Thaddeus Lowe is not around to cast a little light on Rubio Canyon's problems. After all, his 6-million-candlepower searchlight was believed to be one of the world's brightest a century ago when it was perched on a mountaintop above the rugged Altadena gorge. The scenic canyon with seven waterfalls bearing names like Roaring Rift and Grand Chasm was a focal point of hotels, restaurants and a 3 1/2-mile narrow-gauge railroad to Mt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2002 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the decades known as the "Great Hiking Era," from the 1890s to the 1930s, a visionary and avid hiker built a "Railway to the Clouds"--which for a time became Los Angeles' foremost amusement ride. Thaddeus Sobieski Constantine Lowe and a partner conceived the world's first electric-powered mountain railway, the Mt. Lowe Scenic Railway above Altadena, which was considered one of the world's greatest engineering feats of the 19th century.
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