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Ruby Hinds

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Ruby Hinds' love of singing began innocently enough--as a child, at home, gathered around the piano with her two sisters while their mother played and coached. "I think whatever talent the three of us possess came from our mother. She could easily have sung opera professionally," suggests Hinds, who appears as one of eight soloists with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Hollywood Bowl tonight for a performance of Mahler's mighty Symphony No. 8.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not unusual for theatrical works to revisit the turbulent lives of talented and controversial musicians. Paul Robeson was the subject of "Robeson," a one-actor play in the late 1970s. Maria Callas received her diva's due in Terrence McNally's "Master Class," August Wilson probed the blues in "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" and Mozart had his turn on the boards in "Amadeus." Marian Anderson, one of the great singers of the 20th Century, would seem a less likely candidate for dramatization.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Ruby Hinds is one of those panoramic singers who sweeps all before her. She has a voice with a view. Whether holding forth for Philip Glass' "the CIVIL warS," as she did several years ago with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, or giving her first local recital, which she did Friday at Caltech in Ramo Auditorium, the statuesque mezzo commands a strong vantage in music that is epic or emblematic. She also looks the part.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1988 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Ruby Hinds is one of those panoramic singers who sweeps all before her. She has a voice with a view. Whether holding forth for Philip Glass' "the CIVIL warS," as she did several years ago with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, or giving her first local recital, which she did Friday at Caltech in Ramo Auditorium, the statuesque mezzo commands a strong vantage in music that is epic or emblematic. She also looks the part.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not unusual for theatrical works to revisit the turbulent lives of talented and controversial musicians. Paul Robeson was the subject of "Robeson," a one-actor play in the late 1970s. Maria Callas received her diva's due in Terrence McNally's "Master Class," August Wilson probed the blues in "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom" and Mozart had his turn on the boards in "Amadeus." Marian Anderson, one of the great singers of the 20th Century, would seem a less likely candidate for dramatization.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
For all its gargantuan noise, for all its theatrical excess, a successful Verdi Requiem relies chiefly on four lone performers, the vocal quartet in the eye of the musical maelstrom. Unfortunately for Paul Salamunovich and the Los Angeles Master Chorale--who ended their season with the masterwork in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Saturday afternoon--half of their original foursome came down sick in the final days of preparation.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Veteran mezzo-soprano Ruby Hinds was the principal, with pointed assistance from violinist Lyndon Taylor and pianists Gloria Cheng and Robert Winter, on a program entitled, "The Dawn of Modernism" at the Getty Museum Saturday night. The fourth of five summer concerts at the Malibu space, this event, like those that preceded it, seemed to be one of the better-kept secrets of this outdoor music season--the concerts are given in the Inner Peristyle Garden at the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2013 | By Philip Brandes
As a snapshot of Harlem in 1943, John Henry Redwood's “The Old Settler” evokes some historical artifacts that have faded into obscurity - party line telephones, the Savoy Ballroom - and others that stubbornly endure in more camouflaged form, i.e., segregationist tactics that stack the economic deck. Nevertheless, Redwood's 1998 romantic dramedy is first and foremost a humanist work with a vision of endurance and connectedness that transcends race and politics, and its best qualities are admirably served in William Stanford Davis' fine staging at the Pico Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
Harassed by a single but noisy helicopter in the quiet opening section of Part II of Gustav Mahler's gargantuan Symphony No. 8, Tuesday night, Michael Tilson Thomas did not glower, or curse the skies, as some other conductors have done at Hollywood Bowl. He didn't halt the performance and give a speech, He didn't stop and wait for the intrusion to end. He simply left the stage. It was a dramatic gesture, coming as it did nearly a quarter-hour into the hourlong second movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
John Cage came to opera late, but not by degrees. When the late American composer jumped into the operatic pool--in 1987, in his 75th year--he did so with fervor, and with his unique artistic immersibility. Up to now, however, Cage's I Ching-operated "Europeras" had not reached these shores, the shores of Cage's native country--and, in the City of the Angels, his hometown. Not until Saturday night, when Long Beach Opera mounted "Europeras," Nos.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
Ruby Hinds' love of singing began innocently enough--as a child, at home, gathered around the piano with her two sisters while their mother played and coached. "I think whatever talent the three of us possess came from our mother. She could easily have sung opera professionally," suggests Hinds, who appears as one of eight soloists with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Hollywood Bowl tonight for a performance of Mahler's mighty Symphony No. 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Gustav Mahler could procrastinate over a score and stretch its composition into years. But in writing his Eighth Symphony, which an early--and crass--promoter dubbed "The Symphony of a Thousand" since it requires massed and multiple ensembles, Mahler didn't dawdle. Michael Tilson Thomas, who conducts the mighty Eighth in Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night describes the composer's process: "He wrote it in a burst of energy, in only eight weeks."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
A soloist lineup of familiar musical names--including Kiri Te Kanawa, Itzhak Perlman, James Galway, Shirley Verrett and Grace Bumbry--and two debutant conductors--Claus Peter Flor and Michelangelo Veltri--will appear at Hollywood Bowl in the 10-week summer season, July 9-Sept. 14. The schedule of outdoor concerts at the amphitheater, summer home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, offers subscription orchestral concerts on four nights of the week, plus special events.
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