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Ruby Dee

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1999
At her one-woman show, "My One Good Nerve: A Visit With Ruby Dee" at the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills, Ruby Dee will hold post-performance discussions with guests Attallah Shabazz, daughter of slain civil rights leader Malcolm X, on Tuesday; Yolanda King, daughter of slain civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, on June 8; and actress Diahann Carroll on June 22. The play is running through July 4. Tickets: (310) 859-2830.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2008 | David Germain, Associated Press
Ruby Dee and Hal Holbrook have rarely crossed paths in their acting careers, but they have much in common. Both were born in Cleveland a few months apart in the 1920s. Both developed an early passion for literature. Both shaped early professional lives largely on the stage and then gradually built half-century careers in film and television.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
If Ruby Dee has only one good nerve, as she claims in the title of her solo show at the Canon Theatre, it must be super-jumbo-sized. At age 74, she appears to be in the prime of life. Any performer of any age would envy Dee's ability to hold an audience for 2 1/2 hours. Her show is not a bland valedictory, nor is it a searing tell-all.
NEWS
January 30, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Who says there are no decent film roles for women over 40? Ruby Dee found one at 83. The longtime civil-rights activist and stage and screen actress' small role in Ridley Scott's "American Gangster" -- as the mother of ruthless Harlem drug kingpin Frank Lucas -- could have been fairly insignificant.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
The husband is 81; the wife is 74. Parents, and grandparents, several times over. In an era boasting a divorce rate of 50%, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in December. If you looked up "family values" in the dictionary, you'd expect to see their picture. So it is only to be expected, in separate conversations with these two model senior citizens, that talk would soon turn to sex.
NEWS
January 30, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Who says there are no decent film roles for women over 40? Ruby Dee found one at 83. The longtime civil-rights activist and stage and screen actress' small role in Ridley Scott's "American Gangster" -- as the mother of ruthless Harlem drug kingpin Frank Lucas -- could have been fairly insignificant.
NEWS
November 14, 2007
1. Cate Blanchett, "I'm Not There" 2. Amy Ryan, "Gone Baby Gone" 3. Tilda Swinton, "Michael Clayton" 4. Saoirse Ronan, "Atonement" 5. Ruby Dee, "American Gangster" -- Supporting actress: Judging by her dominance in our panelists' votes, Blanchett is a lock. Only Ryan comes close -- as the predominant No. 2 pick by 30 noted Buzzmeter insiders. Ruby Dee makes her first appearance in the Top 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2000
Susan King neglected to mention a modern-day director who has used a pretty impressive group of stock players in his films ("They're Company Men and Women," Nov. 26). That director would be one Spike Lee. The stock players are: Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee, Giancarlo Esposito, Samuel L. Jackson, Bill Nunn, Wesley Snipes, John and Nicholas Turturro, and Denzel Washington. Films they appeared in: "School Daze," "Do the Right Thing," "Mo' Better Blues," "Jungle Fever," "Malcolm X," "He Got Game."
MAGAZINE
November 2, 1997
David Freeman, discussing the fullness of women's lips, declares: "The fullest lips seem to belong to French women" ("Lasting Impressions," SoCal Style, Sept. 14). Say what? I think if he evaluated the lips of black women as a whole, we'd win, no questions asked. But Freeman doesn't even include black actresses in his memorable-lips list. What about Ruby Dee, Angela Bassett, Lela Rochon, Viveca A. Fox? Freeman seems to position blacks as invisible beings and perpetuates the idea that white women are the most beautiful in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1999
Actor-author-activist Ruby Dee performs her autobiographical evening of "hits, bits and skits" (to quote Dee herself) in "My One Good Nerve: A Visit With Ruby Dee" closing Sunday at the Can~on Theatre, 205 N. Can~on Drive, Beverly Hills. Today and Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 3 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m. $25 to $45. (310) 859-2830; (213) 365-3500.
NEWS
November 14, 2007
1. Cate Blanchett, "I'm Not There" 2. Amy Ryan, "Gone Baby Gone" 3. Tilda Swinton, "Michael Clayton" 4. Saoirse Ronan, "Atonement" 5. Ruby Dee, "American Gangster" -- Supporting actress: Judging by her dominance in our panelists' votes, Blanchett is a lock. Only Ryan comes close -- as the predominant No. 2 pick by 30 noted Buzzmeter insiders. Ruby Dee makes her first appearance in the Top 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2000
Susan King neglected to mention a modern-day director who has used a pretty impressive group of stock players in his films ("They're Company Men and Women," Nov. 26). That director would be one Spike Lee. The stock players are: Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee, Giancarlo Esposito, Samuel L. Jackson, Bill Nunn, Wesley Snipes, John and Nicholas Turturro, and Denzel Washington. Films they appeared in: "School Daze," "Do the Right Thing," "Mo' Better Blues," "Jungle Fever," "Malcolm X," "He Got Game."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1999
Actor-author-activist Ruby Dee performs her autobiographical evening of "hits, bits and skits" (to quote Dee herself) in "My One Good Nerve: A Visit With Ruby Dee" closing Sunday at the Can~on Theatre, 205 N. Can~on Drive, Beverly Hills. Today and Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 3 and 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m. $25 to $45. (310) 859-2830; (213) 365-3500.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1999
At her one-woman show, "My One Good Nerve: A Visit With Ruby Dee" at the Canon Theatre in Beverly Hills, Ruby Dee will hold post-performance discussions with guests Attallah Shabazz, daughter of slain civil rights leader Malcolm X, on Tuesday; Yolanda King, daughter of slain civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, on June 8; and actress Diahann Carroll on June 22. The play is running through July 4. Tickets: (310) 859-2830.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
If Ruby Dee has only one good nerve, as she claims in the title of her solo show at the Canon Theatre, it must be super-jumbo-sized. At age 74, she appears to be in the prime of life. Any performer of any age would envy Dee's ability to hold an audience for 2 1/2 hours. Her show is not a bland valedictory, nor is it a searing tell-all.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
The husband is 81; the wife is 74. Parents, and grandparents, several times over. In an era boasting a divorce rate of 50%, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in December. If you looked up "family values" in the dictionary, you'd expect to see their picture. So it is only to be expected, in separate conversations with these two model senior citizens, that talk would soon turn to sex.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Reinforcing the power of Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" as a sharp but compassionate commentary on racial relations during a long, hot Brooklyn summer day is a remarkable ensemble of superior performances. Danny Aiello as a proud, inflexible but fundamentally decent pizzeria owner, John Turturro as his hate-filled son and Lee himself as the pizza deliverer create individuals from what could have been only symbolic roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2008 | David Germain, Associated Press
Ruby Dee and Hal Holbrook have rarely crossed paths in their acting careers, but they have much in common. Both were born in Cleveland a few months apart in the 1920s. Both developed an early passion for literature. Both shaped early professional lives largely on the stage and then gradually built half-century careers in film and television.
MAGAZINE
November 2, 1997
David Freeman, discussing the fullness of women's lips, declares: "The fullest lips seem to belong to French women" ("Lasting Impressions," SoCal Style, Sept. 14). Say what? I think if he evaluated the lips of black women as a whole, we'd win, no questions asked. But Freeman doesn't even include black actresses in his memorable-lips list. What about Ruby Dee, Angela Bassett, Lela Rochon, Viveca A. Fox? Freeman seems to position blacks as invisible beings and perpetuates the idea that white women are the most beautiful in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Reinforcing the power of Spike Lee's "Do the Right Thing" as a sharp but compassionate commentary on racial relations during a long, hot Brooklyn summer day is a remarkable ensemble of superior performances. Danny Aiello as a proud, inflexible but fundamentally decent pizzeria owner, John Turturro as his hate-filled son and Lee himself as the pizza deliverer create individuals from what could have been only symbolic roles.
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