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Rudolf Bing

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NEWS
July 31, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Every morning, just around 10 o'clock, a haunted-looking woman descends from the elevator at the Essex House. Her eyes scan the lobby, seeing everything and nothing. Looking disheveled, in clothes that are shabby and sometimes outlandish, she stands out in this bastion of sedate business people and well-heeled tourists. Sometimes she stops to talk to a child. But adults who would like to speak to her are dismissed with a vacant stare and barely a word.
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NEWS
September 3, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sir Rudolf Bing, the ascetic and acerbic general manager of the New York Metropolitan Opera for 22 years, died Tuesday. He was 95. Bing, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease and was the subject of court battles over his care, died at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y., said Francois Giuliani, a spokesman for the Metropolitan. He had lived at the Hebrew Home for the Aged in the Bronx since 1989.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ailing opera impresario Rudolf Bing, 86, was abused and prevented from getting proper care by his wife, said witnesses at a recent hearing in New York to determine whether Carroll Bing, 48, should be thrown out of his home. Bing's lawyer has asked a judge to annul the Bings' January, 1987, marriage, claiming the 86-year-old former Metropolitan Opera leader, who has Alzheimer's disease, didn't know what he was doing when he married her.
NEWS
August 14, 1988
Your story is headed: "An Operatic Decline." I call it "A Journalistic Decline"--a respected newspaper stooping to the level of a scurrilous scandal sheet. Sir Rudolf's illness and mental decline are a personal tragedy, but there is nothing "ignoble" about it. This is not investigative reporting, of which The Times has given us many brilliant and beneficial examples, but snooping of the lowest kind. Ignoble, indeed! THEODORE FRONT Los Angeles
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Lady Carroll Douglass Bing, wife of former Metropolitan Opera impresario Sir Rudolf Bing, has been hospitalized in a psychiatric ward for the past two weeks, her lawyer says. Attorney Harvey Sladkus said Tuesday that police took her to St. Luke's Hospital in Manhattan on July 17 and she was admitted after "an incident involving some friends of hers. What the incident was, I don't know." "She's an emotionally fragile lady," Sladkus said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
The story may be apocryphal, but I doubt it. A great diva, basking in the twilight of a long career, was singing Tosca one night at the Met in 1961. Before the performance, her dresser asked if she had yet heard Leontyne Price, who had just made a sensational debut as Leonora in "Il Trovatore." The great diva, herself a celebrated if fading exponent of the same role, quivered a few chins in lofty disapproval. "Ah, yes," she purred. "Price. A lovely voice.
NEWS
August 14, 1988
I was deeply shocked by your most insensitive article about the situation in which Sir Rudolf Bing finds himself at the present ("An Operatic Decline," July 31, by Elizabeth Mehren). Why pry into the tragedy of an old man in the last stages of Alzheimer's disease? With an almost sadistic insistence, every humiliating detail is forced on us. Why not let us keep the memory of this extraordinary man--so brilliant, witty and able to impose on the Met the most interesting years--and a man who cared with angelic patience for his first wife, Nina, during her very long illness?
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | United Press International
Sir Rudolf Bing, former director of the New York Metropolitan Opera who was ruled unable to handle his affairs, vanished after he went out to buy cigarettes and was found wandering unharmed in downtown London nearly 10 hours later, Scotland Yard said today. The 85-year-old virtuoso, who suffers from Alzheimer's disease, disappeared at mid-morning Thursday when he left his hotel, according to his wife, Carroll, 47, a former geriatric nurse.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sir Rudolf Bing, the ascetic and acerbic general manager of the New York Metropolitan Opera for 22 years, died Tuesday. He was 95. Bing, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease and was the subject of court battles over his care, died at St. Joseph's Hospital in Yonkers, N.Y., said Francois Giuliani, a spokesman for the Metropolitan. He had lived at the Hebrew Home for the Aged in the Bronx since 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The marriage of Sir Rudolf Bing to Carroll Douglass was ordered annulled Wednesday by a Manhattan Supreme Court judge after a trial in which Bing's court-appointed guardian claimed the former opera impresario suffers from Alzheimer's disease and was unaware that he had gotten married. Bing, 87, who once ruled the Metropolitan Opera with an iron hand, and Douglass, 50, were married on Jan. 9, 1987. Bing is presently being cared for at a Bronx nursing home.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Lady Carroll Douglass Bing, wife of former Metropolitan Opera impresario Sir Rudolf Bing, has been hospitalized in a psychiatric ward for the past two weeks, her lawyer says. Attorney Harvey Sladkus said Tuesday that police took her to St. Luke's Hospital in Manhattan on July 17 and she was admitted after "an incident involving some friends of hers. What the incident was, I don't know." "She's an emotionally fragile lady," Sladkus said.
NEWS
July 31, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Every morning, just around 10 o'clock, a haunted-looking woman descends from the elevator at the Essex House. Her eyes scan the lobby, seeing everything and nothing. Looking disheveled, in clothes that are shabby and sometimes outlandish, she stands out in this bastion of sedate business people and well-heeled tourists. Sometimes she stops to talk to a child. But adults who would like to speak to her are dismissed with a vacant stare and barely a word.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Ailing opera impresario Rudolf Bing, 86, was abused and prevented from getting proper care by his wife, said witnesses at a recent hearing in New York to determine whether Carroll Bing, 48, should be thrown out of his home. Bing's lawyer has asked a judge to annul the Bings' January, 1987, marriage, claiming the 86-year-old former Metropolitan Opera leader, who has Alzheimer's disease, didn't know what he was doing when he married her.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | United Press International
Sir Rudolf Bing, former director of the New York Metropolitan Opera who was ruled unable to handle his affairs, vanished after he went out to buy cigarettes and was found wandering unharmed in downtown London nearly 10 hours later, Scotland Yard said today. The 85-year-old virtuoso, who suffers from Alzheimer's disease, disappeared at mid-morning Thursday when he left his hotel, according to his wife, Carroll, 47, a former geriatric nurse.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER
The story may be apocryphal, but I doubt it. A great diva, basking in the twilight of a long career, was singing Tosca one night at the Met in 1961. Before the performance, her dresser asked if she had yet heard Leontyne Price, who had just made a sensational debut as Leonora in "Il Trovatore." The great diva, herself a celebrated if fading exponent of the same role, quivered a few chins in lofty disapproval. "Ah, yes," she purred. "Price. A lovely voice.
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