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Rudolf Serkin

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NEWS
May 10, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rudolf Serkin, who began his life in abject poverty but spent it performing in nearly every grandiose concert hall in the world, has died, it was reported Thursday. Marry Lynn Fixler, his publicist, said he had died Wednesday night of cancer at a hospice in Guilford, Vt. The lanky, bespectacled pianist--who both looked like a scholar and played like one--was 88.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
In the 1960s, Rudolf Serkin, one the world's most revered pianists, used to fret about his hippie son, Peter. There was little question that Peter Serkin, a piano prodigy, had the capacity to follow in his father's famous footsteps. At 19, the younger Serkin already had won a Grammy. But the pianist, who plays a recital at Broad Stage on Sunday afternoon, was clearly headed on his own route. After dropping out for a few years to find himself, he helped found Tashi, one of the first countercultural classical chamber ensembles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Despite inconsistent and sometimes distant sound quality, these performances do not come from the Marlboro Festival's early years (it was founded in 1951) but from 1974 through 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
"Vladimir Horowitz: Live at Carnegie Hall" Vladimir Horowitz's technical ease, power, wide color palette, singing tone and musicianship sent other now-legendary pianists, including Rudolf Serkin, Arthur Rubinstein and Claudio Arrau, back to the practice room. Serkin said Horowitz "opened a new world for me," and Rubinstein admitted in his autobiography to feeling jealous after hearing Horowitz's near note-perfect playing. Arrau's own mother turned to him after a Horowitz recital and said, "He plays better than you. " Most baby boomers never got to hear that Horowitz, when his technique was unsurpassed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1985
The recital by pianist Rudolf Serkin, scheduled for Tuesday night in the Pavilion of the Music Center, has been canceled. According to a spokesman for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., sponsor of the recital, Serkin is suffering from "complete exhaustion," and on the order of his physician has withdrawn from all engagements for the next three weeks. The recital will be rescheduled at a date mutually agreed upon, and all tickets dated Dec. 17 will be honored on the rescheduled date.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
"Vladimir Horowitz: Live at Carnegie Hall" Vladimir Horowitz's technical ease, power, wide color palette, singing tone and musicianship sent other now-legendary pianists, including Rudolf Serkin, Arthur Rubinstein and Claudio Arrau, back to the practice room. Serkin said Horowitz "opened a new world for me," and Rubinstein admitted in his autobiography to feeling jealous after hearing Horowitz's near note-perfect playing. Arrau's own mother turned to him after a Horowitz recital and said, "He plays better than you. " Most baby boomers never got to hear that Horowitz, when his technique was unsurpassed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
In the 1960s, Rudolf Serkin, one the world's most revered pianists, used to fret about his hippie son, Peter. There was little question that Peter Serkin, a piano prodigy, had the capacity to follow in his father's famous footsteps. At 19, the younger Serkin already had won a Grammy. But the pianist, who plays a recital at Broad Stage on Sunday afternoon, was clearly headed on his own route. After dropping out for a few years to find himself, he helped found Tashi, one of the first countercultural classical chamber ensembles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2003 | Mark Swed; Richard S. Ginell; Chris Pasles; Josef Woodard
"Vladimir Horowitz Rediscovered: Carnegie Hall Recital, Nov. 16, 1975" Vladimir Horowitz, piano (RCA Victor Red Seal) ** "The Incomparable Rudolf Serkin" Rudolf Serkin, piano (Deutsche Grammophon) ** Rudolf Serkin and Vladimir Horowitz were close contemporaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1999 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A test: Read only the list of scheduled pieces for a piano recital taking place in a chandelier-filled emporium and try to guess who is about to play them. Hard to do, because most A-circuit pianists luxuriate in the standard repertory, and one program can look pretty much like another. Then there's Peter Serkin, that rare figure equally dedicated to music of the past and the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Age may be sufficient justification for veneration, but it does not automatically insure the survival of an artist's claim to fame. Come March 28, Rudolf Serkin will celebrate his 83rd birthday. He returned to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Wednesday night to make up the recital he missed in December because of illness, and it was only human that his devoted public should be concerned as to his pianistic condition. It was not to worry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2003 | Mark Swed; Richard S. Ginell; Chris Pasles; Josef Woodard
"Vladimir Horowitz Rediscovered: Carnegie Hall Recital, Nov. 16, 1975" Vladimir Horowitz, piano (RCA Victor Red Seal) ** "The Incomparable Rudolf Serkin" Rudolf Serkin, piano (Deutsche Grammophon) ** Rudolf Serkin and Vladimir Horowitz were close contemporaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2000 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Despite inconsistent and sometimes distant sound quality, these performances do not come from the Marlboro Festival's early years (it was founded in 1951) but from 1974 through 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1999 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A test: Read only the list of scheduled pieces for a piano recital taking place in a chandelier-filled emporium and try to guess who is about to play them. Hard to do, because most A-circuit pianists luxuriate in the standard repertory, and one program can look pretty much like another. Then there's Peter Serkin, that rare figure equally dedicated to music of the past and the present.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rudolf Serkin, who began his life in abject poverty but spent it performing in nearly every grandiose concert hall in the world, has died, it was reported Thursday. Marry Lynn Fixler, his publicist, said he had died Wednesday night of cancer at a hospice in Guilford, Vt. The lanky, bespectacled pianist--who both looked like a scholar and played like one--was 88.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1986 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
Age may be sufficient justification for veneration, but it does not automatically insure the survival of an artist's claim to fame. Come March 28, Rudolf Serkin will celebrate his 83rd birthday. He returned to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Wednesday night to make up the recital he missed in December because of illness, and it was only human that his devoted public should be concerned as to his pianistic condition. It was not to worry.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1985
The recital by pianist Rudolf Serkin, scheduled for Tuesday night in the Pavilion of the Music Center, has been canceled. According to a spokesman for the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., sponsor of the recital, Serkin is suffering from "complete exhaustion," and on the order of his physician has withdrawn from all engagements for the next three weeks. The recital will be rescheduled at a date mutually agreed upon, and all tickets dated Dec. 17 will be honored on the rescheduled date.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1988 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The San Francisco Symphony announced Friday it will play in Shanghai on Feb. 29, the first time the orchestra has performed in China. The concert in the People's Municipal Auditorium will be the last on a 15-concert Asian tour by the orchestra. Pianist Rudolf Serkin, 84, is scheduled to join the symphony for Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto. The tour, opening on Feb. 9 in Hong Kong, will also take the orchestra to Taiwan and Japan.
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