Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRudolph Valentino
IN THE NEWS

Rudolph Valentino

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the coronation scene in "Desiree," Marlon Brando wore an outfit worthy of an emperor. Based on David's famous paint ing of Napoleon's actual coronation, the 40-year-old costume includes a crimson robe embroidered with golden bees, lined with white fur and ermine tails, and sporting a train worthy of a royal bride.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Writer-director Michael Singh's documentary "Valentino's Ghost" connects the United States' Middle East foreign policy agenda to the American media's often negative portrayals of Arabs and Muslims. It's a provocative, absorbing - and at times dicey - study. Using film and TV clips plus archival news footage, the India-born Singh ambitiously tracks the on-screen depiction of Arabs starting in the 1920s when Rudolph Valentino melted hearts as "The Sheik" and Douglas Fairbanks swashbuckled his way through "The Thief of Bagdad.
Advertisement
BOOKS
May 11, 2003 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of, most recently, the memoir, "Good Morning, Mr. Zip Zip Zip." His film biography of Charles Chaplin, "Charlie," will premiere at the Cannes Film Festival later this month.
This much almost everyone knows about Rudolph Valentino: He died at a tragically early age (31), and his sudden, shocking passing set off the first (and still perhaps the most lunatic) orgy of mass mourning in the history of premature celebrity deaths. Some 30,000 near-rioutous citizens turned up outside the funeral home when his body was placed on view.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2011
There are few remnants left of the venerable Ambassador Hotel, the site of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's shooting in 1968, after it was demolished to make way for the Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools that opened last year. There's still the east wall, which was the location of the famed Cocoanut Grove nightclub. Designed by Pasadena architect Myron Hunt, the glitzy spot opened on New Year's Day 1921 and quickly became a Hollywood favorite. During its first decade, Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, Rudolph Valentino and Gloria Swanson were frequent visitors.
NEWS
July 6, 1995 | JANE HULSE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People strolling by David Woolley's Hollywood Beach house usually do a double take. There, embedded in the brick and stone wall, are an old porcelain hot water knob, Buddhas, a big-mouth fish, a pig with a derby and empty whiskey bottles. For 15 years, Woolley has been adding, well, things to the wall, partly as a way of capturing periods in his life, like the old drinking fountain from the razed elementary school that his sons attended.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
It was the tango that changed the world. Flash back to 1921. Female moviegoers were entranced with such handsome athletic actors as Douglas Fairbanks, Richard Barthlemess and Wallace Reid. But nothing prepared them for Rudolph Valentino's performance that year in Rex Ingram's acclaimed "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse." As Julio, the charming wastrel grandson of a wealthy Argentine landowner before World War I, the smoldering Italian actor commands the screen, especially when he is in a local Buenos Aires dive watching a man and woman tango.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1988
About 100 of the faithful gathered Tuesday at the Hollywood mausoleum where Rudolph Valentino is entombed to commemorate the 62nd anniversary of the screen idol's death. Among those attending a 45-minute memorial service was Estrellita Del Regil, who claims to be the daughter of the original "Lady in Black," a mysterious figure who attended the annual memorial service for many years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1990
Silent film legend Rudolph Valentino has been dead 64 years, but annual commemorations of his passing continue to draw hundreds. About 200 people gathered Thursday to eulogize Valentino, an icon of the silent screen. Most of the fans who attended the service in the Hollywood Memorial Park mausoleum, where Valentino is interred, were too young to have seen such films as "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" and "The Sheik," the quintessential Valentino movie.
NEWS
September 26, 1996
Jean G. Valentino, 82, an Emmy Award-winning sound engineer and mixer for half a century. Valentino, the only nephew of silent film heartthrob Rudolph Valentino, earned a 1971 Emmy for sound mixing in the television movie "Tribes." He worked on more than 500 motion pictures and television series, including such hits as "Twilight Zone," "Rin Tin Tin," "Rawhide," "Petticoat Junction," "Bewitched" and "Father Knows Best."
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | Kevin Thomas
By 1918 Carmel Myers, best remembered as the vamp Iras of "Ben-Hur" (1925), was already an above-the-title star at Universal, which that year cast the 18-year-old Myers in two charming comedies, "A Society Sensation" and "All Night." Carmel saw such potential in her new leading man she urged Carl Laemmle to sign him to a long-term contract before another studio could snatch up Rudolph Valentino, a smolderingly handsome Italian-born onetime landscape gardener (and tea dancer and possible gigolo).
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
It was the tango that changed the world. Flash back to 1921. Female moviegoers were entranced with such handsome athletic actors as Douglas Fairbanks, Richard Barthlemess and Wallace Reid. But nothing prepared them for Rudolph Valentino's performance that year in Rex Ingram's acclaimed "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse." As Julio, the charming wastrel grandson of a wealthy Argentine landowner before World War I, the smoldering Italian actor commands the screen, especially when he is in a local Buenos Aires dive watching a man and woman tango.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2008 | AL MARTINEZ
We were lunching at Musso & Frank's, which is a glorious old restaurant on Hollywood Boulevard once filled with luminaries from the worlds of literature and cinema, but almost empty on this particular day. The place was opened in 1919 by John Musso and Frank Toulet, and its mixologist became famous creating perfect martinis for the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway and Rudolph Valentino, to name a few. My guess is that the current parade...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2008 | Elina Shatkin
AT THE end of an impressive if murky reflecting pool in the middle of a lawn so verdant it seems out of place, the original Hollywood swashbuckler, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., lies buried in one of the Hollywood Forever Cemetery's most ostentatious mausoleums. Even in death, he can schmooze with the best of them. Peter Lorre, Tyrone Power, Mel Blanc, Cecil B. DeMille, Edgar Ulmer, Jayne Mansfield and Fay Wray are fellow residents -- as is punk god Johnny Ramone, who's buried maybe 100 yards away.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Not only did he have "It," Rudolph Valentino also possessed the "S" factor -- he was sexy, sensuous, smoldering and swarthy. The original "Latin Lover" and the screen's first superstar, the Italian-born actor still mesmerizes audiences 81 years after his untimely death of a perforated ulcer at the age of 31.
REAL ESTATE
October 2, 2005 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
Rudolph Valentino often visited this home while it was being built for him on the eastern shore of Lake Sherwood starting in 1920. Unfortunately, the silent-screen star, who died in 1926, didn't live long enough to see the retreat completed in 1931. Today, the hillside house, originally a one-story with a loft, has a three-level addition. It took actress Dana Sparks ("Passions," "L.A.
NEWS
August 28, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
The Silent Movie Theatre celebrates Labor Day weekend with three Rudolph Valentino pictures, including the rarely seen "Monsieur Beaucaire." The other two, "The Sheik" and "The Son of the Sheik," are familiar.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS
The Silent Movie will mark the centennial of the birth of Rudolph Valentino, one of the most potent of film legends, with a screening tonight at 8 of "Camille" (1921) and of "The Four Horsemen of Apocalypse" (1921), which will be shown Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. with a glorious, restored print that reveals the full impact of the landmark film's visual grandeur.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2011
There are few remnants left of the venerable Ambassador Hotel, the site of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's shooting in 1968, after it was demolished to make way for the Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools that opened last year. There's still the east wall, which was the location of the famed Cocoanut Grove nightclub. Designed by Pasadena architect Myron Hunt, the glitzy spot opened on New Year's Day 1921 and quickly became a Hollywood favorite. During its first decade, Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, Rudolph Valentino and Gloria Swanson were frequent visitors.
BOOKS
May 11, 2003 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel is the author of, most recently, the memoir, "Good Morning, Mr. Zip Zip Zip." His film biography of Charles Chaplin, "Charlie," will premiere at the Cannes Film Festival later this month.
This much almost everyone knows about Rudolph Valentino: He died at a tragically early age (31), and his sudden, shocking passing set off the first (and still perhaps the most lunatic) orgy of mass mourning in the history of premature celebrity deaths. Some 30,000 near-rioutous citizens turned up outside the funeral home when his body was placed on view.
NEWS
April 24, 2003 | Kevin Thomas
By 1918 Carmel Myers, best remembered as the vamp Iras of "Ben-Hur" (1925), was already an above-the-title star at Universal, which that year cast the 18-year-old Myers in two charming comedies, "A Society Sensation" and "All Night." Carmel saw such potential in her new leading man she urged Carl Laemmle to sign him to a long-term contract before another studio could snatch up Rudolph Valentino, a smolderingly handsome Italian-born onetime landscape gardener (and tea dancer and possible gigolo).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|