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Rudy Acuna

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993
Rudy Acuna is an outspoken man. He loves the city of L.A. but hates the San Fernando Valley, where he lives and teaches, because, he says, it is a suffocating place that breeds racism. In front of sympathetic audiences, he elicits raucous applause when he uses his favorite lines. "I'm proud of being a militant," he says. "I'm proud of being a radical. I'm very proud of my age (59). I'm very proud of being a Mexican!"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999
Re "Chicano Studies Matures at CSUN," May 16. There is one educational segment affected by Rudy Acuna's teaching that is not mentioned in your article on his inestimable contribution to the teaching of history. In 1969, I enrolled in his Chicano studies course to enhance my knowledge base while teaching Latin American studies at a local high school. As mentioned, this was the first year of his course, and while many of the students were of Latino extraction, there were people like myself who wanted to know more about the dynamics of Chicano politics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a scene reminiscent of Chicano campus protests 20 years earlier, more than 500 Latino students and others converged on the UC Santa Barbara campus Thursday to protest the university's failure to hire a controversial Chicano studies professor from Cal State Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing dark glasses and rumpled jeans, professor Rudy Acuna strolls down the rows of his classroom at Cal State Northridge like a Mexican American Socrates, teasing his students, provoking them. He knows how to rile them up and calm them down, how to pepper his lectures with colloquial Spanish to get chummy with them, then how to back off and force them to rethink everything they thought they knew. The course is titled "History of the Chicano" but it has the feel of a United Farm Workers rally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1999
Re "Chicano Studies Matures at CSUN," May 16. There is one educational segment affected by Rudy Acuna's teaching that is not mentioned in your article on his inestimable contribution to the teaching of history. In 1969, I enrolled in his Chicano studies course to enhance my knowledge base while teaching Latin American studies at a local high school. As mentioned, this was the first year of his course, and while many of the students were of Latino extraction, there were people like myself who wanted to know more about the dynamics of Chicano politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing on stage in front of a large Mexican flag, activist Rudy Acuna urged an audience of Chicano students to continue a fight he started nearly 30 years ago, a fight he said has grown even more important over the years. "We want you to be proud of who you are," Acuna told the cheering audience of high school and college students. "We want you to know your history. We want you to join hands with other people to make change."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing dark glasses and rumpled jeans, professor Rudy Acuna strolls down the rows of his classroom at Cal State Northridge like a Mexican American Socrates, teasing his students, provoking them. He knows how to rile them up and calm them down, how to pepper his lectures with colloquial Spanish to get chummy with them, then how to back off and force them to rethink everything they thought they knew. The course is titled "History of the Chicano" but it has the feel of a United Farm Workers rally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1991 | MAYERENE BARKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a scene reminiscent of Chicano campus protests of 20 years ago, more than 500 Latino students and others converged on the UC Santa Barbara campus Thursday to protest the university's refusal to hire a controversial Chicano studies professor from Cal State Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chicano Studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who successfully sued the University of California for age bias, may collect more than $300,000 in damages but is not entitled to teach at its Santa Barbara campus, a federal judge has ruled. In denying Acuna's request for a tenured post at UC Santa Barbara, the judge found that the animosity between him and his potential colleagues was so great after 3 1/2 years of litigation that it would make his appointment "both impractical and inappropriate."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doing what he has done for most of his life, Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna lectured a federal court jury this week, standing before blown-up copies of documents and highlighting key phrases he said proved that the University of California refused to hire him because of age bias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1998 | EDWARD M. YOON
A book by a Cal State Northridge professor about Latino life in Los Angeles has won an annual award given for books on human rights, racism and intolerance. Chicano studies professor Rodolfo F. Acuna received the award from the Gustavus Myers Center in Arkansas for his book "Anything But Mexican: Chicanos in Contemporary Los Angeles." "His book is a scholarly account of racism in Los Angeles," said James R. Bennett, director of the center, which has been presenting the annual awards since 1984.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996
Chicano Studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who successfully sued the University of California for age bias, may collect more than $300,000 in damages but is not entitled to teach at its Santa Barbara campus, U.S. District Judge Audrey B. Collins has ruled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chicano Studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who successfully sued the University of California for age bias, may collect more than $300,000 in damages but is not entitled to teach at its Santa Barbara campus, a federal judge has ruled. In denying Acuna's request for a tenured post at UC Santa Barbara, the judge found that the animosity between him and his potential colleagues was so great after 3 1/2 years of litigation that it would make his appointment "both impractical and inappropriate."
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna's recent legal victory in an age discrimination suit against the University of California not only vindicated a prominent figure in Chicano studies but also underscored a provocative debate about the evolving field and its future course.
NEWS
December 3, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent legal victory by Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna in his age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California not only vindicated a prominent figure in Chicano studies but underscored a provocative debate about the evolving field and its future course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | JON D. MARKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ultimately, Rodolfo Acuna said, his victory was not just about age or academics or politics. It was about human rights. "Society has to change or it will blow up," the Chicano studies professor said to a crowd of admirers, lawyers, researchers and reporters Tuesday after winning a federal age-discrimination lawsuit against the University of California at Santa Barbara. "But if we work together, we can move mountains together."
NEWS
October 11, 1995
A retired UC San Diego historian on Tuesday praised Chicano activist and Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna, saying UC Santa Barbara should have hired him. Testifying in U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996
Chicano Studies professor Rodolfo Acuna, who successfully sued the University of California for age bias, may collect more than $300,000 in damages but is not entitled to teach at its Santa Barbara campus, U.S. District Judge Audrey B. Collins has ruled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doing what he has done for most of his life, Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna lectured a federal court jury this week, standing before blown-up copies of documents and highlighting key phrases he said proved that the University of California refused to hire him because of age bias.
NEWS
October 11, 1995
A retired UC San Diego historian on Tuesday praised Chicano activist and Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna, saying UC Santa Barbara should have hired him. Testifying in U.S.
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