Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRuby Wax
IN THE NEWS

Ruby Wax

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
There may be people in L.A. who would find Ruby Wax's one-woman show, "Ruby Wax: Out of Her Mind," now at the Broad Stage's Edye Second Space, inaccessible. For example, those emotionally stable, positive thinkers who have never had a moment's self-doubt, much less stayed in bed for days at a stretch or considered walking into traffic. Or the no-nonsense type who would advise a depressed friend to "perk up. " But if L.A. contains such people -- and a survey of drivers at peak traffic hours might not turn up many -- I don't want to meet them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
There may be people in L.A. who would find Ruby Wax's one-woman show, "Ruby Wax: Out of Her Mind," now at the Broad Stage's Edye Second Space, inaccessible. For example, those emotionally stable, positive thinkers who have never had a moment's self-doubt, much less stayed in bed for days at a stretch or considered walking into traffic. Or the no-nonsense type who would advise a depressed friend to "perk up. " But if L.A. contains such people -- and a survey of drivers at peak traffic hours might not turn up many -- I don't want to meet them.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | HARRIET WINSLOW, THE WASHINGTON POST
Zany lady Ruby Wax has exported her outrageous interview show from British television to Fox on Monday nights. This woman is not afraid to ask anything, no matter how personal. Wax is American, and that is her real name. "My parents were from Austria and didn't understand that it's less a name and more a bird call," she joked. But she's lived in England for about 20 years, since she "ran away" from Chicago to study acting at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1999 | TOM GILBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In front of her omnipresent video camera, she managed to charm a deposed Imelda Marcos into revealing her vast, internationally derided shoe collection. As the tape rolled on other occasions, she jokingly called Roseanne a "big pig" to her face and poked a finger into one of Pamela Anderson Lee's breast implants--back when they were still in service. At the end of one of her most horrific (and well-publicized) interviews, she was even mock-stabbed with a banana by a giddy O.J. Simpson.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Pronto" / 8 p.m. Showtime "Columbo's" Peter Falk trades in his trenchcoat for Miami Beach threads to play a bookie on the lam in this adaptation of a novel by Elmore Leonard ("Get Shorty"). Harry Arno (Falk), who's been skimming off his boss for 20 years, decides the time is right to rent an Italian villa with his ex-stripper girlfriend (Glenne Headly). But with the mob in pursuit, Harry gets some help from a sharp-shooting U.S. marshal (James LeGros) assigned to protect him.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1999 | TOM GILBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In front of her omnipresent video camera, she managed to charm a deposed Imelda Marcos into revealing her vast, internationally derided shoe collection. As the tape rolled on other occasions, she jokingly called Roseanne a "big pig" to her face and poked a finger into one of Pamela Anderson Lee's breast implants--back when they were still in service. At the end of one of her most horrific (and well-publicized) interviews, she was even mock-stabbed with a banana by a giddy O.J. Simpson.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
He stands. Behind him is the curtain, facing him the studio audience, the camera and millions of faceless Americans preparing, once again, to be sent off to bed with an hour of light amusement and verbal vapor loosely defined as communication. He speaks. "Anyway, so how many of you saw Bill Clinton. . . ." He finishes the joke, then waits for the audience to finish laughing. He could be Carson or Leno or. . . . But he's not.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not unexpectedly, comedy, music and awards shows dominate this fall's specials. And a good many documentaries and retrospectives focus on President John F. Kennedy, marking what would have been his 75th birthday and the 30th anniversary of his assassination. Contemporary issues and concerns are examined in several other documentaries, with such disparate hosts as Walter Cronkite and Tony Danza.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Uh . . . what is this? That may be your response to "The Ruby Wax Show." It's a question neither Wax nor her new Fox series answers, which is one reason why it's such a raunchy kick. A bigger reason, of course, is Wax herself, whose pushy, coarse, obnoxious, loud, smart-ass New York yenta act elevates bad taste to a gleaming art. Like its self-mocking dumpling star, this show has no waistline, no shape or defining contours.
NEWS
June 15, 1997 | HARRIET WINSLOW, THE WASHINGTON POST
Zany lady Ruby Wax has exported her outrageous interview show from British television to Fox on Monday nights. This woman is not afraid to ask anything, no matter how personal. Wax is American, and that is her real name. "My parents were from Austria and didn't understand that it's less a name and more a bird call," she joked. But she's lived in England for about 20 years, since she "ran away" from Chicago to study acting at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
Uh . . . what is this? That may be your response to "The Ruby Wax Show." It's a question neither Wax nor her new Fox series answers, which is one reason why it's such a raunchy kick. A bigger reason, of course, is Wax herself, whose pushy, coarse, obnoxious, loud, smart-ass New York yenta act elevates bad taste to a gleaming art. Like its self-mocking dumpling star, this show has no waistline, no shape or defining contours.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Pronto" / 8 p.m. Showtime "Columbo's" Peter Falk trades in his trenchcoat for Miami Beach threads to play a bookie on the lam in this adaptation of a novel by Elmore Leonard ("Get Shorty"). Harry Arno (Falk), who's been skimming off his boss for 20 years, decides the time is right to rent an Italian villa with his ex-stripper girlfriend (Glenne Headly). But with the mob in pursuit, Harry gets some help from a sharp-shooting U.S. marshal (James LeGros) assigned to protect him.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not unexpectedly, comedy, music and awards shows dominate this fall's specials. And a good many documentaries and retrospectives focus on President John F. Kennedy, marking what would have been his 75th birthday and the 30th anniversary of his assassination. Contemporary issues and concerns are examined in several other documentaries, with such disparate hosts as Walter Cronkite and Tony Danza.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
He stands. Behind him is the curtain, facing him the studio audience, the camera and millions of faceless Americans preparing, once again, to be sent off to bed with an hour of light amusement and verbal vapor loosely defined as communication. He speaks. "Anyway, so how many of you saw Bill Clinton. . . ." He finishes the joke, then waits for the audience to finish laughing. He could be Carson or Leno or. . . . But he's not.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1989 | TERRY ATKINSON
Judging from the first and third episodes of PBS' new "Travels" series (9 p.m. on Channel 28, 8 p.m. on Channel 15), you'd be better off watching "2 on the Town." In tonight's opener, "The Waters Are Wide: A Journey to Tristan da Cunha," we're stuck on a mail boat with series executive producer John Heminway on the way to the South Atlantic's most remote island. Once we get there, Heminway notes, the small community treats him like an intruder.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY
NBC's coverage of the NBA Finals slam-dunked the competition for the third consecutive week, while overall viewing of the major networks keeps dwindling as the official start of summer approaches, according to results issued Tuesday by Nielsen Media Research. Basketball was easily the week's top gun, as the last two games of the Chicago Bulls-Utah Jazz series attracted a bigger audience than any of the preceding four.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|