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Rudy Giuliani

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NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Arriving for his fourth visit to New Hampshire this year, former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said he would decide by the end of the summer whether to mount another run for the presidency, and described President Obama's economic policies as disastrous for the country. When he ran for mayor in 1993, Giuliani recalled, he tried to convince Democrats to vote for him with a simple campaign pitch: "You cannot do any worse. " "I think we are pretty much in that same situation," he told about 100 guests gathered for the Seacoast Republican Women's luncheon at an event center in Hampton.
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NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Cathleen Decker
Politics addicts across the nation will engage today in the post-election tradition of gleaning great, defining truths from smallish, specific races. Much of the time, singular election results are just that, a reminder that all politics is local. But a few clear lessons did emerge from Tuesday's two hallmark contests: Opposites really do attract. Bill de Blasio's sweeping victory in the Democratic primary for New York mayor rested at least in part on the fact that he campaigned against the image and policies of the incumbent, billionaire Michael Bloomberg.
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NEWS
March 30, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It wasn't difficult for the producers of USA Network's new biographical picture, "Rudy: The Rudy Giuliani Story," to convince James Woods to play the former mayor of New York City. "There is nothing about him I don't like," says Woods, who is no stranger in bringing historical characters to life on screen. Woods previously played Roy Cohn in "Citizen Cohn," H.R. Haldeman in "Nixon," Alcoholics Anonymous co-founder Bill Wilson in "My Name Is Bill W.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Newt Gingrich appears to have an attack dog on his side - whether he wants him or not. Rudolph Giuliani, the pugnacious former New York mayor and GOP presidential candidate, took to two cable news morning shows Thursday and ended up shredding Mitt Romney's record and suggesting that Gingrich may be a more formidable candidate against President Obama next year. ( Watch video below. ) “There's something wrong when you've been running as long as Mitt has and you're at 25%…Seventy-five percent of the other Republicans are telling you something about him,” Giuliani said on MSNBC's “Morning Joe. " “I ran against him in '07, '08, I have never seen a guy -- and I've run in a lot of elections, supported a lot of people, opposed them -- never seen a guy change his positions on so many things, so fast, on a dime.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Still flirting with another presidential run, Rudolph W. Giuliani is scheduled to make what an aide calls an "important trip" to New Hampshire aimed as much at convincing the former New York mayor to run as convincing the state's voters that he's the Republican with the best chance to win in 2012. A planned two-day visit beginning Thursday is designed to showcase Giuliani's potential strengths in the still-uncertain race for the GOP nomination. He is to meet with various Republican groups throughout the Granite State, and participate in discussions on healthcare reform, job creation and crime.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2006 | From Newsday
Rudolph W. Giuliani has taken a giant first step toward a 2008 White House run, creating an exploratory committee and beating his pal John McCain to the punch in filing presidential paperwork. The sharp-elbowed former mayor registered the Rudy Giuliani Presidential Exploratory Committee Inc. on Friday with the New York secretary of state's office. That was also the day McCain signaled publicly that he wanted to set up a similar organization for his campaign.
OPINION
September 19, 2007
Re "The risk of President Guiliani," Opinion, Sept. 17 The one issue on which Rudy Giuliani is staking his campaign is 9/11. He ties everything to that event, no matter how absurd. I don't think his supporters understand what it would take to make the U.S. safe from terrorists. Many of the world's most ruthless governments started out by promising their people a safer society, all the while chipping away at civil liberties.
OPINION
December 26, 2006
Re "Giuliani's conservative credentials," Opinion, Dec. 21 Rudy Giuliani sounded interesting and like someone I could support right up until the end of the piece when Jonah Goldberg told me that Giuliani "signals that he would appoint judges in the mold of Supreme Court Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas." Despite the weight of constitutional authority providing otherwise, Scalia stated in a recent dissent that states are free to criminalize homosexual behavior between consenting adults; and Thomas stated in two of his dissents that a police officer's beating of an incarcerated criminal suspect without legal justification does not violate the constitutional ban against cruel and unusual punishment and that the protections of the Bill of Rights -- property rights, free speech, freedom of religion, etc. -- are not mandatory for the 50 states.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 1993
I want to point out a major flaw in the New York City mayoralty campaign piece ("City on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown," by Ronald Brownstein, Oct. 17). The problem is with Rudy Giuliani's baseball swing. To begin with, his front knee is buckling, resulting in an unwanted distribution of force, downward instead of forward and through the ball. Almost all good hitters hit off a stiff front leg, driving the momentum from the hips into the baseball. In Giuliani's case, the point is almost moot, as he's got virtually no hip action at all; see the way his rear leg sags forward lazily, just kind of along for the ride?
OPINION
February 5, 2008
Re "Where Rudy went wrong," Opinion, Feb. 3 Frank Luntz claims that there was nothing wrong with Rudy Giuliani's campaign message; his failure all had to do with style. I disagree. Giuliani's message was ripped from the George Bush playbook: "Vote for me or die in a terrorist attack." I think even die-hard Republicans are sick of this tactic. Giuliani may see it as appealing to those who want a strong leader, but most of the country has realized it means exactly the opposite.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Arriving for his fourth visit to New Hampshire this year, former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said he would decide by the end of the summer whether to mount another run for the presidency, and described President Obama's economic policies as disastrous for the country. When he ran for mayor in 1993, Giuliani recalled, he tried to convince Democrats to vote for him with a simple campaign pitch: "You cannot do any worse. " "I think we are pretty much in that same situation," he told about 100 guests gathered for the Seacoast Republican Women's luncheon at an event center in Hampton.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Still flirting with another presidential run, Rudolph W. Giuliani is scheduled to make what an aide calls an "important trip" to New Hampshire aimed as much at convincing the former New York mayor to run as convincing the state's voters that he's the Republican with the best chance to win in 2012. A planned two-day visit beginning Thursday is designed to showcase Giuliani's potential strengths in the still-uncertain race for the GOP nomination. He is to meet with various Republican groups throughout the Granite State, and participate in discussions on healthcare reform, job creation and crime.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By James Oliphant
Nothing excites the party in power more than when its rivals are fighting among themselves. So it was no surprise that the Democratic National Committee pounced upon word that Sarah Palin would be taking her Travels With Sarah tour to New Hampshire on the very day Mitt Romney formally announced his 2012 bid. Even better -- from the DNC's perspective -- was that Palin bashed Romney and his healthcare plan immediately before Romney stepped out...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2008 | Robert Lloyd, Times Television Critic
The night formerly known as Night Three of the Republican National Convention was dedicated to "Reform and Prosperity." But more important, it was the party's, and the country's, first substantial look at Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who in no time at all has become not only a national politician but a subject of controversy and a figure of symbolic import. She was the night's story, down to how well she would handle speaking off a teleprompter: "But we will see, because we're open-minded about what we're going to be anticipating," CNN's Wolf Blitzer said.
OPINION
February 5, 2008
Re "Where Rudy went wrong," Opinion, Feb. 3 Frank Luntz claims that there was nothing wrong with Rudy Giuliani's campaign message; his failure all had to do with style. I disagree. Giuliani's message was ripped from the George Bush playbook: "Vote for me or die in a terrorist attack." I think even die-hard Republicans are sick of this tactic. Giuliani may see it as appealing to those who want a strong leader, but most of the country has realized it means exactly the opposite.
OPINION
February 3, 2008 | Frank Luntz, Frank Luntz, a Republican pollster whose clients have included Rudolph W. Giuliani and Michael R. Bloomberg, is the author of "Words That Work: It's Not What You Say, It's What People Hear."
Politics is a battle of inches. An expression here, a sound bite there can often mean the difference between celebration and commiseration. A litany of reasons have been given for Rudy Giuliani's political collapse in this presidential race: Fatally flawed strategic errors, from bypassing all the early primary states to an almost obsessive focus on 9/11, from dodgy associates to a social policy agenda out of step with mainstream Republicans.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2007 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Being a top aide to New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani allegedly brought a lot of perks to Bernard Kerik -- a new Jacuzzi, a "marble entrance rotunda" installed in a Bronx apartment, $9,000 a month in rent payments for a flat on the Upper East Side -- many of them paid for by people who had business with the city. Those and other favors were laid out Friday in a corruption indictment against Kerik, New York's former police commissioner.
OPINION
April 27, 2007 | ROSA BROOKS
ARE WE A NATION of irrational wimps? Rudy Giuliani thinks so. On Tuesday, he claimed that if we elect a Democrat to the presidency, we should expect more 9/11-style attacks. This, he assumes, is enough to scare the pants off the voting public and send them scurrying frantically off to support Republicans such as ... well, Rudy Giuliani. Giuliani's line of argument -- though "argument" is too generous a word -- isn't new.
SPORTS
January 16, 2008 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Every vote counts in the race for the Republican Party nomination, especially for Rudy Giuliani, who has yet to crack the top three in a caucus or primary. But that isn't going to keep the former New York mayor from staying true to his sports teams. Foxnews.com reported that Giuliani, while campaigning in Florida for the Jan. 29 primary, refused to sign a Green Bay Packers cap during a meet and greet. The Packers play the New York Giants in the NFC championship game Sunday and Giuliani is a loyal Giants fan. "I won't sign that," Giuliani said.
NATIONAL
November 10, 2007 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Being a top aide to New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani allegedly brought a lot of perks to Bernard Kerik -- a new Jacuzzi, a "marble entrance rotunda" installed in a Bronx apartment, $9,000 a month in rent payments for a flat on the Upper East Side -- many of them paid for by people who had business with the city. Those and other favors were laid out Friday in a corruption indictment against Kerik, New York's former police commissioner.
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