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Rudolph Schindler

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REAL ESTATE
July 18, 1993 | ADOLPH TISCHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Tischler, an artist, recently retired as head of the graphics department at the Aerospace Corp. in El Segundo and is devoting his time to fine art painting. and
Our home, designed by noted architect Rudolph Schindler in 1950 for my wife, Beatrice, and me is a historic cultural monument, so declared two years ago by the City of Los Angeles. Those who come to see the house today in its mature and mellow state are unaware of the trials and tribulations we endured in the beginning. As the original owner of the house, and still the occupant, my story is one of faith and perseverance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
June 2, 2013 | By Susan Brenneman
Rudolph Schindler is L.A.'s prototypical Modernist architect. His house on King's Road (the MAK Center now) is a public monument. Design magazines gush over Schindler restorations. Curbed LA , online, tracks the Schindler real estate market. And the great architect's fans follow his trail from the Hollyhock House (he supervised its creation for Frank Lloyd Wright) to the Bubeshko Apartments in Silver Lake to the Wolfe House on Catalina Island (before it was demolished), like pilgrims following the stations of the cross.
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NEWS
December 3, 1993 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Susan Vaughn is a frequent contributor to The Times
In the Verdugo Woodlands is a sylvan structure that rises from the earth like a giant stone-and-wood mushroom. It seems a proper haunt for wood nymphs, faerie queens and mischievous, pipe-blowing satyrs. Its frosty green facade harmonizes with plants, trees and arroyo rock nearby. But the unusual residence--called "the Rodriguez House" after its first owner, pianist Jose Rodriguez--was not created by Pan, Titania or any other mythical sprite.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Homes by big-name mid-century Modernist architects including John Lautner, Rudolph Schindler and Richard Neutra were on the market in 2012 -- at prices that may not be seen again soon. Among the heavy hitters were two homes by engineering-minded modernist Lautner. At the Foster Carling house in the Hollywood Hills, a retractable wall of glass separates the outdoor part of the swimming pool from an interior portion in the living room. The asking price is $2.995 million. In Malibu, a post-and-beam single-story house designed by Lautner as an ocean-view retreat features strong horizontal lines, unusually angled walls and windows and a triangular fireplace that juts into the living room.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012
Modernist architect Rudolph Schindler used movable concrete forms to create El Pueblo Ribera Court. This concrete, glass and redwood unit is one of six with views of legendary surfing beach Windansea. Location: Gravilla Street, La Jolla 92037 Asking price: $2.2 million Year built: 1923 Architect: Rudolph Schindler House size: Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, 1,400 square feet Features: Office, wood-beam ceilings, 1,500-square-foot deck, spa, San Diego historic site designation, Mills Act property tax reduction.
OPINION
June 2, 2013 | By Susan Brenneman
Rudolph Schindler is L.A.'s prototypical Modernist architect. His house on King's Road (the MAK Center now) is a public monument. Design magazines gush over Schindler restorations. Curbed LA , online, tracks the Schindler real estate market. And the great architect's fans follow his trail from the Hollyhock House (he supervised its creation for Frank Lloyd Wright) to the Bubeshko Apartments in Silver Lake to the Wolfe House on Catalina Island (before it was demolished), like pilgrims following the stations of the cross.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Homes by big-name mid-century Modernist architects including John Lautner, Rudolph Schindler and Richard Neutra were on the market in 2012 -- at prices that may not be seen again soon. Among the heavy hitters were two homes by engineering-minded modernist Lautner. At the Foster Carling house in the Hollywood Hills, a retractable wall of glass separates the outdoor part of the swimming pool from an interior portion in the living room. The asking price is $2.995 million. In Malibu, a post-and-beam single-story house designed by Lautner as an ocean-view retreat features strong horizontal lines, unusually angled walls and windows and a triangular fireplace that juts into the living room.
MAGAZINE
April 6, 2008 | Laurie Winer
German filmmaker Heinz Emigholz loves architecture, and he takes an almost comically purist view of it in his 2007 documentary "Schindler's Houses," an odd and interesting film that looks at 39 Los Angeles buildings (mostly houses) designed by Rudolph Schindler from the 1920s to the '50s.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
In a tip of the hat to revered Los Angeles modernist architects Gregory Ain, Rudolph Schindler, Harwell Harris and others, the American Institute of Architects' Los Angeles chapter is kicking off a series of home tours devoted to small, rarely seen designs that have been thoughtfully updated. The Modernist/Contemporary Tour launches Sept. 23 in Santa Monica with a tour of Harris' 850-square-foot house for John Entenza, the Arts & Architecture magazine editor who launched the Case Study program in the 1940s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Thomas S. Hines, a professor emeritus at UCLA, is the dean of architectural historians in Los Angeles, the author of major studies of the pioneering modernists Richard Neutra and Irving Gill. In "Architecture of the Sun: Los Angeles Modernism 1900-1970," he has produced a doorstop-sized magnum opus: a massive but terrifically detailed distillation of his thinking on the city where he has lived and taught, with only minor interruptions, since 1968. Unlike such younger historians as Sylvia Lavin, Hines' colleague at UCLA and the author of a 2005 book called "Form Follows Libido: Architecture and Richard Neutra in a Psychoanalytic Culture," Hines is not interested in putting architecture on the couch or for that matter in charting the political or economic forces that inevitably shape the cityscape from the outside in, as Mike Davis and others have done.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012
Modernist architect Rudolph Schindler used movable concrete forms to create El Pueblo Ribera Court. This concrete, glass and redwood unit is one of six with views of legendary surfing beach Windansea. Location: Gravilla Street, La Jolla 92037 Asking price: $2.2 million Year built: 1923 Architect: Rudolph Schindler House size: Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, 1,400 square feet Features: Office, wood-beam ceilings, 1,500-square-foot deck, spa, San Diego historic site designation, Mills Act property tax reduction.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
In a tip of the hat to revered Los Angeles modernist architects Gregory Ain, Rudolph Schindler, Harwell Harris and others, the American Institute of Architects' Los Angeles chapter is kicking off a series of home tours devoted to small, rarely seen designs that have been thoughtfully updated. The Modernist/Contemporary Tour launches Sept. 23 in Santa Monica with a tour of Harris' 850-square-foot house for John Entenza, the Arts & Architecture magazine editor who launched the Case Study program in the 1940s.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Motion picture executive Brad Kembel and his partner Jimmy Ferrareze have bought the landmark James Eads How House in Silver Lake for $1.3 million. Designed by modern architect Rudolph Schindler in 1925, the restored and updated International Modern-style house had been priced at $4.995 million when movie producer and prolific renovator Michael LaFetra first listed it in 2008. The 2,426-square-foot home, a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, is considered a triumph of Schindler's early career and was influenced by his apprenticeship under Frank Lloyd Wright.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Former National Public Radio writer and producer Chumi Paul has purchased a Rudolph Schindler-designed home in the Silver Lake area for $600,000. The midcentury house, built in 1956, is known as Schindler's last commissioned home. The modernist architect died in 1953 at 65 without seeing the project completed. The two-bedroom-plus-office house is entered through a first-level foyer. Original details include wooden sconces, room dividers, pocket doors, cabinets and other built-ins.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Thomas S. Hines, a professor emeritus at UCLA, is the dean of architectural historians in Los Angeles, the author of major studies of the pioneering modernists Richard Neutra and Irving Gill. In "Architecture of the Sun: Los Angeles Modernism 1900-1970," he has produced a doorstop-sized magnum opus: a massive but terrifically detailed distillation of his thinking on the city where he has lived and taught, with only minor interruptions, since 1968. Unlike such younger historians as Sylvia Lavin, Hines' colleague at UCLA and the author of a 2005 book called "Form Follows Libido: Architecture and Richard Neutra in a Psychoanalytic Culture," Hines is not interested in putting architecture on the couch or for that matter in charting the political or economic forces that inevitably shape the cityscape from the outside in, as Mike Davis and others have done.
HOME & GARDEN
March 27, 2010 | Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
By restoring some 1920s bungalow courts slated for demolition, the Hollywood Community Housing Corp. created homes for low-income people with special needs. Now that work is being recognized with a Los Angeles Conservancy Preservation Award. The Hollywood Bungalow Courts project is one of eight that the conservancy recognized. One other residential project, the Rudolph Schindler Bubeshko Apartments in Silver Lake, also was honored. In Hollywood, three bungalow courts on Serrano Avenue were to be replaced with condominiums, but the Community Redevelopment Agency stepped in, and they were spared, along with a bungalow court on Kingsley Drive.
HOME & GARDEN
September 13, 1997 | LEON WHITESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jacqueline Markham was a child playing on the lawn of the house on Kings Road in West Hollywood, she liked its clean modern lines and air of quiet simplicity. Thirty years later, she bought the house the moment she heard it was was up for sale. "Ever since I can remember I've always loved the 1950s style of architecture," Markham says. "There's something so fresh and uncluttered about it. Something, well, pure, in comparison with other kinds of houses."
BUSINESS
January 24, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Former National Public Radio writer and producer Chumi Paul has purchased a Rudolph Schindler-designed home in the Silver Lake area for $600,000. The midcentury house, built in 1956, is known as Schindler's last commissioned home. The modernist architect died in 1953 at 65 without seeing the project completed. The two-bedroom-plus-office house is entered through a first-level foyer. Original details include wooden sconces, room dividers, pocket doors, cabinets and other built-ins.
MAGAZINE
April 6, 2008 | Laurie Winer
German filmmaker Heinz Emigholz loves architecture, and he takes an almost comically purist view of it in his 2007 documentary "Schindler's Houses," an odd and interesting film that looks at 39 Los Angeles buildings (mostly houses) designed by Rudolph Schindler from the 1920s to the '50s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2001 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
In the mythological landscape of Los Angeles, architecture still revolves around two opposing figures: Richard Neutra and Rudolph Schindler. Neutra was the publicity-seeking genius; Schindler the talented second fiddle, the underappreciated bon vivant. The truth, of course, is more subtle. Judging by the work he produced in Los Angeles from 1922 to his death in 1953, Schindler was an undeniable success, a larger-than-life figure who created half a dozen or so genuine architectural masterpieces.
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