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Ruby Bridges

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The face of hatred is all the more terrifying when it belongs to someone we might know. To watch "Ruby Bridges," a story about desegregating New Orleans schools in 1960, is to look unblinkingly into that face--and to weep.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matt Damon and Ben Affleck, already Oscar and Golden Globe winners for the film "Good Will Hunting," added to their list of honors Thursday at the 24th annual Humanitas Prize presentation, recognizing scripts that "communicate those values which most enrich the human person." The two actor-writers shared a $25,000 prize for their screenplay, which judges praised for displaying "the power of friendship, honesty and love to heal the wounds of the past."
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NEWS
September 11, 1995 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time she did this, 35 years ago, Ruby Bridges was surrounded by a mob of screaming people who wanted to kill her. "You little nigger, we're going to get you!" they shouted at the 6-year-old girl who had been chosen by a federal judge to integrate a New Orleans public school. "We're going to poison you until you choke to death!" Undaunted, Bridges climbed the stairs of William Frantz Elementary School and began the school year, escorted by 75 federal marshals.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The face of hatred is all the more terrifying when it belongs to someone we might know. To watch "Ruby Bridges," a story about desegregating New Orleans schools in 1960, is to look unblinkingly into that face--and to weep.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matt Damon and Ben Affleck, already Oscar and Golden Globe winners for the film "Good Will Hunting," added to their list of honors Thursday at the 24th annual Humanitas Prize presentation, recognizing scripts that "communicate those values which most enrich the human person." The two actor-writers shared a $25,000 prize for their screenplay, which judges praised for displaying "the power of friendship, honesty and love to heal the wounds of the past."
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | ALICE STEINBACH, THE BALTIMORE SUN
On an autumn day in 1960, Robert Coles was on his way to a session with his psychoanalyst when, suddenly, something occurred that changed the direction of his life. He was himself a young psychiatrist serving in the Air Force and the memory of that day in New Orleans remains among his most vivid. "I was driving along when I saw a shouting mob on the street and got out of my car to find out what was happening," said Coles, recalling the incident he describes as "a kind of conversion" in his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2002 | Patricia Ward Biederman, Times Staff Writer
The 140 fourth- and fifth-graders had been writing to one another since school started this fall, but they didn't meet face-to-face until Wednesday. Half were from nearby Serrania Avenue School, half from downtown's 93rd Street School. They gathered in the green bowl of a Woodland Hills park. Their matchmakers were the Los Angeles Museum of Tolerance and the Ruby Bridges Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1999
Books recommended for young readers by Ilene Abramson, senior librarian for the children's literature department, Los Angeles Public Library: Ilene's picks--Gifts for the holiday season. Toddlers: "The Baby Dances," by Kathy Henderson, illustrated by Tony Kerins A newborn's year of growth lovingly portrayed. * Preschool and kindergarten: "My Goose Betsy," by Trudi Braun, illustrated by John Bendall-Brunello Picture book explains the life of a goose.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2000
* Last week's Top 5 VHS rentals: "Runaway Bride," "Bowfinger," "Lake Placid," "The 13th Warrior" and 'The Thomas Crown Affair." * Last week's Top 5 VHS sellers: "Toy Story--Collector's Edition," "Pokemon: Wake Up Snorlax," "Pokemon: Jigglypuff Pop," 'The Matrix" (collector's edition) and "Payback." * Last week's Top 5 DVD sellers: "Runaway Bride," "'American Pie" (unrated), "The Matrix," "The Thomas Crown Affair" and "Entrapment."
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruby Nelle Bridges was only 6 years old when she helped change history: She became one of the first African American students to be integrated into the New Orleans public schools in 1960, and to do it she had to be escorted by federal marshals for her own safety. The story of the brave girl is re-created in "Ruby Bridges," a new family film on "The Wonderful World of Disney" (ABC, Sunday at 7 p.m.
NEWS
September 11, 1995 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time she did this, 35 years ago, Ruby Bridges was surrounded by a mob of screaming people who wanted to kill her. "You little nigger, we're going to get you!" they shouted at the 6-year-old girl who had been chosen by a federal judge to integrate a New Orleans public school. "We're going to poison you until you choke to death!" Undaunted, Bridges climbed the stairs of William Frantz Elementary School and began the school year, escorted by 75 federal marshals.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | ALICE STEINBACH, THE BALTIMORE SUN
On an autumn day in 1960, Robert Coles was on his way to a session with his psychoanalyst when, suddenly, something occurred that changed the direction of his life. He was himself a young psychiatrist serving in the Air Force and the memory of that day in New Orleans remains among his most vivid. "I was driving along when I saw a shouting mob on the street and got out of my car to find out what was happening," said Coles, recalling the incident he describes as "a kind of conversion" in his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
Historian and Harvard University scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. can still remember how moved and inspired he was as a high school senior watching a documentary about black American history narrated by Bill Cosby. The film was a key in launching his elite career as an educator and filmmaker. But Gates, who is also the director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, said the comprehensive story of African Americans dating from before the arrival of slaves to the present day has rarely been told, particularly in schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997
Re "Socializing Students for Anarchy," by Glenn Woiceshyn, Column Right, Feb. 18: I'm afraid the problem is not so much John Dewey as it is Plato. We want so much to believe that truth and knowledge equate with goodness and virtue. Unfortunately it's not quite that simple, and I regret Woiceshyn's use of a column to bash teachers and public education. Over the years since the 1950s, most of my high school students have gone on to successful and rewarding lives--some of them to prominent success.
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