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Rudolfo Linares

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NEWS
May 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Cook County's medical examiner said Friday he has not declared a homicide in the death of a toddler whose father is charged with murder for removing the comatose boy from a hospital life-support system. Dr. Robert Stein said that for now he has ruled the manner of Samuel Linares' death "undetermined" while declaring the immediate cause to be a lack of oxygen to the brain caused by the boy's choking on a balloon last summer. The termination of mechanical life support was a contributing factor, but not the immediate cause of 16-month-old Samuel's death, Stein wrote on the death certificate following an autopsy.
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NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Patients have the right to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment but active euthanasia is wrong, a report released in Chicago said. The report was written by a task force formed by Cook County State's Atty. Cecil Partee after an April, 1989, incident at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Illinois in which Rudy Linares, holding hospital workers at bay with a gun, turned off his 15-month-old son's respirator and cradled the baby in his arms until he died.
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NEWS
May 19, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
A Cook County grand jury Thursday voted against a murder indictment for Rudolfo Linares, the father who held hospital workers at gunpoint, disconnected his brain-damaged, comatose 15-month-old son from a respirator and, weeping, cradled the dying baby. Linares had tears in his eyes again Thursday after hearing the grand jury's decision. He had contended that he disconnected young Samuel from the machines three weeks ago "out of love." The 23-year-old house painter from Cicero did plead guilty to the unlawful use of a weapon--a misdemeanor--and was placed on one year's probation by Circuit Judge Robert Bastone for holding a cocked .357 magnum revolver on hospital personnel.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From United Press International
The man who held policemen and doctors at bay with a pistol in a hospital while he disconnected his brain-damaged infant son from life support last month was hospitalized Thursday for an overdose of the drug PCP, authorities said. Rudy Linares, 23, suffering from a reaction to PCP, also known as "Angel Dust," had cocaine and alcohol in his system also, police said. They said he had mistaken the drug for cocaine and apparently did not plan to commit suicide. Deputy Police Supt.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON and TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writers
Rudolfo and Tamara Linares visited their comatose son in the hospital for the last time Wednesday morning. After spending a few minutes with the infant, Tamara left the room. That is when, police say, Rudolfo drew a .357-caliber handgun, which he pointed at the lone nurse in the room. He then disconnected the respirator that had kept 15-month-old Samuel alive for the past eight months. Weeping, Rudolfo Linares cradled the baby in his arms for 40 minutes until the boy died.
NEWS
April 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Patients have the right to refuse life-sustaining medical treatment but active euthanasia is wrong, a report released in Chicago said. The report was written by a task force formed by Cook County State's Atty. Cecil Partee after an April, 1989, incident at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Illinois in which Rudy Linares, holding hospital workers at bay with a gun, turned off his 15-month-old son's respirator and cradled the baby in his arms until he died.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From United Press International
The man who held policemen and doctors at bay with a pistol in a hospital while he disconnected his brain-damaged infant son from life support last month was hospitalized Thursday for an overdose of the drug PCP, authorities said. Rudy Linares, 23, suffering from a reaction to PCP, also known as "Angel Dust," had cocaine and alcohol in his system also, police said. They said he had mistaken the drug for cocaine and apparently did not plan to commit suicide. Deputy Police Supt.
NEWS
June 4, 1989
The Chicago-area man who pulled his 15-month-old son off a life support system at gunpoint and kept police at bay while the child died in his arms April 26 returned to the hospital for the second time in less than a week. Two days after he was taken to Mac Neal Hospital suffering from a violent reaction to the illegal drug PCP, Rudolfo Linares, 23, was admitted to the same hospital after an overnight arrest for alleged drunk driving. A hospital spokeswoman declined to disclose Linares' condition or the reason for his hospitalization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1989 | JANE FRITSCH, Times Staff Writer
In what they described as the nation's most detailed right-to-die guidelines, the San Diego County Bar Assn. and the county's Medical Society on Thursday advocated the right of terminally ill patients or their families to end life-prolonging measures, including intravenous feeding. Under the guidelines, when a patient or his family requests that he be allowed to die, "the doctor does not have to provide any artificial means of prolonging life," said Dr. Lynn Sheffey, president of the San Diego County Medical Society.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | LARRY GREEN, Times Staff Writer
A Cook County grand jury Thursday voted against a murder indictment for Rudolfo Linares, the father who held hospital workers at gunpoint, disconnected his brain-damaged, comatose 15-month-old son from a respirator and, weeping, cradled the dying baby. Linares had tears in his eyes again Thursday after hearing the grand jury's decision. He had contended that he disconnected young Samuel from the machines three weeks ago "out of love." The 23-year-old house painter from Cicero did plead guilty to the unlawful use of a weapon--a misdemeanor--and was placed on one year's probation by Circuit Judge Robert Bastone for holding a cocked .357 magnum revolver on hospital personnel.
NEWS
May 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Cook County's medical examiner said Friday he has not declared a homicide in the death of a toddler whose father is charged with murder for removing the comatose boy from a hospital life-support system. Dr. Robert Stein said that for now he has ruled the manner of Samuel Linares' death "undetermined" while declaring the immediate cause to be a lack of oxygen to the brain caused by the boy's choking on a balloon last summer. The termination of mechanical life support was a contributing factor, but not the immediate cause of 16-month-old Samuel's death, Stein wrote on the death certificate following an autopsy.
NEWS
April 27, 1989 | ERIC HARRISON and TRACY SHRYER, Times Staff Writers
Rudolfo and Tamara Linares visited their comatose son in the hospital for the last time Wednesday morning. After spending a few minutes with the infant, Tamara left the room. That is when, police say, Rudolfo drew a .357-caliber handgun, which he pointed at the lone nurse in the room. He then disconnected the respirator that had kept 15-month-old Samuel alive for the past eight months. Weeping, Rudolfo Linares cradled the baby in his arms for 40 minutes until the boy died.
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