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Rudy Perez

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November 13, 1988 | DOUGLAS SADOWNICK
Choreographer Rudy Perez paces nervously, his arms crossed, as his intense and scrutinizing stare focuses critically on his five sweat-drenched and heavily breathing dancers. They twist, tumble and turn athletically on the rehearsal floor of Westside Academy while also rotating in and out of clear-cut circular formations--all this against the backdrop of Lloyd Rodgers' pulsating, synthesized scales.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009
Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble Where: All Saints Church, 132 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price: Free, but reservations required Contact: (626) 792-5101
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1991 | LEWIS SEGAL
There's a wash of mournful music in the air as Rudy Perez walks behind a line of open umbrellas that mushroom up from the floor at LACE. Suddenly he leaps forward, flinging himself against empty space as if it were a barrier and then collapsing to the floor. Soon he winds a length of rope around his hands--compulsively stretching and twisting it, then, again, lashing out at the emptiness around him.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | Victoria Looseleaf
Seven dancers move in unison to the throbbing of minimalist music. Twitching spasmodically, the performers then indulge in a series of backward bends and sideways swooping. As the sun streams into the studio at Westside School of Ballet, it illuminates the dancers' dispassionate faces, their movement free from any lyrical or psychological elements. Indeed, this is the signature style of postmodern guru Rudy Perez, who turns 80 next month. Perez, having decamped from his native New York to Los Angeles more than three decades ago, is celebrating the milestone by -- what else?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Once upon a time, Rudy Perez played at the precipice, that place where, as a performance artist, he regularly uncovered the spiritual dangers of existence and held audiences in rapt attention all the while. Saturday at the L.A. Photography Center, the oft-awarded choreographer unveiled his latest effort, "Crossover Acts," a collaboration with the band LULA, and the results could hardly have been more free-wheeling or exuberant.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL
In his 10 years as a torchbearer for Los Angeles dance, Rudy Perez has created gestural monodrama, minimalist movement ritual and art pieces subordinating dancing to graphics or sculpture. Introduced at the Campus Theatre of El Camino College on Friday, Perez's two newest works seem more conventionally dancy than much of this output--yet they prove highly unconventional in their use of energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Nobody in modern dance and dance-based performance art captures the casual style and just as casual cruelty of Los Angeles with quite the icy scorn of Rudy Perez or the wounded but enduring faith of Tim Miller. At 55, Perez looks at the city with the eyes of a wary New York-born outsider. He misses nothing, and in remarkably mordant choreographic action-paintings he penetrates our rituals of self-celebration to reveal the abyss beneath.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
A likely caption for a picture of Rudy Perez might read: "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Dancer." But it was inevitable that the man whose track record in the avant-garde stretches back more than 25 years would halt his perpetual journey--now that a retrospective of his ground-breaking choreography is at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions: Six performances beginning March 30 of seminal works traceable to New York's Judson Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | JULIE WHEELOCK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Persian Gulf War has meant many things to many people, but to choreographer Rudy Perez it's meant a second performing wind. For the first time since 1983, Perez will appear on stage, performing a premiere work with his company, Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble, today through Sunday at LACE at 8 p.m. "Because of the war and recession, my company's morale is down," he says. "For a long time I didn't want to dance because I didn't need to.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2001 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, Victoria Looseleaf is a frequent contributor to Calendar
At just about the time you'd expect Rudy Perez, choreographer, dancer, company head and teacher, to be happily retired, he's starting anew. Perez, who turns 72 in November, is preparing for a return to the stage, with new dances and dancers and a solo for himself. Although he insists this is not a comeback, the concert is something to trumpet: Perez was awarded a $30,000 James Irvine Foundation dance fellowship in 1999 to document his teaching and choreographic process.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2008 | Victoria Looseleaf, Looseleaf is a freelancer writer.
Celebrating three decades of making dance in Los Angeles, postmodern master Rudy Perez, who recently turned 79, refuses to rest on his laurels. One of the co-founders of New York's experimental Judson Dance Theatre, a coterie of artists who would define boundary-breaking "downtown" aesthetics in 1962, Perez continues to chart an unwavering course where pedestrian moves transcend the mundane to reveal bold, deep ideas. Proof is visible in Perez's latest work, "Surrender, Dorothy!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Time may stop for no man, but it seems to have slowed for veteran choreographer Rudy Perez. Celebrating a quarter-century of dance making in Los Angeles (a co-founder of New York's Judson Theater Dance Workshop, his career spans five decades), Perez still commands attention with his acute insight into bodies moving through space.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2001 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
On the Luckman Theatre stage at Cal State L.A., Postmodern pioneer Rudy Perez is performing one of his many, many pieces that use wooden poles to define, divide and extend choreographic space. All the works on this two-hour Sunday program will incorporate poles in some way--but this one is drastically different.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2001 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, Victoria Looseleaf is a frequent contributor to Calendar
At just about the time you'd expect Rudy Perez, choreographer, dancer, company head and teacher, to be happily retired, he's starting anew. Perez, who turns 72 in November, is preparing for a return to the stage, with new dances and dancers and a solo for himself. Although he insists this is not a comeback, the concert is something to trumpet: Perez was awarded a $30,000 James Irvine Foundation dance fellowship in 1999 to document his teaching and choreographic process.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001
Rudy Perez, a pioneer of the American postmodern dance movement, will perform at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State L.A. on Sept. 9 at 3 p.m. The event will include music by Mark Ramos Nishita. Tickets are $20. Information: (323) 343-6600.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1998 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
Confused about the new masculinity? Get in line. Some 15 choreographers in two Southland venues showcased male expression over the weekend and only occasionally agreed about who or what a man might be. For "Men of Distinction" in the Keck Theater at Occidental College on Friday, senior dancers sat back and reminisced in pieces high in concept but generally limited in dance action.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001
Rudy Perez, a pioneer of the American postmodern dance movement, will perform at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex at Cal State L.A. on Sept. 9 at 3 p.m. The event will include music by Mark Ramos Nishita. Tickets are $20. Information: (323) 343-6600.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1988
Reading about the new partnership between Joffrey Ballet (based in New York and Los Angeles) and Cal State L.A. made me realize that even here art is about politics ("Joffrey and Cal State L.A.--Both to Benefit?" by Lewis Segal, Sept. 27). In the 10 years since I relocated from New York City, I see less and less support and opportunity for the Los Angeles dance companies. It never ceases to amaze me how the arts organizations and institutions continually look toward New York for their glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Once upon a time, Rudy Perez played at the precipice, that place where, as a performance artist, he regularly uncovered the spiritual dangers of existence and held audiences in rapt attention all the while. Saturday at the L.A. Photography Center, the oft-awarded choreographer unveiled his latest effort, "Crossover Acts," a collaboration with the band LULA, and the results could hardly have been more free-wheeling or exuberant.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1992 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Much as its title suggests, Rudy Perez's "The Dance-Crazy Kid From New Jersey Meets Hofmannsthal" is not in the vein of a '50s screwball comedy--despite any stray association to, say, "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein." But, as titles go it is a catchy one and a sizable crowd showed up at the Pasadena Armory Arts Center for the premiere of what has heretofore been a work-in-progress. The "Kid" is not even Perez himself, although perhaps an alter ego in the person of Ruth St.
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