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Rudolf Michael Schindler

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BOOKS
February 26, 1989 | Sam Hall Kaplan
August Sarnitz's "R. M. Schindler" (Rizzoli: $35; 224 pp.; 0-8478-0921-8) documents the career of one of the most influential and innovative architects who ever practiced in Los Angeles. Born in Austria in 1887, schooled at the legendary Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, and apprenticed under Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolf Michael Schindler opened an office in Los Angeles in 1921 to champion the simple, functional and well-detailed designs of the so-called International Style. While dutifully tracing Schindler's work and philosophy, Sarnitz, in this dry, awkwardly designed, academic monograph, unfortunately fails to convey the pioneering spirit of the architect and how he adapted his rationally conceived designs to the varied landscape and life styles of Southern California.
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February 18, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Propelled by a dream of creating a new kind of architecture based on modern aesthetics and utopian ideals, Rudolf M. Schindler in 1914 packed his bags and left Vienna. He realized his vision in Los Angeles, where 56 of his buildings erected between 1921 and 1952 are still standing.
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NEWS
October 1, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
The West Hollywood house that Viennese expatriate architect Rudolf Michael Schindler built for himself in 1922 is more than an enduring icon of early modern architecture, more than the prototype of new ideas that have deeply influenced residential design throughout the United States and abroad: The Schindler House was the temple of bohemian exuberance in a young Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
The West Hollywood house that Viennese expatriate architect Rudolf Michael Schindler built for himself in 1922 is more than an enduring icon of early modern architecture, more than the prototype of new ideas that have deeply influenced residential design throughout the United States and abroad: The Schindler House was the temple of bohemian exuberance in a young Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1996 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Propelled by a dream of creating a new kind of architecture based on modern aesthetics and utopian ideals, Rudolf M. Schindler in 1914 packed his bags and left Vienna. He realized his vision in Los Angeles, where 56 of his buildings erected between 1921 and 1952 are still standing.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | Sam Hall Kaplan, Kaplan also appears in The Times' Real Estate section.
Modern architecture did not come to Los Angeles in the form of a sleek 1950s office tower, as in most other cities, but in 1922 with a fragile one-story complex tucked away in West Hollywood. Designed by R. M. Schindler as a double house and studio for himself and a colleague, the striking horizontal structure at 835 N. Kings Road was sited to embrace as much of the grounds as possible, so that rooms flowed out into common courtyards.
BOOKS
February 26, 1989 | Sam Hall Kaplan
August Sarnitz's "R. M. Schindler" (Rizzoli: $35; 224 pp.; 0-8478-0921-8) documents the career of one of the most influential and innovative architects who ever practiced in Los Angeles. Born in Austria in 1887, schooled at the legendary Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna, and apprenticed under Frank Lloyd Wright, Rudolf Michael Schindler opened an office in Los Angeles in 1921 to champion the simple, functional and well-detailed designs of the so-called International Style. While dutifully tracing Schindler's work and philosophy, Sarnitz, in this dry, awkwardly designed, academic monograph, unfortunately fails to convey the pioneering spirit of the architect and how he adapted his rationally conceived designs to the varied landscape and life styles of Southern California.
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