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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2008 | Greg Burk, Special to The Times
The sax was amped through a Marshall half-stack. The crowd sported some rock-dude coifs and a skull on a shirt. Today's funk-fusion ain't the same as your dad's, as Thursday's performance by Rudder at the Baked Potato testified. But some things haven't changed. Plenty of audience dads were grandfathered in. The players represented an identifiable stripe of unkempt studio rat. Henry Hey's keyboard emulated a vintage Fender Rhodes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 30, 2013
Re "Crash puts spotlight on foreign pilots," July 28 The problem of pilots lacking stick-and-rudder skills isn't just a foreign one. Examples of pilot error abound: the crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407 in Buffalo, N.Y., in 2009, Air France Flight 447's crash into the Atlantic in 2010 and Asiana Airline's crash in San Francisco. In those cases, the evidence suggested that the aircrews lacked the ability to feel how the airplane was flying. In contrast, pilot Chesley Sullenberger's dead-stick ditching of US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River is an example of competence produced by high-quality training.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1997
Re "Fire Crews Prepare for Worst This Year," June 25: You should take a refresher course in journalism accuracy. The picture at the bottom of the page clearly shows a mechanic crawling out on the horizontal stabilizer maybe to check the elevator hinges; not the rudder hinges. The rudder, as most informed people would know, is a vertical tail component. REED WEST Fullerton
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2010 | By Michael Reicher, Los Angeles Times
The Balboa Island Ferry and the shops along Marine Avenue are some of the most charming places in Southern California. Unless you're disabled, according to Arnie Pike. Pike and a co-plaintiff are suing the city of Newport Beach to make Balboa Island more accessible. They say that there aren't enough disabled parking spaces along the main shopping street, that the sidewalks are too crowded with benches and signs, and that the Balboa Island Ferry is inaccessible. After two years of negotiations and court proceedings, the parties are going to trial.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | United Press International
A couple were rescued Saturday after being adrift in a 38-foot sailboat for two days, the Coast Guard said. The two, from Bellingham, Wash., were stranded when their boat developed rudder and engine troubles about 1,000 miles northeast of the Hawaiian Islands, officials said. The Coast Guard found the couple after receiving distress signals from the boat's emergency locater transmitter. They were reported in good condition.
MAGAZINE
August 31, 1986 | David DeVoss
On Nov. 27, 1095, Pope Urban II called upon Christendom to deliver the Holy Land from the Arabs, Saracens and Turks who had held it since the 7th Century. While the Holy Wars failed to restore Christian sovereignty to Jerusalem, they did set the stage for a series of nautical innovations that changed the course of history. Ocean travel had been possible since 1000 BC, when Phoenician traders in the eastern Mediterranean discovered that a keel gave stability to a ship under sail.
SPORTS
July 28, 1986 | CHRIS ELLO
After surviving one of the roughest starts of his career, Huntington Beach's Randy Smyth made it look easy in winning the fifth leg of the Pacific 1,000 catamaran race Sunday from Doheny State Beach to Mission Bay.
SPORTS
October 25, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Dennis Conner, tanned, confident and riding a crest of victories, said Friday that the America's Cup challengers have already divided themselves into contenders and pretenders, with Eagle among the pretenders. "They're finished," Conner said of the Newport Harbor Yacht Club's effort that won only four races and lost eight in the first round of trials this month. "They don't seem to be in it at all."
SPORTS
October 31, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
The Eagle upheaval and dry-land sparring among America's Cup challengers has kept things interesting until the second round of trials starts Sunday off Fremantle, Australia. Dennis Conner, who has a sailor's knack for finding the center of a storm, said last week that the vote to take core samples of New Zealand's fiberglass boat was 8-3 in favor, one short of the two-thirds needed from the 13 challengers. USA's Tom Blackaller was absent, and one syndicate was believed to have abstained.
NEWS
December 30, 2001 | JOHN BALZAR
Another day cracks open. Momentarily the light is without color. Restless thoughts have not yet gathered to weigh down the mind. Dawn has no memory. It is the optimist's time. In the back-shadows of daybreak we allow ourselves to believe that anything is possible. "The first hour of the morning is the rudder of the day," the old Congregationalist Henry Ward Beecher used to preach. Dawn is also a word we use to describe the turning of the calendar. As in, the dawn of a new year. So how much of this coming New Year will arise, dawn-like and optimistic, from our hopes?
NEWS
May 3, 2009 | Christopher Sherman, Sherman writes for the Associated Press.
Allison, a green sea turtle with only one flipper, has been going around and around and around for most of her life. But swimming in tight circles is tough for a 5-year-old turtle whose life expectancy is about 150 years. Allison was set straight last month, when researchers outfitted her in a black neoprene suit with a carbon-fiber dorsal fin on the back that allows her to glide gracefully with other turtles. "That's a sea turtle doing what a sea turtle does," said Dave Cromwell, a worker who watched the turtle's new moves at Sea Turtle Inc., a Texas not-for-profit group that rehabilitates injured sea turtles.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2008 | Greg Burk, Special to The Times
The sax was amped through a Marshall half-stack. The crowd sported some rock-dude coifs and a skull on a shirt. Today's funk-fusion ain't the same as your dad's, as Thursday's performance by Rudder at the Baked Potato testified. But some things haven't changed. Plenty of audience dads were grandfathered in. The players represented an identifiable stripe of unkempt studio rat. Henry Hey's keyboard emulated a vintage Fender Rhodes.
WORLD
November 12, 2006 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
TRIBAL elders pleaded with Hamid Karzai to intervene in a land feud with their neighbors. But it was too dangerous for the president of Afghanistan to travel south to the heart of the Taliban insurgency, so Karzai invited them up to Kabul for lunch. At least 120 men arrived, making their way past razor wire strung out a mile from the palace doors. After being repeatedly frisked and scanned, they finally passed through the palace gates.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2005 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
The first message was posted just six minutes after the news broke Tuesday that ABC anchor Peter Jennings had been diagnosed with lung cancer. By the end of the week, more than 3,400 e-mails offering him prayers and good wishes had filled the network's online message board -- many of them expressing an intensely personal sense of grief. "Our old and trusted friend, you have looked out for all of us for so long, and comforted us in our time of need," wrote Peggi and Ron Barratt.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. airlines are being ordered to inspect the rudders of certain Airbus jets after an incident in which most of the rudder fell off an A310 in flight, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration said. The FAA directive affects A310s and A300-600s. American Airlines and FedEx are the only U.S. airlines that fly those models. A plane operated by Canada's Air Transat lost nearly all of its rudder March 6 but was able to land safely.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2004 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
After a three-year investigation, federal air safety investigators announced Tuesday that an unusual combination of human and mechanical factors caused the crash of American Airlines Flight 587 and called for new design requirements that would prevent mistakes by pilots from causing an airliner's tail fin to rip off in flight. The National Transportation Safety Board determined that the direct cause of the crash, which occurred two months after the Sept.
NEWS
August 17, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Amid growing concern that the crash of a Japan Air Lines 747 earlier this week might have been caused by a structural failure, Boeing Co. has issued a "service advisory" to all Boeing 747 operators, saying they "may wish to inspect" tail sections of the planes, company spokesmen said Friday. The special inspection follows by one day a mandatory order, issued by Japan's Transportation Ministry to the nation's four airlines, calling for detailed inspections of Boeing 747 tail sections.
SPORTS
July 31, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
One competitor has broken ribs, a beach volunteer has a broken arm, sails have ripped and rudders have broken, but Randy Smyth keeps sailing along. "It was a gorgeous sail around Catalina," said Smyth, the runaway leader of the Pacific 1000 catamaran race off the Southern California coast. "San Clemente Island looked like it was cut out of a piece of paper."
WORLD
February 28, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An Air France supersonic Concorde airliner bound for New York from Paris lost a piece of its rudder in flight but still landed safely and on time at its destination, the airline announced. Air France said a technical investigation of the incident was underway. The rudder problem came a week after another of the airline's Concordes on the same route made an emergency landing in Canada after one of its engines malfunctioned.
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