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Rudiger Carl

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August 17, 2003 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Although it may not register high on most cultural calendars, one Los Angeles debut next weekend will have an offbeat distinction: In a small but fervent corner of the musical cosmos -- European free improvisation -- Germany's Rudiger Carl qualifies as a bona fide celebrity because of his prowess on the accordion. Yes, the accordion. The instrument that for some evokes folklore, polkas, wedding music and, occasionally, jazz and classical tunes has a much richer tradition than stereotypes allow.
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August 25, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Two summers ago, Pauline Oliveros, an American composer and performer who calls her meditative music "deep listening," improvised on her accordion in the backyard of the Schindler House. Police helicopters roared in the West Hollywood skies. A spider silently wove its web, as L.A. Weekly critic Alan Rich delightedly pointed out to those around him.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2003 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Two summers ago, Pauline Oliveros, an American composer and performer who calls her meditative music "deep listening," improvised on her accordion in the backyard of the Schindler House. Police helicopters roared in the West Hollywood skies. A spider silently wove its web, as L.A. Weekly critic Alan Rich delightedly pointed out to those around him.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
Although it may not register high on most cultural calendars, one Los Angeles debut next weekend will have an offbeat distinction: In a small but fervent corner of the musical cosmos -- European free improvisation -- Germany's Rudiger Carl qualifies as a bona fide celebrity because of his prowess on the accordion. Yes, the accordion. The instrument that for some evokes folklore, polkas, wedding music and, occasionally, jazz and classical tunes has a much richer tradition than stereotypes allow.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003 | Josef Woodard
In July, a unique midnight concert kicked up at the Jazz a Vienne festival in France, south of Lyon. For 75 unbroken minutes, two accordionists owned the stage, to the delight of a rapt crowd. Blind Austrian virtuoso Otto Lechner joined French accordionist Arnaud Methivier in a meandering set that navigated through abstract improvisational passages, hit some tuneful landmarks and ended with a breezy encore of "Walking on the Moon."
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