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Rudolph Marcus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was a rousing, old school celebration, complete with hip-hip-hoorays and a 500-voice-strong rendition of "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow." Caltech chemist Rudolph Marcus, whose work on the theory of electron transfer reactions won him the 1992 Nobel Prize in chemistry, arrived at the Pasadena campus on Wednesday for the first time since the prize was announced last week, and they threw a big party.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What becomes a Nobel laureate most? A new Porsche? A sailing yacht? How about a trip around the world? Not quite. A more modest and unusual legacy has awaited Southern California's Nobel Prize winners--a small fraternity that gained one member this week when USC chemistry professor George A. Olah claimed the world's top intellectual honor.
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NEWS
October 15, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Caltech professor won the 1992 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for theories that help explain how living things store energy, but first word of the $1.2-million award went to his answering machine. Rudolph A. Marcus was at a conference when Nobel committee officials left a message at his Pasadena home. A colleague who lives down the street said he got the next telephone call, a 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was a rousing, old school celebration, complete with hip-hip-hoorays and a 500-voice-strong rendition of "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow." Caltech chemist Rudolph Marcus, whose work on the theory of electron transfer reactions won him the 1992 Nobel Prize in chemistry, arrived at the Pasadena campus on Wednesday for the first time since the prize was announced last week, and they threw a big party.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The speed of everything around him, compared to life in his native Egypt, stunned Ahmed Zewail the moment he landed in America. "I think for five minutes I just had to stand there and absorb this whole new culture," the Caltech professor of chemical physics said of that moment 20 years ago in a Philadelphia airport. Now, with one major honor following another, Zewail is receiving international recognition for recording the formation and breaking of molecular bonds, a phenomenon that takes place so fast many scientists thought it could never be captured.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The speed of everything around him, compared to life in his native Egypt, stunned Ahmed Zewail the moment he landed in America. "I think for five minutes I just had to stand there and absorb this whole new culture," the Caltech professor of chemical physics said of that moment 20 years ago in a Philadelphia airport. Now, with one major honor following another, Zewail is receiving international recognition for recording the formation and breaking of molecular bonds, a phenomenon that takes place so fast many scientists thought it could never be captured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The speed of everything around him, compared to life in his native Egypt, stunned Ahmed Zewail the moment he landed in America. "I think for five minutes I just had to stand there and absorb this whole new culture," the Caltech professor of chemical physics said of that moment 20 years ago in a Philadelphia airport. Now, with one major honor following another, Zewail is receiving international recognition for recording the formation and breaking of molecular bonds, a phenomenon that takes place so fast many scientists thought it could never be captured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What becomes a Nobel laureate most? A new Porsche? A sailing yacht? How about a trip around the world? Not quite. A more modest and unusual legacy has awaited Southern California's Nobel Prize winners--a small fraternity that gained one member this week when USC chemistry professor George A. Olah claimed the world's top intellectual honor.
NEWS
June 7, 1990
Three Caltech faculty members have been elected to the American Philosophical Society. They are Don L. Anderson, the Eleanor and John R. McMillan Professor of Geophysics and former director of the Seismology Laboratory; Edward B. Lewis, the Thomas Hunt Morgan Professor of Biology, emeritus, and Rudolph A. Marcus, the Arthur Amos Noyes Professor of Chemistry. The organization, the country's first learned society, grew from Benjamin Franklin's 1743 proposal to establish a scientific society.
MAGAZINE
February 7, 1999 | Margaret Chapman
Caltech: Robert A. Millikan, Physics, 1923; Thomas Hunt Morgan, Medicine, 1933; Carl D. Anderson, Physics, 1936; Linus Pauling, Chemistry, 1954, and Peace, 1962; George W. Beadle, Medicine, 1958; Rudolf Mossbauer, Physics, 1961; Richard Feynman, Physics, 1965; Murray Gell-Mann, Physics, 1969; Max Delbruck, Medicine, 1969; Renato Dulbecco, Medicine, 1975; Roger W. Sperry, Medicine, 1981; William A. Fowler, Physics, 1983; Rudolph A. Marcus, Chemistry, 1992; Edward B. Lewis, Medicine, 1995.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Caltech professor won the 1992 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for theories that help explain how living things store energy, but first word of the $1.2-million award went to his answering machine. Rudolph A. Marcus was at a conference when Nobel committee officials left a message at his Pasadena home. A colleague who lives down the street said he got the next telephone call, a 6 a.m.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The speed of everything around him, compared to life in his native Egypt, stunned Ahmed Zewail the moment he landed in America. "I think for five minutes I just had to stand there and absorb this whole new culture," the Caltech professor of chemical physics said of that moment 20 years ago in a Philadelphia airport. Now, with one major honor following another, Zewail is receiving international recognition for recording the formation and breaking of molecular bonds, a phenomenon that takes place so fast many scientists thought it could never be captured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The speed of everything around him, compared to life in his native Egypt, stunned Ahmed Zewail the moment he landed in America. "I think for five minutes I just had to stand there and absorb this whole new culture," the Caltech professor of chemical physics said of that moment 20 years ago in a Philadelphia airport. Now, with one major honor following another, Zewail is receiving international recognition for recording the formation and breaking of molecular bonds, a phenomenon that takes place so fast many scientists thought it could never be captured.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
The speed of everything around him, compared to life in his native Egypt, stunned Ahmed Zewail the moment he landed in America. "I think for five minutes I just had to stand there and absorb this whole new culture," the Caltech professor of chemical physics said of that moment 20 years ago in a Philadelphia airport. Now, with one major honor following another, Zewail is receiving international recognition for recording the formation and breaking of molecular bonds, a phenomenon that takes place so fast many scientists thought it could never be captured.
NEWS
April 18, 1993
Larry J. Hold has been named president of L. Norman Howe & Associates, a Pasadena-based marketing firm. L. Norman Howe & Associates is best known as the creator/producer of Coupons of Hope and Savings of Hope, food industry events that have raised more than $10 million for City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte. Hold received his bachelor's degree from the University of Santa Barbara in 1973, and his MBA from UCLA in 1980. * Dr. George F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1992
How quickly is a new scientific discovery recognized as new? In a world in which the number of working scientists is large and growing and in which their craving for the earliest possible news about developments in their fields is fed by ever swifter modes of transmission, recognition can still come with surprising slowness, rather as the accumulation of many acknowledgments than as instant, universal acclaim. So, at any rate, it seems to have been in the career of Rudolph A.
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