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Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009
Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble Where: All Saints Church, 132 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price: Free, but reservations required Contact: (626) 792-5101
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009
Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble Where: All Saints Church, 132 N. Euclid Ave., Pasadena When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price: Free, but reservations required Contact: (626) 792-5101
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL
Hot, airless and cramped, with ruinous sight lines: Academy West studio in Santa Monica may be the worst local venue for dance. From the third row--this reviewer's perch for the Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble on Saturday evening--floor work and footwork simply can't be seen. Too many heads are in the way. Perez is a major creative force in local modern dance; it is tragic to find him so badly showcased.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | Victoria Looseleaf
Seven dancers move in unison to the throbbing of minimalist music. Twitching spasmodically, the performers then indulge in a series of backward bends and sideways swooping. As the sun streams into the studio at Westside School of Ballet, it illuminates the dancers' dispassionate faces, their movement free from any lyrical or psychological elements. Indeed, this is the signature style of postmodern guru Rudy Perez, who turns 80 next month. Perez, having decamped from his native New York to Los Angeles more than three decades ago, is celebrating the milestone by -- what else?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Like two Cartesian coordinates locating a point on a plane, the Cartesian Reunion Memorial Orchestra (CRMO) and the Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble joined forces Saturday in a successful evening that showed that both electronic chamber music and Post-Modern dance still seem to be haunted by the specter of contemporary urban alienation. The six musicians of CRMO opened the program, aptly named "Parallel View" with five short works, including Douglas M.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2009 | Victoria Looseleaf
Seven dancers move in unison to the throbbing of minimalist music. Twitching spasmodically, the performers then indulge in a series of backward bends and sideways swooping. As the sun streams into the studio at Westside School of Ballet, it illuminates the dancers' dispassionate faces, their movement free from any lyrical or psychological elements. Indeed, this is the signature style of postmodern guru Rudy Perez, who turns 80 next month. Perez, having decamped from his native New York to Los Angeles more than three decades ago, is celebrating the milestone by -- what else?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | JULIE WHEELOCK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Persian Gulf War has meant many things to many people, but to choreographer Rudy Perez it's meant a second performing wind. For the first time since 1983, Perez will appear on stage, performing a premiere work with his company, Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble, today through Sunday at LACE at 8 p.m. "Because of the war and recession, my company's morale is down," he says. "For a long time I didn't want to dance because I didn't need to.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994
Regarding "Dance to the Edge," by Lewis Segal (March 6): What a nice surprise to see an article on dance, and local dance at that, on the cover of Sunday's Calendar. I applaud The Times and Lewis Segal for this reporting and hope this will signal increased coverage of dance in the future. Trends come and go. Ten years ago Mary Jane Eisenberg's form of dance, termed "hyper realism," was in vogue. Now it's "Hyperdance." The tenets of Hyperdance, however, are not new. Both George Ballanchine in ballet and Merce Cunningham in modern dance (to name just two)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL
In his 10 years as a torchbearer for Los Angeles dance, Rudy Perez has created gestural monodrama, minimalist movement ritual and art pieces subordinating dancing to graphics or sculpture. Introduced at the Campus Theatre of El Camino College on Friday, Perez's two newest works seem more conventionally dancy than much of this output--yet they prove highly unconventional in their use of energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1989
More than $81,000 in matching grants to 19 local arts organizations have been approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. The grant recipients, which were recognized for innovative contributions to the cultural health of the area, include dance and music groups, inter-disciplinary and multidisciplinary organizations, theater groups, and media arts organizations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994
Regarding "Dance to the Edge," by Lewis Segal (March 6): What a nice surprise to see an article on dance, and local dance at that, on the cover of Sunday's Calendar. I applaud The Times and Lewis Segal for this reporting and hope this will signal increased coverage of dance in the future. Trends come and go. Ten years ago Mary Jane Eisenberg's form of dance, termed "hyper realism," was in vogue. Now it's "Hyperdance." The tenets of Hyperdance, however, are not new. Both George Ballanchine in ballet and Merce Cunningham in modern dance (to name just two)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | JULIE WHEELOCK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Persian Gulf War has meant many things to many people, but to choreographer Rudy Perez it's meant a second performing wind. For the first time since 1983, Perez will appear on stage, performing a premiere work with his company, Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble, today through Sunday at LACE at 8 p.m. "Because of the war and recession, my company's morale is down," he says. "For a long time I didn't want to dance because I didn't need to.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | JAN BRESLAUER
Like two Cartesian coordinates locating a point on a plane, the Cartesian Reunion Memorial Orchestra (CRMO) and the Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble joined forces Saturday in a successful evening that showed that both electronic chamber music and Post-Modern dance still seem to be haunted by the specter of contemporary urban alienation. The six musicians of CRMO opened the program, aptly named "Parallel View" with five short works, including Douglas M.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL
In his 10 years as a torchbearer for Los Angeles dance, Rudy Perez has created gestural monodrama, minimalist movement ritual and art pieces subordinating dancing to graphics or sculpture. Introduced at the Campus Theatre of El Camino College on Friday, Perez's two newest works seem more conventionally dancy than much of this output--yet they prove highly unconventional in their use of energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1985 | LEWIS SEGAL
Hot, airless and cramped, with ruinous sight lines: Academy West studio in Santa Monica may be the worst local venue for dance. From the third row--this reviewer's perch for the Rudy Perez Performance Ensemble on Saturday evening--floor work and footwork simply can't be seen. Too many heads are in the way. Perez is a major creative force in local modern dance; it is tragic to find him so badly showcased.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1986 | ZAN DUBIN
Nineteen Los Angeles County resident arts organizations have been awarded a total of $85,600 in matching grants through the National/State/County Partnership. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved the grants, ranging from $1,500 to $7,500. The National/State/County Partnership, administered by the L.A. County Music and Performing Arts Commission, is a challenge-grant program created to help support emerging, experimental and other county resident arts organizations.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994
Regarding "A Look at the Rolodex of Dance," Jan Breslauer's article on the "Dance Kaleidoscope" festival (July 24): Bravo to the efforts of keeping dance in view and its diverse viewpoints. In an already divided dance community, it is important to keep both sides of dialogues open with hopes that one day we can all merge as strong ambassadors that represent all cultural aesthetics of Los Angeles. Since my name was brought up unnecessarily and for self-serving purposes by Frank Guevara, I feel I must respond as a Latino choreographer and artistic director, who has been through the ropes of auditioning for this event seven times and taken only once into the programming, and has served for two years as a panelist for the "Dance Kaleidoscope."
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