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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | JULIE WHEELOCK
Tucked among the films on this weekend's eclectic AFI/L.A. FilmFest schedule are separate 100-minute tributes to two of Hollywood's best-known dancers: Ruby Keeler and Cyd Charisse. "I'm excited, honored and flattered," says Keeler, star of such memorable Hollywood musicals as "42nd Street" and "Footlight Parade." "It will be nice to see the clips." Keeler and the clips, compiled by program host and UC Berkeley professor of cinema history Albert Johnson, will be at the Cineplex Odeon Theatres in Century City at 2:30 p.m. today.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI
Known by fans as one of the happiest couples in Hollywood, Al Jolson and Ruby Keeler made their home in Encino during their 11-year marriage. The couple built their $150,000, 15-room house in 1935 on Louise Avenue south of Ventura Boulevard. It was set on 12 acres planted with lemon and orange trees. Radio dials decorated the rim of a backyard pool and loudspeakers were installed overhead. There the Jolsons raised their adopted son, Al Jr., who would later change his name to Peter. Al Sr.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1993 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thanks to film societies, revival houses, television and cassettes, those spectacular and delightfully corny musicals of the early 1930s have had a remarkable afterlife.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | KAREN WADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruby Keeler, the cherub-faced dancer who tapped her way to fame in the '20s and then five decades later managed it again, died Sunday. She died at her home in Rancho Mirage near Palm Springs of cancer, said her son, John Lowe. The centerpiece of Busby Berkeley's kaleidoscope of motion picture chorines was 83. Keeler's life resembled the rags-to-riches musicals she made famous.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | KAREN WADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruby Keeler, the cherub-faced dancer who tapped her way to fame in the '20s and then five decades later managed it again, died Sunday. She died at her home in Rancho Mirage near Palm Springs of cancer, said her son, John Lowe. The centerpiece of Busby Berkeley's kaleidoscope of motion picture chorines was 83. Keeler's life resembled the rags-to-riches musicals she made famous.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1931, when Ruby Keeler burst onto silver screens across America amid a shimmering, fantasy world of song and dance, her freshness seemed to epitomize innocence, exuberance and optimism, qualities that kept the country's dreams alive even in the midst of Depression hardships. The film was Busby Berkeley's "42nd Street," Keeler's screen debut, in which she played Peggy Sawyer, the ingenue who steps in to save the show when the star breaks her leg.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1997 | CLAIRE VITUCCI
Known by fans as one of the happiest couples in Hollywood, Al Jolson and Ruby Keeler made their home in Encino during their 11-year marriage. The couple built their $150,000, 15-room house in 1935 on Louise Avenue south of Ventura Boulevard. It was set on 12 acres planted with lemon and orange trees. Radio dials decorated the rim of a backyard pool and loudspeakers were installed overhead. There the Jolsons raised their adopted son, Al Jr., who would later change his name to Peter. Al Sr.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | JOSEPH N. BELL
If anyone who reads this runs across a print of a movie called "Sweetheart of the Campus," Ruby Keeler would like to hear from you. It was her last movie--made more than 40 years ago--and she's never seen it. "It must still be around," she said the other day at the Balboa Bay Club, "because I still get mail from people who say they've just seen it."
MAGAZINE
March 30, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Barbara Rush (not the actress, but an equally glamorous lady who made a fortune manufacturing computer parts for missiles) lives in Al Jolson's old house in Encino. Jolson fans sometimes drive straight to the house from Los Angeles International Airport and hammer at the front gate. Such pilgrims were frequent last year, the centenary of Jolson's birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Dancing With Legends: Movie dance legend Ruby Keeler will present the Professional Dancers Society's 1992 Gypsy Awards to Bob Hope and Cyd Charisse Sunday at the Century Plaza. A posthumous award for choreographer Nick Castle will be accepted by his widow, Millie, and son, producer-director Nick Castle Jr. Proceeds of this sixth annual luncheon will go toward establishing a retirement home for professional dancers and aiding dancers in immediate need.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1993 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thanks to film societies, revival houses, television and cassettes, those spectacular and delightfully corny musicals of the early 1930s have had a remarkable afterlife.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1931, when Ruby Keeler burst onto silver screens across America amid a shimmering, fantasy world of song and dance, her freshness seemed to epitomize innocence, exuberance and optimism, qualities that kept the country's dreams alive even in the midst of Depression hardships. The film was Busby Berkeley's "42nd Street," Keeler's screen debut, in which she played Peggy Sawyer, the ingenue who steps in to save the show when the star breaks her leg.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1989 | JULIE WHEELOCK
Tucked among the films on this weekend's eclectic AFI/L.A. FilmFest schedule are separate 100-minute tributes to two of Hollywood's best-known dancers: Ruby Keeler and Cyd Charisse. "I'm excited, honored and flattered," says Keeler, star of such memorable Hollywood musicals as "42nd Street" and "Footlight Parade." "It will be nice to see the clips." Keeler and the clips, compiled by program host and UC Berkeley professor of cinema history Albert Johnson, will be at the Cineplex Odeon Theatres in Century City at 2:30 p.m. today.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | JOSEPH N. BELL
If anyone who reads this runs across a print of a movie called "Sweetheart of the Campus," Ruby Keeler would like to hear from you. It was her last movie--made more than 40 years ago--and she's never seen it. "It must still be around," she said the other day at the Balboa Bay Club, "because I still get mail from people who say they've just seen it."
MAGAZINE
March 30, 1986 | BEVIS HILLIER
Barbara Rush (not the actress, but an equally glamorous lady who made a fortune manufacturing computer parts for missiles) lives in Al Jolson's old house in Encino. Jolson fans sometimes drive straight to the house from Los Angeles International Airport and hammer at the front gate. Such pilgrims were frequent last year, the centenary of Jolson's birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Norman Fell, Nanette Fabray, Ruby Keeler and Cesar Romero are among the several hundred seniors who have paid their $10 and signed up to participate in Secure Horizons' Senior Walk, scheduled for Sunday. Proceeds raised from the three-mile event, which is being held in conjunction with the third annual City of Los Angeles Marathon, will be donated to the Ethel Percy Andrus Gerontology Center at USC. Mayor Tom Bradley is scheduled to kickoff the event at 9:30 a.m. at the USC campus.
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